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i don't understand why the compiler warn me about passing a incompatible pointer type in this code: (in this context what are the difference between void* and void**) (i don't know if this make some difference but i use the gnu99 c "version")

void someFunc(void ** foo) {
    printf("%s\n", *foo);
}

int main() {

    char * text = "some text";
    someFunc(&text);

    return 0;
}

and in this not

void someFunc(void * foo) { 
    printf("%s\n", foo);
}

int main() {

    char * text = "some text";
    someFunc(text);

    return 0;
}

Thanks in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

void * is a type that is implicitly convertible to and from any object pointer type. void ** isn't - so while you can assign a char * to a void *, you can not do the same with char ** and void **.

The reason is that they are incompatible types: char ** points to a char *, void ** points to a void *, so their base types don't match.

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ok, understood, so when i have a swap function like void swap(<type> ** a, <type> ** b) to swap pointer instead the values. If i want make it generic (type insensitive or whatever) what is the correct way to do it? –  Sasquash Aug 7 '13 at 7:06
    
@Sasquash Sorry, I don't get what you mean by that. It's enough to have T * in order to swap two value of type T. –  user529758 Aug 7 '13 at 7:08

To fix your code in the second example, you can do one of the following:

// Solution A, preferred:
void someFunc(char * foo) { 
    printf("%s\n", foo);
}

int main() {

    char * text = "some text";
    someFunc(text);

    return 0;
}

In A you are telling the compiler that the parameter being passed is a pointer to a char. I haven't tried solution B, should work but why use voids if they are NOT absolutely necessary.

// Solution B, should work but a purist might object:
void someFunc(void * foo) { 
    printf("%s\n", foo);
}

int main() {

    char * text = "some text";
    someFunc( (void *) text);

    return 0;
}

In this question there is no obvious reason to use a double ptr, so Solution A for your second example is probably the way to go.

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