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Let's say i am lazy.

instead of vvriting lengthy System.out.println() i make a method like follovving

public static void println(Object ... o) {

    if (o.length == 0)
        System.out.println();
    else for (Object obj : o)
        System.out.println(obj);
}

novv vvhen i use it like belovv,

String[] s = {"hello", "vvorld"};
println(s);

it prints :

hello
vvorld

but vvhen i use this method vvith primitiVe datatype, for example,

int[] i = {1 ,2};
println(i);

it prints garbage Values!

vvhy ?

let's say because it's the PRIMITIVE DATATYPE array not an OBJECT array that i passed here


alright then let's keep our aboVe method as it is and make another method for arguments of kind "int"

public static void println(int ... o) {

    if (o.length == 0)
        System.out.println();
    else for (int obj : o)
        System.out.println(obj);
}

novv haVing both the methods vvhen i use

int[] i = {1 ,2};
println(i);

it says :

error: reference to println is ambiguous, both method println(int...) and method println(Object...) match

Q-1:

novv hovv cannot this call be resolVed vvhen one is Object & the other is int|a primitiVe datatype ?

A-1:

the Que has a fault. it isn't "int" it's "int[]" an object thus there is ambiguity if to call (Object...) or (int...) if there has been a method like : void println(int o) { ... ... } there couldn't be any ambiguity.

Q-2:

is it because i haVe passed an array of type int ?

A-2:

it is due to int[] because there is a method that can accept int array as its argument ie, (int...) Version as vvell as there is a method that can accept an array object as its argument ie, (Object...) Version

Q-3:

i can understand that an array is an object thus it goes both vvays but vvhen a more specifically defined method for int[] is there then should not it be resolVable ?

A-3:

Of course if a more specific Version is there that vvill be called eg, betvveen belovv giVen 2 the String Version must be called int xyz(String s) { ... } int xyz(Object o) { ... }

Q-4:

can i haVe some vvay to println() each element of array of primitiVe-datatypes as vvell as Objects ?

A-4:

yes i discoVered it as belovv :

public static void println(Object ... o) {

    for (Object obj : o)
        System.out.println(obj);
}

public static void println(int[] o) {

    for (int obj : o)
        System.out.println(obj);
}

UPDATE :

sorry there's my mistake.

it gaVe the error message for println(1, 2); NOT for println(i); //hovv on earth did i not see the line-no for the error!!!

but again it created nevv doubts....

please see this code..

class demo {

public static void println(Object ... o) {

    System.out.println("Object...");

    for (Object obj : o)
        System.out.println(obj);
}

//public static void println(int[] o) { // method-1
public static void println(int ... o) { //method-2

    System.out.println("int...");

    for (int obj : o)
        System.out.println(obj);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int i[] = {1 ,2};
    println(i); //this vvorks fine
    println(new int[] {1, 2}); //this vvorks fine
    println(3, 4); //this raises compile-time-error of ambiguous call
}

}

novv if i use "method-1" instead of method-2 eVerything vvorks fine and outputs :

int...

1

2

int...

1

2

Object...

3

4

the nevv question here is :

vvhy vvould not method-2 just vvork for the last statement ?

and vvhy it vvorks for method-1 ?

vvhen i use method-1 the last statement produces :

Object...

1

2

vvhich is to me not "understandable" because for that to happen the println(Object... has to be called and it can only be called in one circumstance if the passed argument behaVes as an Object

and the only Object here there can be is that vve haVe "an int array"

and if that is an int array ie, {3, 4} its elements are integers not Objects

and if they are premitiVe datatypes hovv can "for (Object obj : o)" vvork ?

thank you for helping :)

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closed as off-topic by Cole Johnson, Uwe Plonus, mishik, DarkDust, Sebastian Aug 7 '13 at 10:39

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

9  
are two "v"'s next to each other equivalent to a "w"? –  Steven V Aug 6 '13 at 14:52
    
Which Java version are you using? –  Rohit Jain Aug 6 '13 at 14:55
    
@StevenV If that's a serious question: no. And I've started twice to edit that question and got knocked out by other edits. –  Richard Sitze Aug 6 '13 at 14:56
    
AFAIK Java does not allow function overloading so you can't define multiple functions with the same name. –  Mihai Stancu Aug 6 '13 at 14:56
4  
This question appears to be off-topic because it contains multiple questions. –  Cole Johnson Aug 6 '13 at 19:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The signature public static void println(Object ... o) really just takes a plain old Object[]. The ... just tell the compiler to allow the syntactic sugar that turns println("hello", "world") into println(new String[]{"hello", "world"}). But, since it just takes an Object[] as its argument, you can also invoke it with the non-syntactic-sugar form of just passing in an Object[].

Well, String[] is a subclass of Object[], so when you pass your String[] in, it's interpreted as that non-sugar form. On the other hand, int[] is not a subclass of Object[], since int is a primitive and not an object. Therefore, the invocation does trigger the sugar form; what you're really doing there is int[] i = {1, 2}; println(new Object[] { i }).

Arrays in Java don't have good string representation -- they just use the default Object.toString, which is to print the object's class and reference's hash.

EDIT:

@Rohit Jain points out that the "reference to println is ambiguous" error doesn't happen, and I've confirmed that with javac. See this example.

share|improve this answer
    
That wasn't immediately obvious; very good explanation. +1. –  christopher Aug 6 '13 at 15:09
1  
No need to provide two different methods. The overloading works pretty fine. There is no ambiguity at least in Java 7 –  Rohit Jain Aug 6 '13 at 15:10
    
It looks like @Rohit Jain's right that the overloading works fine. I updated my answer and linked to an example. If you're still seeing that error, it might help to post a complete example. –  yshavit Aug 6 '13 at 15:51
    
yes you 2 are correct .. @RohitJain and yshaVit. –  Ankur Aug 6 '13 at 19:08

You have

public static void println(Object ... o) {

and

public static void println(int ... o) {

Either of these methods are applicable for an int[] argument. For the first, the entire array will be treated as a single object and passed as a single argument. For the second, the array contents will be treated as the variable arguments themselves.

