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var users = from u in db.UserProfiles select new UsersViewModel{ 
                            UserName = u.UserName,
                            UserId = u.UserId,
                            IsDisabled = u.IsDisabled,
                            Role = Roles.GetRolesForUser(u.UserName).FirstOrDefault()
                        };

I would like to select the roles from the database and create a list of UsersViewModel. However Entity Framework is trying to execute the projection on the SQL side, where there is no equivalent to Roles.GetRolesForUser.

What would be an alternative to this or how am I suppose to execute any method inside the query?

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Are you getting user roles from database? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Aug 6 '13 at 18:33
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The easiest is to get the data you want from SQL, then after the query executes, iterate through the results and populate the additional details from the function in your code.

Example:

var users = (from u in db.UserProfiles select new UsersViewModel{ 
                            UserName = u.UserName,
                            UserId = u.UserId,
                            IsDisabled = u.IsDisabled
                        }).ToList();
foreach(var user in users){
    user.Role = Roles.GetRolesForUser(u.UserName).FirstOrDefault();
}

The key to remember here is to separate out what you're doing (understanding the separation of concerns in your architecture). Take care of the SQL first, then augment the data from other sources, in your case the Role Provider.

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Well, actually this will not execute GetRolesForUser in LINQ to Entities :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Aug 6 '13 at 18:35
    
@lazyberezovsky actually, nothing will. LINQ to Entities cannot execute functions that are in your C# code as it must translate the entire LINQ statement (or Lambda Expression) in SQL. Entity Framework is just an ORM. –  CodeMonkey1313 Aug 6 '13 at 18:37
    
Yes, this a correct answer. Also consider to use AsEnumerable –  Sergey Berezovskiy Aug 6 '13 at 18:41
    
Wow thanks I think this is much cleaner. –  bman Aug 7 '13 at 6:03
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You can force the query to execute before creating the ViewModels by adding ToList():

var users = from u in db.UserProfiles.ToList() 
    select new UsersViewModel{ 
        UserName = u.UserName,
        UserId = u.UserId,
        IsDisabled = u.IsDisabled,
        Role = Roles.GetRolesForUser(u.UserName).FirstOrDefault()
    };

As CodeMonkey1313 noted, I strongly suggest you apply some sort of filter in your query:

var users = from u in db.UserProfiles
    .Where( x => /* apply filter here */ )
    .ToList() //Force query to execute
    select new UsersViewModel { 
        UserName = u.UserName,
        UserId = u.UserId,
        IsDisabled = u.IsDisabled,
        Role = Roles.GetRolesForUser(u.UserName).FirstOrDefault()
    };
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One thing to remember with this approach is that it can be data heavy as loading the entire UserProfiles table without a where clause or even a select clause to limit the columns returned can result in a lot of data coming back that is unnecessary –  CodeMonkey1313 Aug 6 '13 at 18:36
    
I completely agree. –  Khan Aug 6 '13 at 18:38
    
While this update is in Linq, keep in mind what this results in after compilation. It's equivalent to a foreach loop after the .ToList() method call, iterating over the results of the EF query. I mention this as Linq queries can sometimes get away from us and result in heavily looped code that performs poorly - remember O(n). –  CodeMonkey1313 Aug 6 '13 at 19:26
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You can convert your Queryable to an Enumerable that executes locally:

var users = (from u in db.UserProfiles select new UsersViewModel{ 
                        UserName = u.UserName,
                        UserId = u.UserId,
                        IsDisabled = u.IsDisabled)}
                     ).AsEnumerable()
                      .Select(u => new { 
                        UserName = u.UserName,
                        UserId = u.UserId,
                        IsDisabled = u.IsDisabled,
                        Role = Roles.GetRolesForUser(u.UserName) })
                      .FirstOrDefault()
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Two things to note. You are missing () after AsEnumerable. Also, calling FirstOrDefault will return a single user. If this were the case, you should call FirstOrDefault before AsEnumerable. –  Khan Aug 6 '13 at 18:43
    
Consider the impact of using AsEnumerable() with respect to amount of data returned by SQL. Always run a profiler to to see what SQL is created by your Linq –  CodeMonkey1313 Aug 6 '13 at 18:43
    
I added the parentheses. And you are probably right with the performance issue. But this might or might not be an issue, depending on the number of users and roles. –  FrankPl Aug 6 '13 at 18:45
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