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Suppose I have an array

import numpy as np
x=np.array([5,7,2])

I want to create an array that contains a sequence of ranges stacked together with the length of each range given by x:

y=np.hstack([np.arange(1,n+1) for n in x])

Is there some way to do this without the speed penalty of a list comprehension or looping. (x could be a very large array)

The result should be

y == np.array([1,2,3,4,5,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,1,2])
share|improve this question
    
do you mean an array with a different number of rows/cols for each col/row? –  Saullo Castro Aug 6 '13 at 15:05
    
Can you show an example of the result you are looking for? The current code for y doesnt work because elements of the numpy array will be different lengths. –  Ophion Aug 6 '13 at 15:48
    
The result should be an array. Sorry for the errors in the original code! Should be fixed now –  dlm Aug 6 '13 at 15:52
    
What is the a maximum length of x and maximum of x? Also is x unique? –  Ophion Aug 6 '13 at 16:11
    
If you are planning on iterating over this, maybe turn it into a generator so you don't have to make it all at once and store it in memory. It may not be much faster, but it won't happen all at once. –  gggg Aug 6 '13 at 16:32

2 Answers 2

First idea; prevent multiple calls to np.arange and concatenate should be much faster then hstack:

import numpy as np
x=np.array([5,7,2])

>>>a=np.arange(1,x.max()+1)
>>> np.hstack([a[:k] for k in x])
array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1, 2])

>>> np.concatenate([a[:k] for k in x])
array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1, 2])

If there are many nonunique values this seems more efficient:

>>>ua,uind=np.unique(x,return_inverse=True)
>>>a=[np.arange(1,k+1) for k in ua]
>>>np.concatenate(np.take(a,uind))

array([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1, 2])

Some timings for your case:

x=np.random.randint(0,20,1000000) 

Original code

#Using hstack
%timeit np.hstack([np.arange(1,n+1) for n in x])
1 loops, best of 3: 7.46 s per loop

#Using concatenate
%timeit np.concatenate([np.arange(1,n+1) for n in x])
1 loops, best of 3: 5.27 s per loop

First code:

#Using hstack
%timeit a=np.arange(1,x.max()+1);np.hstack([a[:k] for k in x])
1 loops, best of 3: 3.03 s per loop

#Using concatenate
%timeit a=np.arange(1,x.max()+1);np.concatenate([a[:k] for k in x])
10 loops, best of 3: 998 ms per loop

Second code:

%timeit ua,uind=np.unique(x,return_inverse=True);a=[np.arange(1,k+1) for k in ua];np.concatenate(np.take(a,uind))
10 loops, best of 3: 522 ms per loop

Looks like we gain a 14x speedup with the final code.

Small sanity check:

ua,uind=np.unique(x,return_inverse=True)
a=[np.arange(1,k+1) for k in ua]
out=np.concatenate(np.take(a,uind))

>>>out.shape
(9498409,)

>>>np.sum(x)
9498409
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Both answers look good. I think your second answer works for my use case of x with large length, but small maximum value. –  dlm Aug 6 '13 at 16:56

You could use accumulation:

def my_sequences(x):
    x = x[x != 0] # you can skip this if you do not have 0s in x.

    # Create result array, filled with ones:
    y = np.cumsum(x, dtype=np.intp)
    a = np.ones(y[-1], dtype=np.intp)

    # Set all beginnings to - previous length:
    a[y[:-1]] -= x[:-1]

    # and just add it all up (btw. np.add.accumulate is equivalent):
    return np.cumsum(a, out=a) # here, in-place should be safe.

(One word of caution: If you result array would be larger then the possible size np.iinfo(np.intp).max this might with some bad luck return wrong results instead of erroring out cleanly...)

And because everyone always wants timings (compared to Ophion's) method:

In [11]: x = np.random.randint(0, 20, 1000000)

In [12]: %timeit ua,uind=np.unique(x,return_inverse=True);a=[np.arange(1,k+1) for k in ua];np.concatenate(np.take(a,uind))
1 loops, best of 3: 753 ms per loop

In [13]: %timeit my_sequences(x)
1 loops, best of 3: 191 ms per loop

of course the my_sequences function will not ill-perform when the values of x get large.

share|improve this answer
    
Really demonstrates how slow concatenate is. When I was timing my data it was the majority of the final codes time. +1! –  Ophion Aug 6 '13 at 19:26
    
Yes, this is exactly the sort of numpy voodoo I was looking for. :) –  dlm Aug 6 '13 at 20:36

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