Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Originally, I am working with a list with length = 2^16. However, to abstract this, I will set length = 5 in this example.

#subroutine to make undefined entries -> 0
sub zeros {
    foreach(@_) {
        if(!defined($_))    {
            $_ = 0;
        }
    }
}       
 #print out and indicies and elements of list 
    sub checking {
        print "List = \n";
        my $counter = 0;
        foreach (@_) { 
            print "index = $counter\n";
            print "$_\n";
            $counter += 1;
        }
            print "\n";
    }

Method 1: If I access different indices to edit the element, I get the following when I print out the arrays. I dont want to see blank. I want them to be 0. I have already set up a subroutine "zeros" to make undefined entries become zero. But I dont know what went wrong in my code. I have also tried "$_ += 0" for each elements of the list. I still wasnt able to get zeros for empty entries.

#method 1
@abc = ();
$abc[1] = 3;
$abc[5] = 5;
&zeros(@abc);
&checking(@abc);
List = 
index = 0

index = 1
3
index = 2

index = 3

index = 4

index = 5
5

And method 2: I can get zeros if I initialise the list like this. But as I said, I am working with very long list, I cannot definitely not initialise my list like this.

#method 2
@abc = (3,0,0,0,5);
&checking(@abc);

List = 
index = 0
3
index = 1
0
index = 2
0
index = 3
0
index = 4
5
share|improve this question
    
Can you initialise your list using @abc = (0) x 2**16 which sets it to a list of 2**16 zeroes? –  Adrian Pronk Aug 6 '13 at 20:56
2  
You should always use use strict; use warnings;. It will make your life much easier. –  TLP Aug 6 '13 at 20:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your approach is correct, but there's an issue with your zeros() function. You are calling it with @abc as a parameter, which makes a copy of that list. You then change the copy. At the end of the sub, that copy is discarded. In your checking() function, you are still using the original list.

You can fix it like this:

sub zeros {
  my @list = @_;
  @list = map { $_ // 0 } @list;
  return @list;
} 

@abc = zeros(@abc);
checking(@abc);

The trick is to return the altered list and reassign it to the original variable.

If you had used strict and warnings it would have told you about that:

Use of uninitialized value $_ in concatenation (.) or string at F:\scratch.pl line 28. List =  index = 0

index = 1 3 index = 2

index = 3

index = 4

index = 5 5

Use of uninitialized value $_ in concatenation (.) or string at F:\scratch.pl line 28. 
Use of uninitialized value $_ in concatenation (.) or string at F:\scratch.pl line 28. 
Use of uninitialized value $_ in concatenation (.) or string at F:\scratch.pl line 28.

But since you are dealing with a very big array, I would advise to use an array reference instead because the copying will be expensive.

sub zeros {
  $_ //= 0 for @{ $_[0] };
} 

zeros(\@abc);
checking(@abc);
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using // and //= –  sputnick Aug 6 '13 at 21:07
1  
Be careful: no copy from that list is made when you pass it as an argument. The original elements are aliased. –  sidyll Aug 6 '13 at 21:11
    
@sidyll: If that is the case, why is the OP's original sub zeros not working? It should alter the aliases, shouldn't it? –  simbabque Aug 6 '13 at 21:21
    
In fact @sidyll is right. perldoc.perl.org/perlsub.html explains how it works. It will only copy the values if @_ is assigned to something. –  simbabque Aug 6 '13 at 21:27
1  
@simbabque I stopped writing :-) there's one thing that I don't know, related to the way the array is initialised. It's what Adrian Pronk's answer says. If you modify an alias to an existing element, even if it's set to undef, it works, in the OP case it doesn't work because the elements didn't "existed". –  sidyll Aug 6 '13 at 21:38

Can you initialise your list using

@abc = (0) x 2**16 

which sets it to a list of 2**16 zeroes?

I tried using your zeroes method. It worked if I initialise the array like this:

@abc = (undef, 1, undef, undef, undef, 5)

So it looks like the subroutine doesn't replace array-entries that don't exist (as opposed to existing but having a value of undef)

In which case you could try extending your zeros subroutine to return the modified array and assign that back to the original array:

#subroutine to make undefined entries -> 0
sub zeros {
    foreach(@_) {
        if(!defined($_))    {
            $_ = 0;
        }
    }
    return @_;
}       

@abc = ();
$abc[1] = 3;
$abc[5] = 5;
@abc = zeros(@abc);
# Check:
print "index = $_\n$abc[$_]\n" for 0..$#abc;

Alternatively, you could pass a reference to the original array:

#subroutine to make undefined entries -> 0
sub zeroref {
    my ($array) = @_; # Expect a single argument: An array-reference
    foreach(@$array) {
        if(!defined($_))    {
            $_ = 0;
        }
    }
}       

@abc = ();
$abc[1] = 3;
$abc[5] = 5;
zeroref(\@abc); # Pass an array-reference instead
# Check:
print "index = $_\n$abc[$_]\n" for 0..$#abc;
share|improve this answer
use 5.010;
$_ //= 0 for @abc;

For pre 5.10 perls,

$_ = defined($_) ? $_ : 0 for @abc;

If you want to turn it into a function, don't return a value as the replacement is in-place:

use 5.014;
use strict;
use warnings;
use YAML;

my @abc;
$abc[1] = 3;
$abc[5] = 5;

print Dump \@abc;

map_undefined_entries_to_zeros(\@abc);

print Dump \@abc;

sub map_undefined_entries_to_zeros {
    my $array_ref = shift;
    $_ = defined($_) ? $_ : 0 for @$array_ref;
    return;
}
share|improve this answer

If you'd prefer lazy or on-demand replacement of undef elements with zeros, you can tie the array like so:

package Ad::Hoc::UndefToZero;

use Tie::Array;
our @ISA = qw(Tie::StdArray);

sub FETCH {
  my ($tied, $i) = @_;
  my $elt = $tied->SUPER::FETCH($i);
  unless (defined $elt) {
    $elt = 0;
    $tied->STORE($i, $elt);   # $tiedarray[$i] is now zero
  }
  $elt;
}

package main;

tie my @abc, 'Ad::Hoc::UndefToZero';
$abc[1] = 3;
$abc[5] = 5;

print "$abc[0]\n";  # $abc[0] now set to zero
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.