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so this is my code

function dl(name){
 this.name=name;
 this.getInfo();
};
dl.prototype={
 getInfo:function(){
  this.x=new XMLHttpRequest;
  this.x.open('GET',this.name);
  this.bind=this.setInfo.bind(this);
  this.x.addEventListener('load',this.bind,false);
  this.x.send();
 },
 setInfo:function(){
  this.info=this.x.response;
  this.x.removeEventListener('load',this.bind,false);
  delete this.bind;
  delete this.x;
  this.insertDOM();
 }
};

I use function dl(){} approach because i want to have access to everything with this.

I use prototype because when i create many new dl(SOMEURL) it won't touch the memory.

But yeah as it has many xhr2 functions inside i need to find the best way to return everything correctly.

So using xhr2 normally is wonderfull...

function ajax(a,b,c){ //url,function,placeholder
 c=new XMLHttpRequest;c.open('GET',a);c.onload=b;c.send();
}    
//example onload function    
function b(){ //don't even need event....
 console.log(this.response)
}

Good: i pass only the function reference (no arguments,no strange that,me vars..)

Bad: in a class i loose the this pointer to my class

so i started with defining the xhr object inside my class

this.x=new XMLHttpRequest;

and used bind to pass this on my next function this.setInfo

but to remove the eventlistener later i need to define a new variable that contains the binded function.

this.bind=this.setInfo.bind(this);

and i really hate that.(i'm trying to use as many variables as possible and using low memory)

i don't even know if this really removes the event.

other solution i'm thinking of is to refer the this to the xhr2 object.

function dl(name){
 this.name=name;
 this.getInfo(this.name);
};
dl.prototype={
 getInfo:function(){
  var x=new XMLHttpRequest;
  x.that=this;
  x.open('GET',this.name);
  x.addEventListener('load',this.setInfo,false);
  x.send();
 },
 setInfo:function(){
  this.that.info=this.response;
  this.removeEventListener('load',this.setInfo,false);
  this.that.insertDOM();
  delete this.that;
 }
};

A. is this.that only a reference or does it fill the memory?

i need to be shure that after each of this functions i delete/clear every var that i don't need anymore to help the garbage collector.

B. Are there any better solutions in writing this type of javascript class??

ps.:is there a more elegant wayto init the first function inside dl?


What is this class for??

it's a download manager for chrome

How it works??

i put a download link into a input field

the class adds a new dl(SOMEURL) to an array

retrieves the file info with a php cUrl script.

stores the file info inside the class

and executes another xhr with retrieves the first chunk of the file based on it's size.

the chunk will be appended to a window.webkitrequestfilesystem file previously created.

then it continues to loop over xhr requests until all chunks are downloaded and appended to the filesystem.

Saving the file offset status into window.LocalStorage gives me the opportunity to resume downloads later.

share|improve this question
    
There are a lot of incorrect assumptions throughout this long question; it's very challenging to answer for that reason. –  Pointy Aug 6 '13 at 22:24
    
cool if you have an answer... what you mean with incorrect assumtions? my english is very bad.. sry –  cocco Aug 6 '13 at 22:27
    
i also could not find the right title to explain what i mean... the point is to create a lib (function(){})() which does not have problems with other libs and to have full access to every event and variable inside that.but a big problem is a function which does not return the this pointer –  cocco Aug 6 '13 at 22:44
    
There's no need to remove an event listener from an XHR object. The garbage collector will figure out how to reclaim that. In general, it's not really worth your time to out-guess what the garbage collector needs until you actually start running into memory problems. –  Pointy Aug 6 '13 at 22:44
    
if i create the xhr object and define inside the this referrer... what happens to the garbade collector? like in solution 2 –  cocco Aug 6 '13 at 22:45

