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I've got a Python module with docstrings in class methods, and a real-world example in the module docstring. The distinction is that the method-docstrings have been carefully crafted to be utterly repeatable tests, while the real-world example is just a copy'n'paste of the history from a Linux shell - which happened to invoke the python interpreter.

E.g.

"""
Real-world example:

# python2.5
Python 2.5 (release25-maint, Jul 20 2008, 20:47:25)
[GCC 4.1.2 20061115 (prerelease) (Debian 4.1.1-21)] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> from packagename import module
>>> module.show_real_world_usage()
'Hello world!'
"""

class SomeClass(object):
    def someMethod(self):
        """
        >>> 1 == 1
        True
        """

I want to run the doctest in SomeClass.someMethod, but not in the module's docstrings.

Doctest's +SKIP directive only works per line, which would mean adding 10s of lines to my real-world example. Ugly!

Is there a way to make doctest skip an entire block? A bit like <!-- ... --> in HTML?

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I agree. This is a feature that would be very useful. –  Jason R. Coombs Nov 27 '09 at 15:20

3 Answers 3

Wrap the example in a function and then skip the function call:

"""
>>> def example():
>>>    from packagename import module
>>>    module.show_real_world_usage()
>>> example() # doctest: +SKIP
'Hello world!'
"""
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I think you are missing a Colon, I think it should be # doctest: +SKIP, it wouldn't work for me without it but good work around, Thanks –  Ida N Mar 4 '13 at 18:20
    
@IdaN Yup. Directives require a colon. Thanks: docs.python.org/2/library/doctest.html#directives –  lambacck Mar 4 '13 at 18:39
up vote 4 down vote accepted

My solution has been to trim the the 3-character >>> and ... leaders where I want doctest to skip over them, making them 2-characters.

So

"""
>>> from packagename import module
>>> module.show_real_world_usage()
'Hello world!'
"""

has become

"""
>> from packagename import module
>> module.show_real_world_usage()
'Hello world!'
"""

Epydoc doesn't display this as nicely as it does doctests, but I can live with this. A skip-until-further-notice directive in doctest would be welcome though.

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If it's not an actual doctest by any means, you can just assign the value to a variable. For example,

example_usage = """
Real-world example:

# python2.5
...
"""

will cause that "test" to not be evaluated.

It might be better to use __example_usage__ (or something else surrounded by double-underscores) so that it's clear that's a "magic" variable and not a variable to be used within the context of the script.

share|improve this answer
    
Neat, but then it's also invisible to help() and epydoc. –  RobM Nov 27 '09 at 14:32
    
I'm not sure about help(), but you can just add a new field in epydoc: epydoc.sourceforge.net/epydoc.html#adding-new-fields –  Mark Rushakoff Nov 27 '09 at 14:35

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