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TCP_NODELAY is an option to enable quick sending of TCP packets, regardless of their size. This is very useful option when speed matters, however, I'm curious what it will do to this:

Socket socket = [some socket];
socket.setTcpNoDelay(true);
OutputStream out = socket.getOutputStream();
out.write(byteArray1);
out.write(byteArray2);
out.write(byteArray3);
out.flush();

I tried to find what flush actually does on a SocketOutputStream, but as far as I know now, it doesn't do anything. I had hoped it would tell the socket "send all your buffered data NOW", but, unfortunately, no it doesn't.

My question is: are these 3 byte arrays sent in one packet? I know you don't have much control over how TCP constructs a network packet, but is there any way to tell the socket to (at least try to) pack these byte arrays, so network overhead is avoided? Could manually packing the byte arrays and sending them in one call to write help?

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3  
"TCP_NODELAY .. is useful when speed matters." NO. It's useful when responsiveness matters (getting a byte sent to be received as promptly as possible). TCP_NODELAY can reduce overall throughput, by sending the aggregate data relatively INEFFICIENTLY. Buffering is good: whenever/wherever possible. IMHO... –  paulsm4 Aug 6 '13 at 22:23
2  
SUGGESTION: Get a copy of wireshark and trace the packets actually sent for a couple of test socket programs. –  paulsm4 Aug 6 '13 at 22:24
    
Yes, that is what I meant. ;-) I know it's inefficient, but in my case, responsiveness is more important than waiting for enough data. However, for the case the question is about, I want to optimize it, because sending the single byte arrays doesn't make much sense, it's the content from all of them that matters. –  AyCe Aug 6 '13 at 22:26
    
@AyCe: Then send the data all at once. Takes a few extra microseconds to combine them, and that's assuming not-small buffers. That time is nothing compared to how long network traffic can take. –  cHao Aug 6 '13 at 22:33
    
@cHao That would be my current approach, but I was curious if there are better ways, searching did not yield anything, so I asked this question. –  AyCe Aug 6 '13 at 22:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

My question is: are these 3 byte arrays sent in one packet?

As you have disabled the Nagle algorithm, almost certainly not, but you can't be 100% sure.

I know you don't have much control over how TCP constructs a network packet, but is there any way to tell the socket to (at least try to) pack these byte arrays

Yes. Don't disable the Nagle algorithm.

so network overhead is avoided? Could manually packing the byte arrays and sending them in one call to write help?

Yes, or simpler still just wrap the socket output stream in a BufferedOutputStream and call flush() when you want the data to be sent, as per your present code. You are correct that flush() does nothing on a socket output stream, but it flushes a BufferedOutputStream.

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As I stated in a comment already, I need TCP_NODELAY for my app, so disabling is not an option for me. I actually use BufferedOutputStream for sending already, does this guarantee the data to be sent only once flush() is called? –  AyCe Aug 6 '13 at 23:04
    
Yes, if the BufferedOutputStream buffer is big enough to hold all the pending data. (8k by default.) However if you're expecting to receive the data all together, think again. There is no guarantee of that. You still have to loop at the receiver until you've got everything you need, or use DataInputStream.readFully() if you know the length expected. –  EJP Aug 6 '13 at 23:49
1  
Okay, nice! Of course I know I cannot receive it as a "packet" as I could with UDP. All these byte arrays are single messages, but they only make sense once the last of them is received. So it would be pointless to send them as single packets. –  AyCe Aug 7 '13 at 0:45
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@EJP - excellent answer, on all points! –  paulsm4 Aug 7 '13 at 2:30

Could manually packing the byte arrays and sending them in one call to write help?

Yes, send them all in a single call to write. This will maximize the chances that your bytes will be sent in a single packet.

Of course, you can never know, since there are too many variables involved - different OSs and lots of different networking gear between you and your peer, but if you give the OS the ability to pack everything together, it will generally try to.

If you disable nagle and make seperate system calls (remember, the OS controls the sockets, not your appliation or java), you're asking the OS to send them individually. The OS has no idea you're about to call write again with some more data.

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Thanks for the info! I'm merging the byte packets, and that seems to work pretty good. –  AyCe Aug 6 '13 at 23:49
    
@AyCe if you think this answers your question better than the other answer, I'd appreciate if you would switch the accepted answer. –  xaxxon Aug 7 '13 at 1:36
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You answer is great, you explain the separation of OS/Java for Sockets and also give an answer to my secondary question, while answering my primary question (if these 3 byte arrays will likely get sent in one packet) indirectly as well. EJP answers both questions as well, but also gives the advice to use BufferedOutputStream, so I feel like that answer is more complete :) –  AyCe Aug 7 '13 at 13:23
    
@AyCe ok, no problem. –  xaxxon Aug 7 '13 at 22:03

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