Let's say you have an int[] v = {a,b,c}. The first method can be called as println(v) (since v is an Object) but the second method can also be called as println(a,b,c), since the int array is compatible with the int varargs.

There is an ambiguity here, which results in a compilation error.

Now to address you previous question:

it prints garbage Values! why ?

Because, as described, passing an int[] to a method with an Object ... argument treats the array as one object, and arrays don't override toString().


As an aside, see Arrays.toString().

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I guess you didn't read the whole question. –  Rohit Jain Aug 6 '13 at 14:53
    
@RohitJain I added some more –  arshajii Aug 6 '13 at 14:57
System.out.println(Arrays.toString(myArray));
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1  
I guess you didn't read the whole question. –  Rohit Jain Aug 6 '13 at 14:54

If it's a 1-dimention array, use:

System.out.println(Arrays.toString(o));

If it's a multi-dimentional array, use:

System.out.println(Arrays.deepToString(o));

Otherwise it will print this: o.getClass().getName() + ' @' + Integer.toHexString(o.hashCode()), as per documentation.

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You may find this useful - it takes the Object[1] containing the int[] at [0] and turns it into an Integer[]. I hope I understood your question.

/**
 * Can rebox a boxed primitive array into its Object form.
 * 
 * Generally I HATE using instanceof because using it is usually 
 * an indication that your hierarchy is completely wrong.
 * 
 * Reboxing - however - is an area I am ok using it.
 *
 * Generally, if a primitive array is passed to a varargs it
 * is wrapped up as the first and only component of an Object[].
 *
 * E.g.
 *
 * public void f(T... t) {};
 * f(new int[]{1,2});
 *
 * actually ends up calling f with t an Object[1] and t[0] the int[].
 *
 * This unwraps it and returns the correct reboxed version.
 *
 * In the above example it will return an Integer[].
 *
 * Any other array types will be returned unchanged.
 *
 * @author OldCurmudgeon
 */
public class Rebox {
  public static <T> T[] rebox(T[] it) {
    // Default to return it unchanged.
    T[] result = it;
    // Special case length 1 and it[0] is primitive array.
    if (it.length == 1 && it[0].getClass().isArray()) {
      // Which primitive array is it?
      if (it[0] instanceof int[]) {
        result = rebox((int[]) it[0]);
      } else if (it[0] instanceof long[]) {
        result = rebox((long[]) it[0]);
      } else if (it[0] instanceof float[]) {
        result = rebox((float[]) it[0]);
      } else if (it[0] instanceof double[]) {
        result = rebox((double[]) it[0]);
      } else if (it[0] instanceof char[]) {
        result = rebox((char[]) it[0]);
      } else if (it[0] instanceof byte[]) {
        result = rebox((byte[]) it[0]);
      } else if (it[0] instanceof short[]) {
        result = rebox((short[]) it[0]);
      } else if (it[0] instanceof boolean[]) {
        result = rebox((boolean[]) it[0]);
      }
    }
    return result;
  }

  // Rebox each one separately.
  private static <T> T[] rebox(int[] it) {
    T[] boxed = makeTArray(it.length);
    for (int i = 0; i < it.length; i++) {
      boxed[i] = (T) Integer.valueOf(it[i]);
    }
    return boxed;
  }

  private static <T> T[] rebox(long[] it) {
    T[] boxed = makeTArray(it.length);
    for (int i = 0; i < it.length; i++) {
      boxed[i] = (T) Long.valueOf(it[i]);
    }
    return boxed;
  }

  private static <T> T[] rebox(float[] it) {
    T[] boxed = makeTArray(it.length);
    for (int i = 0; i < it.length; i++) {
      boxed[i] = (T) Float.valueOf(it[i]);
    }
    return boxed;
  }

  private static <T> T[] rebox(double[] it) {
    T[] boxed = makeTArray(it.length);
    for (int i = 0; i < it.length; i++) {
      boxed[i] = (T) Double.valueOf(it[i]);
    }
    return boxed;
  }

  private static <T> T[] rebox(char[] it) {
    T[] boxed = makeTArray(it.length);
    for (int i = 0; i < it.length; i++) {
      boxed[i] = (T) Character.valueOf(it[i]);
    }
    return boxed;
  }

  private static <T> T[] rebox(byte[] it) {
    T[] boxed = makeTArray(it.length);
    for (int i = 0; i < it.length; i++) {
      boxed[i] = (T) Byte.valueOf(it[i]);
    }
    return boxed;
  }

  private static <T> T[] rebox(short[] it) {
    T[] boxed = makeTArray(it.length);
    for (int i = 0; i < it.length; i++) {
      boxed[i] = (T) Short.valueOf(it[i]);
    }
    return boxed;
  }

  private static <T> T[] rebox(boolean[] it) {
    T[] boxed = makeTArray(it.length);
    for (int i = 0; i < it.length; i++) {
      boxed[i] = (T) Boolean.valueOf(it[i]);
    }
    return boxed;
  }

  // Trick to make a T[] of any length.
  // Do not pass any parameter for `dummy`.
  // public because this is potentially re-useable.
  public static <T> T[] makeTArray(int length, T... dummy) {
    return Arrays.copyOf(dummy, length);
  }
}

You can then use it like:

public StringBuilder add(StringBuilder s, T... values) {
  // Remember to rebox it in case it's a primitive array.
  for (T v : Rebox.rebox(values)) {
    add(s, v);
  }
  return s;
}
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