Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I used SFINAE many times successfully. To detect if a class provides a function is not a problem. My current problem seems to be the opposite of his problem! Instead of also detect the derived methods, I would prefer to detect only the class' methods. It seems to be related to the fact that the method is a template.

Is it possible to detect a class template method? I tried to instantiate the template with a type which shouldn't harm, but no luck.

struct A { template<class T> void Func( T ) {}; };
struct B :A {};

template< class T >
struct CheckForFunc
{
    typedef char(&YesType)[1];
    typedef char(&NoType)[2];
    template< class U, void (U::*)( int ) > struct Sfinae;

    template< class T2 > static YesType Test( Sfinae<T2,&T2::Func>* );
    template< class T2 > static NoType  Test( ... );
    static const bool value = sizeof(Test<T>(0))==sizeof(YesType);
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    // gives "1"
    std::cout << "Value A=" << CheckForFunc< A >::value << std::endl;
    // doesn't compile!
    std::cout << "Value B=" << CheckForFunc< B >::value << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Error message:

error: ‘&A::Func’ is not a valid template argument for type ‘void (B::*)(int)’ because it is of type ‘void (A::*)(int)’

Note that this SFINAE works very well with template methods, just not with derivation! Bad is that it doesn't just detect wrong, it fails compilation.

How to write a SFINAE test without using a 'sample' type (here: the int)?

Edit: Sorry, C++03 only! And LLVM was fine with it, also VS2008, just not GCC and QNX (version I would have to look tomorrow).

Edit2: Didn't know about Coliru! Very cool, here is the error!

share|improve this question
1  
Why not just use Test(void (T2::*)(int) = nullptr) and sizeof(Test<T>())? –  Kerrek SB Aug 6 '13 at 16:56
1  
Your code compiles, using clang++. I find that strange! I think it is a bug in clang! –  Nawaz Aug 6 '13 at 17:05
    
Interesting thought to use default argument. Is nullptr C++11? –  Borph Aug 6 '13 at 19:00
    
The actual question is whether Sfinae<T2,&T2::Func>* leads to a substitution failure or not (latter case: code does not compile) for T2 == B. I tend to say it is a substitution failure, in that case, clang++ is right and g++ is wrong. The problem behind it, as David Rodríguez pointed out, is that a conversion from void (A::*)(int) to void (B::*)(int) is not allowed in the context of a template argument. –  dyp Aug 6 '13 at 19:21
    
@KerrekSB: This wouln't be a test for T2::Func(), would it? DyP: Yes, seems to be the problem, but how to test then with GCC? –  Borph Aug 6 '13 at 19:41
show 1 more comment

3 Answers

The issue is not related to a class template, which is resolved correctly, but to a weird quirk in the address-of-member expression. In particular, with the types:

struct base { void foo(); };
struct derived : base {};

The expression &derived::foo is of type void (base::*)() which might or not be intuitive.

As of a test to detect the presence of a member function template, I don't have an answer. You cannot take the address of a template, but you could probably create a fake inaccessible type and try to call the function with that type. The only way that the class could have a function taking that type would be if the function itself is a template. You might want to use this inside of an unevaluated expression to avoid odr-using the template function with your type.

share|improve this answer
1  
"The expression &derived::foo is of type void (base::*)()" This is correct, but I don't think it's the problem here. The OP wants to detect a member function template that is not inherited (as far as I understand the OP). The expression &A::Func has no type yet [over.over], but is matched with both void (A::*)(int) and void (B::*)(int). –  dyp Aug 6 '13 at 17:37
    
@DyP: &A::Func cannot be matched with void (B::*)(int) on a template, as it requires a conversion from pointer-to-member of base to pointer-to-member of derived which is not one of the valid conversions for a non-type template argument. You are right in that I skipped the part where &A::Func is a set of overload resolution candidates, but all of them are void (A::*)(T) for some type T (i.e. A is fixed accross the whole set. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 6 '13 at 17:46
    
Yes, I thought that as well at first, but there's a comment in [over.over]: "[Note: That is, the class of which the function is a member is ignored when matching a pointer-to-member-function type. —end note]" –  dyp Aug 6 '13 at 17:48
2  
@DyP: Yes, that quote supports my point. The type of the member is ignored for overload resolution, so it tries to match void (derived::*)(int) and void (base::*)(int) is selected by overload resolution even if base != derived as the type holding the member is ignored. At this point (after overload resolution) and according to 5.3.1/3 the type of the expression is determined to be void (base::*)(int) not void (derived::*)(int) even though the latter was used to drive overload resolution. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 6 '13 at 17:55
    
Note that outside of a template this is perfectly fine, as there is an implicit conversion from void (base::*)(int) to void (derived::*)(int), but that conversion is not one of the allowed conversions when matching a non-type template argument. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 6 '13 at 17:57
add comment

I would use this fix:

Sfinae<T2, decltype(std::declval<T2>().Func(0))> 

That is, use the type of the expression obj.Func(0) and pass it to Sfinae class template.

Here is the complete code with the fix:

#include <iostream>
#include <utility>

struct A { template<class T> void Func( T ) {}; };

struct B : A {};

struct C {};

template< class T >
struct CheckForFunc
{
    typedef char(&YesType)[1];
    typedef char(&NoType)[2];
    template< class, class > struct Sfinae;

    template< class T2 > static YesType Test( Sfinae<T2, decltype(std::declval<T2>().Func(0))> * );
    template< class T2 > static NoType  Test( ... );
    static const bool value = sizeof(Test<T>(0))==sizeof(YesType);
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::cout << "Value A=" << CheckForFunc< A >::value << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Value B=" << CheckForFunc< B >::value << std::endl;
    std::cout << "Value C=" << CheckForFunc< C >::value << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Output:

Value A=1
Value B=1
Value C=0

I added class C to this demo.

Online Demo. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
I think the OP wants the output Value B=0: "Instead of also detect the derived methods, I would prefer to detect only the class' methods" –  dyp Aug 6 '13 at 17:34
1  
@DyP: That doesn't make sense to me (neither do I think that is possible), because base methods, once inherited, becomes class methods of the derived class. –  Nawaz Aug 6 '13 at 17:37
1  
See David Rodríguez' answer. For non-overloaded functions (and non-templates), the type of the expression &B::Func is void (A::*)(int). Don't know why the OP needs that check, though. –  dyp Aug 6 '13 at 17:38
    
@DyP: Correct. Nawaz: According to this impossible. –  Borph Aug 6 '13 at 19:11
add comment

If you know the exact template parameters the member function template should have, this works: (Note it uses some C++11 features that could be replaced by C++03 features)

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

struct A { template<class T> void Func( T ) {} };
struct B :A {};

template< class T >
struct CheckForFunc
{
    typedef char(&YesType)[1];
    typedef char(&NoType)[2];

    template< class T2 > static YesType Test(
        typename std::enable_if<
            std::is_same<void (T::*)(int), decltype(&T2::template Func<int>)>{},
            int
        >::type );
    template< class T2 > static NoType  Test( ... );
    static const bool value = sizeof(Test<T>(0))==sizeof(YesType);
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    // gives "1"
    std::cout << "Value A=" << CheckForFunc< A >::value << std::endl;
    // doesn't compile!
    std::cout << "Value B=" << CheckForFunc< B >::value << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Output:

Value A=1
Value B=0

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.