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temp.bgf

ATOM     218  CB   ASN 1   34   -7.84400  -9.19900  -5.03100 C_3    4 0 -0.18000 0   0
ATOM     221  CG   ASN 1   34   -7.37700  -7.83400  -4.55200 C_R    3 0  0.55000 0   0
ATOM     226  C    ASN 1   34   -9.18200 -10.62100  -6.58300 C_R    3 0  0.51000 0   0
ATOM     393  CB   THR 2   69   -3.33000  -7.97700  -7.72000 C_3    4 0  0.14000 0   0
ATOM     397  CG2  THR 2   69   -4.75300  -8.54400  -7.67200 C_3    4 0 -0.27000 0   0
ATOM     401  C    THR 2   69   -2.58000  -9.55700  -5.85500 C_R    3 0  0.51000 0   0
ATOM     417  CB   THR 2   71    1.99100  -9.86800  -2.77000 C_3    4 0  0.14000 0   0
ATOM     421  CG2  THR 2   71    2.86300 -10.15400  -1.55700 C_3    4 0 -0.27000 0   0
ATOM     425  C    THR 2   71   -0.19100 -10.14200  -1.62900 C_R    3 0  0.51000 0   0
ATOM     492  CB   CYS 2   77   -5.17100 -14.77100   4.04000 C_3    4 0 -0.11000 0   0
ATOM     495  SG   CYS 2   77   -6.29600 -14.88500   2.59500 S_3    2 2 -0.23000 0   0
ATOM     497  C    CYS 2   77   -4.65100 -13.75800   6.12000 C_R    3 0  0.51000 0   0
ATOM    2071  CB   SER 7  316   -3.87300  -2.15900   1.02300 C_3    4 0  0.05000 0   0
ATOM    2076  C    SER 7  316   -4.79700  -1.16500  -1.10800 C_R    3 0  0.51000 0   0

target.bgf

ATOM     575  CB   ASP 2   72   -2.80100  -7.45000  -2.09400 C_3    4 0 -0.28000 0   0
ATOM     578  CG   ASP 2   72   -3.74900  -6.45900  -1.31600 C_R    3 0  0.62000 0   0
ATOM     581  C    ASP 2   72   -3.19300  -9.62400  -0.87900 C_R    3 0  0.51000 0   0

I got two files of data. The first file contains data for the residues I want to calculate the distance to. The second file contains the coordinates for the target residue.

I want to calculate the minimum distance between the two quantities (i.e. ASP and the residues in the temp.bgf). I haven't been able to come up with an optimal way to store the x,y,z values and compare the distance in temp.bgf.

There have been questions as to how the calculation should be done. Here is the idea I have

 @asp_atoms
 @asn_atoms
 $asnmin, aspmin
 foreach $ap (@asp_atoms)
 {
     foreach $an (@asn_atoms)
     {
         dist = dist($v..$g...);
         if($dist < $min)
         {
                $min = $dist;   
         }
    }
 }

I hope that clarifies questions as to how to implement the code. However, the problem I am having is how to store the values in the array and traverse through the file.

Also, to clarify how exactly(i.e. what numbers will be used for distance, here is an example of what I want to do).

For the ASP CB atoms with the following coordinates: -2.80100 -7.45000 -2.09400 I want to calculate the distance between the ASN CB, ASN CG, ASN C atoms. The minimum is the value printed out. Unfortunately, I don't have an exact value as to what that minimum would be, but I have to print out values less than 5 units of distance. Then, the ASP CG atoms distance would be calculated to all the ASN atoms to see the min. So I am trying to find the min distance here.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can solve this by simply splitting each row from your file on white spaces, then storing the results in arrays of arrays and then slicing out only the parameters you need in loops (in this case x,y,z). This is not a complete answer to your problem but it should give you an idea of how this can be accomplished.

open (my $temp,"<","temp.bgf");

open (my $target,"<","target.bgf");

my @temps = create_ar($temp);
my @targets = create_ar($target);

sub create_ar {
    my $filehan = shift;
    my @array;

foreach (<$filehan>) {
    push  @array,[split(/\s+/,$_)];
}
    return @array;
}


foreach my $ap (@targets) {

my ($target_X,$target_Y,$target_Z) =  @{$ap}[6,7,8];

    foreach my $an (@temps) {

my ($temp_X,$temp_Y,$temp_Z) = @{$an}[6,7,8];

...

    }

}

share|improve this answer
    
Could you clarify what $ap(@targets) means syntatically. I am a beginner to perl. –  user2605011 Aug 6 '13 at 19:17
    
It's part of the syntax of a foreach loop. foreach (@targets) { [...] } loops through the elements of @targets and sets $_ to the current element in each iteration. foreach $ap (@targets) { [...] } uses $ap for each element instead of $_. –  Adi Inbar Aug 6 '13 at 19:39
    
Do not use this answer until you confirm that fields are defined by spaced based gaps, not position coordinates. If each field occupies a set number of spaces in a line, this script may subtly fail without you noticing... –  wespiserA Aug 6 '13 at 23:12

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