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In Java I can cast:

List<?> j = null;
List<Integer> j2 = (List<Integer>)j;

So why does the following fail?

List<List<?>> i = null;
List<List<Integer>> i2 = (List<List<Integer>>)i;
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What's the error message? –  CyberneticTwerkGuruOrc Aug 6 '13 at 19:11
2  
This explains it so so well : stackoverflow.com/questions/3546745/… –  Sajal Dutta Aug 6 '13 at 19:24
3  
Both casts are a pretty bad idea, it's just that the first one is dubious (not provably correct), the latter one is flat out wrong. –  millimoose Aug 6 '13 at 19:30
    
What you can cast, though, is List<?> into List<List<Integer>>---because ? can stand for anything, including List<Integer>. –  Marko Topolnik Aug 6 '13 at 20:12
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3 Answers

In your 1st snippet:

List<?> j = null;
List<Integer> j2 = (List<Integer>)j;

The compiler won't give you error, because List<?> is a super type of List<Integer>, because the family of types denoted by the wildcard "?" is a superset of Integer. So you can perform the cast from List<?> to List<Integer> (A downcast, you can say), but the compiler will show you an Unchecked Warning, to save you against a cast from say - List<Date> to List<Integer>. The warning is shown, because the cast would otherwise succeed at runtime, due to type erasure.


In the 2nd case:

List<List<?>> i = null;
List<List<Integer>> i2 = (List<List<Integer>>)i;

Here you are casting from List<List<?>> (referred to by FIRST from hereon) to List<List<Integer>>(referred to by SECOND from hereon).

Since, FIRST is not a super type of SECOND, clearly because the family of types denoted by List<?> (it can be List<Long>, List<Date>, List<String> or anything) is not a super set of List<Integer>. Hence a Compiler Error.

Suggested Reading:

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Try:

List<? extends List<?>> i = null;

List<List<Integer>> i2 = (List<List<Integer>>)i;

Source (this source will reference to other great sources):

http://stackoverflow.com/a/3575895/2498729

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+1 fro the good reference. –  null Aug 6 '13 at 19:19
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I'm guessing you need to do a wildcard cast to cast it to what you want.

List<?> j = null;
List<Integer> j2 = (List<Integer>)j;

List<List<?>> i = null;
List<List<Integer>> i2 = (List<List<Integer>>) (List<?>) i;

That compiles fine. You just needed to do an additional cast just to add a little buffer.

See here: http://ideone.com/xh88lX

If you want to know why, check here

Basically, here's the relevant info Here's another way to look at it:

  • Java generics is type invariant
  • There's a conversion from Integer to Number, but a List<Integer> is not a List<Number>
  • Similarly, a List<Integer> can be capture-converted by a List<?>, but a List<List<Integer>> is not a List<List<?>>
  • Using bounded wildcard, a List<? extends Number> can capture-convert a List<Integer>
  • Similarly, a List<? extends List<?>> can capture-convert a List<List<Integer>>
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I just looked it up a little more, and found another stackoverflow post that explains why, check my edit. –  JGibel Aug 6 '13 at 19:16
    
I didn't see that till I posted, I'll still leave it up here since it provides another solution –  JGibel Aug 6 '13 at 19:20
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