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I'm building my first Rails app and I'm using JQuery to make an ajax POST request to update a resource. I'm sending _method: "PATCH" and the correct controller is being executed:

  def update
    @buddyship = Buddyship.find(params[:id])
    if @buddyship.involve? current_user && @buddyship.update(buddyship_params)
      render json: { success: true }
    else
      render json: { success: false }, :status => 500
    end
  end

I'm testing the standard use case first, where the relationship does involve the current user, so the first part of the condition evaluates to true. The second does too, I know it because I tried

def update
  @buddyship = Buddyship.find(params[:id])
  bool = @buddyship.update(buddyship_params)
  logger.debug "bool: "+bool.to_s
  if @buddyship.involve? current_user && bool
    render json: { success: true }
  else
    render json: { success: false }, :status => 500
  end
end

and in the logs I got bool: true. Plus, the record still gets updated in the database. Still somehow I get Internal Server Error instead of success.

If I simply use and instead of &&, everything works as I expected.

if @buddyship.involve? current_user && @buddyship.update(buddyship_params)

I understand that and has lower precedence than &&, and that the assignment operator = is in between. But in this context this doesn't seem to be relevant, after all there's only one operator! So it's not competing for precedence with anything else. It seems pretty straightforward. What am I getting wrong???

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

&& has strong precedence and and has low precedence.

@buddyship.involve? current_user && @buddyship.update(buddyship_params)

is the same as

@buddyship.involve?(current_user && @buddyship.update(buddyship_params))

and

@buddyship.involve? current_user and @buddyship.update(buddyship_params)

is the same as

@buddyship.involve?(current_user) and @buddyship.update(buddyship_params)
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Damn, how naive of me to think there was only one possibility. That was it, thanks! –  Ariel Aug 6 '13 at 17:11
    
Isn't @buddyship.involve?(current_user) ... identical in meaning to @buddyship.involve? current_user ... for all values of ...? Did you mean (@buddyship.involve? current_user)? (I know no ruby - this is just a guess!) –  Eric Aug 6 '13 at 17:12
    
@Eric I have no idea what you are writing about, but all three expressions you wrote are equivalent. –  sawa Aug 6 '13 at 17:14
    
What I'm asking here is whether @buddyship.involve?(current_user) && foo() is any different from @buddyship.involve? current_user && foo(). Does that mean adding a single space changes the meaning? @buddyship.involve? (current_user) && foo() –  Eric Aug 6 '13 at 17:15
2  
@Eric Yes, they are different. A parenthesis has two meanings in Ruby. If it is adjacent to a method, then it means the delimiters for arguments. If there are spaces in between, it means to give higher precedence. foo(a) && b unambiguously means that the argument for foo is a. foo (a) && b does not. Unlike what is in your mind, my addition of parentheses clarifies the difference. –  sawa Aug 6 '13 at 17:19

Use braces to wrap them as the spaces may break logic.

Change this

if @buddyship.involve? current_user && @buddyship.update(buddyship_params)

To

if (@buddyship.involve? current_user) && (@buddyship.update buddyship_params)
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Don't use braces ({}), use parenthesis (()). –  the Tin Man Aug 6 '13 at 17:52
1  
Also, I'd say @buddyship.involve?(current_user) && @buddyship.update(buddyship_params) is more appropriate than (@buddyship.involve? current_user) && (@buddyship.update buddyship_params). –  the Tin Man Aug 6 '13 at 18:28

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