Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have to write a dynamic sql cursor where there are several possibilities in which the select query will be generated. Hence I am chosing dynamic and I am Using DBMS_SQL package to dynamically create a cursor and dynamically fetch the data.

However , Result set is going to be huge . around 11GB (there are 2.4 million records and the select statement will be approx 80 cols long assumning about 50Byte varchar per column)

Hence I cannot open the cursor at once . I want to know if there is a feature wherein i can fetch the data from the curosr keeping the curosr open for Blocks of say 1000 records at time(I will have to do this dynamically)

Please find the code attached which only fetches and prints the value of the columns (one sample case ) I want to use bul collect here \

Thanks

---------------code sample--------------------------------------
--create or replace type TY_DIMDEAL AS TABLE OF VARCHAR2(50) ;
create or replace procedure         TEST_PROC (po_recordset out sys_refcursor)
as


  v_col_cnt   INTEGER;
  v_ind       NUMBER;
  rec_tab     DBMS_SQL.desc_tab;
  v_cursor    NUMBER;
  lvar_output number:=0;
  lvar_output1 varchar2(100);
  lvar_output3 varchar2(100);
  lvar_output2 varchar2(100);
  LVAR_TY_DIMDEAL TY_DIMDEAL;
 lvarcol varchar2(100);
begin
  --
  LVAR_TY_DIMDEAL := TY_DIMDEAL();
  lvar_output1 := '';

  v_cursor := dbms_sql.open_cursor;
  dbms_sql.parse(v_cursor, 'select to_char(Field1) , to_char(fiel2) , to_char(field3) from table,table2 ', dbms_sql.native);
  dbms_sql.describe_columns(v_cursor, v_col_cnt, rec_tab);
  FOR v_pos in 1..rec_tab.LAST LOOP

  LVAR_TY_DIMDEAL.EXTEND();
  DBMS_SQL.define_column( v_cursor, v_pos ,LVAR_TY_DIMDEAL(v_pos),20);
  END LOOP;
 -- DBMS_SQL.define_column( v_cursor, 1 ,lvar_output1,20);
  --DBMS_SQL.define_column( v_cursor, 2 ,lvar_output2,20);
 --DBMS_SQL.define_column( v_cursor, 3 ,lvar_output3,20);
  v_ind := dbms_sql.execute( v_cursor );

  LOOP
    v_ind := DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS( v_cursor );
    EXIT WHEN v_ind = 0;
    lvar_output := lvar_output+1;
   dbms_output.put_line ('row number '||lvar_output)  ;

    FOR v_col_seq IN 1 .. rec_tab.COUNT LOOP  
    LVAR_TY_DIMDEAL(v_col_seq):= '';
     DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE( v_cursor, v_col_seq,LVAR_TY_DIMDEAL(v_col_seq));
    dbms_output.put_line (LVAR_TY_DIMDEAL(v_col_seq));

   END LOOP;



  END LOOP;

end TEST_PROC;
share|improve this question
1  
The title already mentions bulk collect; are you just missing the limit clause to makes the batches smaller? There's an article about this here. – Alex Poole Aug 6 '13 at 15:49
    
@AlexPoole How to apply bulk collect to cursor constructed with DBMS_SQL and dynamic number of columns? – ThinkJet Aug 7 '13 at 8:38
    
@ThinkJet - I believe you can use bulk column definitions, but I don't have en example to hand. It might be easier to use execute immediate though, and convert a ref cursor to get the metadata if it's needed. I guess limit would imply that, which I hadn't really meant to do... – Alex Poole Aug 7 '13 at 8:46
1  
@AlexPoole Thank you for pointing to such possibility. Examples can be found at Oracle documentation for DBMS_SQL package. – ThinkJet Aug 7 '13 at 9:38

Fetching data from a cursor in blocks of reasonable size, while keeping the cursor open, is one of PL/SQL Best Practices.

The above document (see Code 38 item) sketches an approach for when the select list is not known until runtime. Basically:

  1. Define an appropriate type to fetch results into. Let's assume that all the returned columns will by of of type VARCHAR2:

    -- inside DECLARE
    Ty_FetchResults IS TABLE OF DBMS_SQL.VARCHAR2_TABLE;
    lvar_results Ty_FetchResults;
    
  2. Before each call to DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS, call DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY to enable batch fetching.

  3. Call DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS to fetch 1000 rows from the cursor.
  4. Call DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE to copy the fetched data into your result array.
  5. Process the results, record by record, in a FOR loop. Don't worry about the number of fetched records: if there are records to process, the FOR loop will run correctly; if the result array is empty, the FOR loop will not run.
  6. Exit from the loop when the number of fetched records is less than the expected size.
  7. Remember to DBMS_SQL.CLOSE the cursor.

Your loop body should look like this:

LOOP
  FOR j IN 1..v_col_cnt LOOP
    DBMS_SQL.DEFINE_ARRAY(v_cursor, j, lvar_results(j), 1000, 1);
  END LOOP;

  v_ind := DBMS_SQL.FETCH_ROWS(v_cursor);

  FOR j IN 1..v_col_cnt LOOP
    lvar_results(j).DELETE;
    DBMS_SQL.COLUMN_VALUE(v_cursor, j, lvar_results(j));
  END LOOP;

  -- process the results, record by record
  FOR i IN 1..lvar_results(1).COUNT LOOP
    -- process a single record...
    -- your logic goes here
  END LOOP;

  EXIT WHEN lvar_results(1).COUNT < 1000;
END LOOP;

-- don't forget: DBMS_CLOSE(v_cursor);

See also Doing SQL from PL/SQL: Best and Worst Practices.

share|improve this answer

LIMIT CLAUSE CAN COME TO RESCUE!

PL/SQL collections are essentially arrays in memory, so massive collections can have a detrimental effect on system performance due to the amount of memory they require. In some situations, it may be necessary to split the data being processed into chunks to make the code more memory-friendly. This “chunking” can be achieved using the LIMIT clause of the BULK COLLECT syntax.

YOU CAN USE LIMIT CLAUSE AFTER BULK COLLECT INTO CLAUSE TO LIMIT YOUR RS. AFTER YOU EXCEED TO LIMIT YOU CAN FETCH REMAINING ROWS. SEE THIS ARTICLE http://www.dba-oracle.com/plsql/t_plsql_limit_clause.htm

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.