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If I create an object in a Custom Action Filter in ASP.NET MVC in

public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
{
    DetachedCriteria criteria = DetachedCriteria.For<Person>();
    criteria.Add("stuff");

    // Now I need to access 'criteria' from the Action.....

}

is there any way I can access the object from the Action that is currently executing.

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4 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I would recommend putting it in the Route data.

    protected override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        filterContext.RouteData.Values.Add("test", "TESTING");
        base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);
    }

    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        ViewData["Message"] = RouteData.Values["test"];

        return View();
    }
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How long does an item survive for in RouteData? I only need to keep the object for the duration of the currently executing action, or at the most for the current request, if this is how route data works then this is the answer otherwise HttpContext.Items is probably better. –  reach4thelasers Nov 29 '09 at 12:07
    
RouteData is data related to the currently executing route (action). Think it as a container that represents the request url parsed and mapped according to your routing rules. –  Neal Jan 13 '10 at 2:09
    
RouteData is certainly great for doing this as I've learned today thanks to your answer here. My beautiful black & yellow MVC book here in front of me (fourth edition) doesn't mention anything about it or do anything similar to this at all in the entire chapter on filters (or at least I just haven't found it yet?). Anyway, +1 and thank you! –  Funka Mar 7 '13 at 2:25
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The better approach is described by Phil Haack.

Basically this is what you do:

public class AddActionParameterAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        base.OnActionExecuting(filterContext);

        // Create integer parameter.
        filterContext.ActionParameters["number"] = 123;

        // Create object parameter.
        filterContext.ActionParameters["person"] = new Person("John", "Smith");
    }
}

The only gotcha is that if you are creating object parameters, then your class (in this case Person) must have a default constructor, otherwise you will get an exception.

Here's how you'd use the above filter:

[AddActionParameter]
public ActionResult Index(int number, Person person)
{
    // Now you can use number and person variables.
    return View();
}

I am "a bit" too late to the party, but this IMO is a nicer approach.

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Incidentally, his name is Phil Haack. "Haacked" is just something he uses because it's a funny play on his name. –  Andrew Barber Nov 28 '12 at 18:30
    
Haha. Sorry, fixed it :) Thank you. –  niaher Nov 29 '12 at 5:47
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You could use the HttpContext:

filterContext.HttpContext.Items["criteria"] = criteria;

And you can read it in the action:

[YourActionFilter]
public ActionResult SomeAction() 
{
    var criteria = HttpContext.Items["criteria"] as DetachedCriteria;
}
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1  
I was thinking about using HttpContext.Items[] and its an acceptable solution as it will be cleared out at the end of the request. I wasn't sure if there was a place I could store stuff that exists only for the duration of the action. –  reach4thelasers Nov 29 '09 at 12:08
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Set item in ViewData or of a viewmodel if you pass it as a parameter into your action. Here I set the property of a ViewModel

public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
 {
     ViewModelBase viewModel = null;
     foreach (object parameter in filterContext.ActionParameters.Values)
     {
         if (parameter is ViewModelBase)
         {
             viewModel = (ViewModelBase)parameter;
             break;
         }
     }
     if(viewModel !=null)
     {
         viewModel.SomeProperty = "SomeValue";
     }
 }


    public ActionResult About(ViewModelBase model)
    {
      string someProperty= model.SomeProperty;
}

EDIT Here is the untyped version I think you prefer:

   public override void OnActionExecuting(ActionExecutingContext filterContext)
    {
        filterContext.Controller.ViewData.Add("TestValue", "test");

    }

       [FilterWhichSetsValue]
        public ActionResult About()
        {
            string test = (string)ViewData["TestValue"];
            return View();
        }
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Thanks for your suggestion. My actions don't take ViewModelBase as a parameter though, and I would prefer not to introduce it just to solve my problem. –  reach4thelasers Nov 29 '09 at 12:10
    
See the edited post for the untyped version. I would still use the first version. Maybe the parametername just sounds to bad. It can be any class and doesnt have to be the class of the typed view. –  Malcolm Frexner Nov 29 '09 at 17:36
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