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I'm trying to center two divs that are using "display: inline-block;" but whenever I try to, it's not working. If I remove the inline-block class. It gets centered but displayed down the page instead of across. Example of code:

#news {
    background-image: url('../img/news.png');
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    height: 152px;
    width: 320px;
    display: inline-block;
}
#conBody {
    background-image: url('../img/conBody.png');
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    height: 260px;
    width: 321px;
    margin: 0px auto 0px auto;
    text-align: right;
    display: inline-block;
    padding: 0px;
}

HTML :

<div id="conBody">

</div>
<div id="conBody">

</div>
<div id="conBody">

</div>
<div id="news">

</div>
<div id="news">

</div>
<div id="news">

</div>

Looks like this:

preview

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I would make a container div first and have everything else within that div be position:relative; or like you have it display:inline-block; and it should be centered –  Keith Aug 6 '13 at 17:59
    
You should avoid adding the same ID tag to a html page more than once. This is what CSS classes are for –  cronoklee Aug 6 '13 at 18:07
    
There is no need to define their positions manualy –  Andreyco Aug 6 '13 at 18:07

3 Answers 3

You could contain everything within a wrapper. If you set the wrapper to display: table; then you can canter it even if you do not have a set width.

DEMO http://jsfiddle.net/kevinPHPkevin/nXj7c/

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In this example you are centering wrapper instead of inner elements. Works but seems 'hacked' to me... –  Andreyco Aug 6 '13 at 18:11
    
There's nothing wrong with centering a wrapper - this is a good solution. It's actually the same as mine with display:table added to replace width:500px –  cronoklee Aug 6 '13 at 18:14
1  
This isn't a hack, it's common practice. –  Vector Aug 6 '13 at 18:15

You need to use text-align property.

<div class="news-parent">
    <div class="news">
    a
    </div>
    <div class="news">
    b
    </div>
    <div class="news">
    c
    </div>
</div>

.news-parent{
    background: #ccc;
    text-align: center;
}
.news {
    width: 20%;
    display: inline-block;
    background: #666;
    text-align: left;
}

Live example here: http://jsfiddle.net/7KFNR/

Advice: do not use IDs (#news) - ID is a unique identifier. Simply said: one ID can be found only once on single page. Use classes for rules that apply for multiple elements.

Remember: you need to specify width for div.news elements

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1  
text-align is for aligning text. It should not be used for layout if at all possible IMO as it causes knock-on issues. For example, adding it to a high level block element as you've done means that you have to undo it on every child element with text-align:left. –  cronoklee Aug 6 '13 at 18:33

You should wrap everything in a div and display it in the centre rather than trying to display each div in the centre individually.

You can centre a block element using CSS:

margin:0 auto;

Here is a fiddle with a barebones demo: http://jsfiddle.net/nRAyQ/3/

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1  
Why the downvote? This is the industry standard way to do this. –  cronoklee Aug 6 '13 at 18:09
    
OP needs to center multiple 'boxes' in one row - not 1 box per row. I think that's why. You missed the point with the answer –  Andreyco Aug 6 '13 at 18:12
    
It makes no difference how many boxes there are in the row - this method will work fine. It centres all content in the wrapper. I've updated the fiddle in my answer to demonstrate this. –  cronoklee Aug 6 '13 at 18:18
    
... yeah, it centers all boxes in wrapper, one per row. Even after update, it's not bulletproof. See link jsfiddle.net/nRAyQ/4 –  Andreyco Aug 6 '13 at 18:26
    
You just changed the width of the wrapper without changing the width of the children. If you change them both, it works fine. Honestly, this is the standard way to achieve the desired result. –  cronoklee Aug 6 '13 at 18:29

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