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I'm writing my own small multiprecision library, and while writing the method for subtraction, I encountered some weird error. Here is the code block I wrote for for multiprecision subtraction:

/* subtraction */
 for (; p_aReverseIter != a.m_elements.rend(); ++p_aReverseIter, ++p_bReverseIter) 
 {
  temp = static_cast<__int64>(static_cast<__int64>(p_aReverseIter->m_Value) - 
         static_cast<__int64>(p_bReverseIter->m_Value) + 
         (carry));
  --- debug output-  
  p_aReverseIter->m_Value = static_cast<unsigned int>(temp & 0xffffffff); 
  carry = static_cast<unsigned long>(temp >> 32);

 }

p_aReverseIter->m_Value is 32 bit unsigned int, while a,b are BigInt. Values are stored inside a vector in Big Endian style. temp is __int64 and carry should work as 32 bit unsigned long.

Let's say we substract b from a, a > b (unsigned subtraction), but all the 32bit words in b are larger then a. This routine produces following output:

a = 0xfefefefe (10 elem) 0xfefefefe (10 elem) 0xfefefefe (10 elem) 
0xfefefefe (10 elem) 

b = 0x12 (2 elem) 0x12121212 (9 elem) 0x12121212 (9 elem) 0x12121212 
(9 elem) 0x12121212 (9 elem)

a[i]: 12121212 
b[i]: fefefefe 
old carry: 0 
temp = a - b + carry: ffffffff13131314
Value: 13131314 
new carry: ffffffffffffffff

a[i]: 12121212 
b[i]: fefefefe 
old carry: ffffffff 
temp = a - b + carry: 13131313 
Value: 13131313 
new carry: 0

a[i]: 12121212 
b[i]: fefefefe 
old carry: 0 
temp = a - b + carry: ffffffff13131314 
Value: 13131314 
new carry: ffffffffffffffff

a[i]: 12121212 
b[i]: fefefefe 
old carry: ffffffff 
temp = a - b + carry: 13131313 
Value: 13131313 
new carry: 0
...

But the carry should always be 0xfffffffff. Everytime it is zero, the result is '13131314' which is wrong. Now lets change the carry from unsigned long to unsigned __int64 and

carry = static_cast<unsigned long>(temp >> 32);

to

carry = static_cast<unsigned __int64>(temp >> 32);

Now the carry is always calculated correctly and is set to 0xffffffff. But rightshifting a 64bit value of 2^32 should always produce a 32 bit result.

My question is: To understand the different results, what am I missing?

Thank you very much.

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Small remark: You can use standard long long instead of nonstandard __int64 –  denisenkom Nov 27 '09 at 14:13
    
long long isn't standard in C++ either. It is defined in C++99, and is planned to be added to C++ in C++0x, but it's not there yet. –  jalf Nov 27 '09 at 15:00
    
what type is temp? –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 27 '09 at 15:05
    
@Zyrkon: Sorry, but your decription makes no sense. If we are doing unsigned subtraction and A > B, as you say, all words in B cannot be greater than all words in A. Also, in your example your element-by-element data is swapped with regards to array data (A and B swapped). Please, put things in order before we can start making sense of all this. –  AndreyT Nov 27 '09 at 15:18
    
This should be community wiki as an example how to not use c++. Regarding to your question, don't mix __int64, long, and int. If you need types with an exact defined width, use __int64 consequently (or better uin64_t from an external stdint.h, which is missing on vc++) and avoid long and even unsigned int at all. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 27 '09 at 15:26

2 Answers 2

What's sizeof(long) in your environment? I suspect if you test you'll find it's 4, i.e. your unsigned long are actually 32-bit values.

share|improve this answer
    
sizeof long is 4 by definition. sizeof int is the one that varies –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 27 '09 at 15:03
    
@Ruben: By definition? What "definition" are you talking about? –  AndreyT Nov 27 '09 at 15:11
    
My compiler says sizeof(long) == 8. You just discovered a remarkable bug, must be hidden for 10+ years if you consider how long gcc has been used to produce 64-bit software. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 27 '09 at 15:16
  p_aReverseIter->m_Value = static_cast<unsigned int>(temp & 0xffffffff); 
  carry = static_cast<unsigned long>(temp >> 32);

Don't hardcode values like these. You're not guaranteed that an unsigned long is any particular size (and it often won't be 64-bit as you assume). So bit shifting as well as your bitwise 'and' have to take that into account. You could replace the 32 with something like sizeof(unsigned long)*8 perhaps. And instead of 0xffffffff, ~0L would do the trick, or perhaps -1 if you're feeling brave. (It'll work as long as signed ints are represented by two's complement, which is usually the case, but it's not guaranteed by the standard)

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