2 Answers 2

Ok, i've got the script to work, but I changed a few things. Firstly, I took put x.that and replaced it with a local variable (instance) that can be used inside onreadystatechange events. Secondly I added an onreadystatechange event, allows you to run a function when the ajax request loads, I also modified the event listeners so that they would work, but I recommend using the onreadystatechange. Thirdly, I added a few things to test and the code works on Chrome. Finally, I changed setInfo so that it would take the response of the ajax request as a parameter. I think that's everything I did, so heres the code:

function dl(name){
    this.name = name;
    this.getInfo(this.name);
};
dl.prototype = {
    getInfo:function(){
        var instance = this;
        var x = new XMLHttpRequest();
        x.open('GET', this.name, false);

        // onreadystatechange event
        x.onreadystatechange = function(){
            if(x.readyState == 4){
                if(x.status == 200){
                    instance.setInfo(x.responseText);
                } else {
                    /*
                        there was a network failure 
                        (File Not Found, Internal Server Error ...)
                    */
                }
            }
        }

        // if you really want to use event the listeners you had previously:
        this.request = x;
        x.addEventListener('load', function(){
            instance.setInfo(x.responseText);
        } ,false);

        x.send();
    },
    setInfo:function(response){
        this.info = response;

        // if you used the event listeners
        this.request.removeEventListener('load', function(){
            instance.setInfo(x.responseText);
        } ,false);
        delete this.request;

        // this.insertDOM();
        // I just added this for testing purposes only
        document.body.innerHTML = this.info;
    }
};

// added for testing
window.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function(){
    var dlTest = new dl("filetoget")
}, false);

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
1. 'var instance = this' is a referrer to this which contains alot of stuff and fills up the whole memory. 2.'setInfo:function(response)' i choosed 'this' to have access to every parameter i need without passing it trough a function. 3. 'onreadystatechange' i use 'onload' for testing,because it's short and works perfect on chrome. 4. Your executing instance.setInfo 2 times. 5. You can't remove anonymous functions with removeEventListener –  cocco Aug 6 '13 at 23:21
    
both my solutions work... but i need to get back the referrer to the new created dl() object inside the onload/onreadystatechange function the proper way.i think binding a function or passing this.that or a instance you did is not a good approach. –  cocco Aug 6 '13 at 23:24
    
el.addEventListener('readystatechange',f,false) is the same thing as el.onreadystatechange.. except that with evlist.. you can add multiple listeners and also have the appropriate removeEventListener. –  cocco Aug 6 '13 at 23:31
    
Oh, in that case, you can use arguments.callee.caller from inside the dl() function and that should give you the function dl was called from. Or you could find some way to use a callback function of some sort. –  user1877408 Aug 6 '13 at 23:32
    
I think that using the onreadystaechange = function() looks nicer though –  user1877408 Aug 6 '13 at 23:33

Here is the new code:

function dl(name, callback) {
    this.name = name;
    this.callback = callback;
    this.getInfo();
}
dl.prototype = {

 getInfo:function(){
  var x=new XMLHttpRequest;
  x.that=this;
  x.open('GET',this.name,false);
  x.addEventListener('load',this.setInfo,false);
  x.send();
 },
 setInfo:function(){
  this.that.info=this.response;
  this.removeEventListener('load',this.setInfo,false);
  //this.that.insertDOM();  
  // when you need to refer back
     this.that.callback(this.responseText);

  delete this.that;
 }   
}

function call() {
    var a = 1;
    var b = 2;

    new dl("filetoget", function (response) {
        console.log(a + b);
        console.log(response);
    });
}

call();
share|improve this answer
    
yeah this is basically the code of my second solution.it works ... but what about the refecence created in the xhr object... will it go straigth to the garbage collector or will it end somewhere hidden filling the memory continuosly? –  cocco Aug 7 '13 at 0:03
    
As far as I know, changing this.that.callback(this.responseText); to this.that.callback(this); will send a copy of the request, not the actual request. I'll just do a quick test –  user1877408 Aug 7 '13 at 0:06
    
Yeah, that works for me –  user1877408 Aug 7 '13 at 0:07

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