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int main()
{
    //Define Variables

    char studentName;

    //Print instructions to fill the data in the screen
    printf("Please type in the Students name:\n");
    scanf("%s", &studentName);
    printf("\n\n%s", &studentName);

    return 0;
}

Seeing the above code, I am only printing to screen out the first word when I type in a sentence.

I know it is a basic thing, but I am just starting with plain C.

share|improve this question
    
On which system, with which compiler, are you running this? –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 7 '13 at 0:45
    
I was running this on xcode 4.6 as it was the one available at the time, but need to also do this in a Windows environment. –  Jeff Kranenburg Aug 7 '13 at 3:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Read scanf(3) documentation. For %s is says

   s      Matches a sequence of non-white-space characters; the next
          pointer must be a pointer to character array that is long
          enough to hold the input sequence and the terminating null
          byte ('\0'), which is added automatically.  The input string
          stops at white space or at the maximum field width, whichever
          occurs first.

So your code is wrong, because it should have an array for studentName i.e.

char studentName[32];
scanf("%s", studentName);

which is still dangerous because of possible buffer overflow (e.g. if you type a name of 32 or more letters). Using %32s instead of %s might be safer.

Take also the habit of compiling with all warnings enabled and with debugging information (i.e. if using GCC with gcc -Wall -g). Some compilers might have warned you. Learn to use your debugger (such as gdb).

Also, take the habit of ending -not starting- your printf format string with \n (or else call fflush, see fflush(3)).

Learn about undefined behavior. Your program had some! And it misses a #include <stdio.h> directive (as the first non-comment significant line).

BTW, reading existing free software code in C will also teach you many things.

share|improve this answer
    
I doubt that the compiler would have warned about the scanf call. &studentName is of type char*, which is what scanf expects for "%s". In fact a single char object can hold a string -- as long as it's empty (consisting only of the terminating '\0'). –  Keith Thompson Aug 7 '13 at 1:11

There are three problems with your code:

  • You are writing a string into a block of memory allocated for a single character; this is undefined behavior
  • You are printing a string from a block of memory allocated for a single character - also an undefined behavior
  • You are using scanf to read a string with spaces; %s stops at the first space or end-of-line character.

One way to fix this would be using fgets, like this:

char studentName[100];

//Print instructions to fill the data in the screen
printf("Please type in the Students name:\n");
fgets(studentName, 100, stdin);
printf("\n\n%s", &studentName);

return 0;
share|improve this answer
    
it should be gets(studentName) only. –  sgun Aug 7 '13 at 0:45
    
@sgun: No, gets is deprecated and dangerous! –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 7 '13 at 0:50
    
@sgun No, gets is a recipe for buffer overruns: it does not know how much memory is allocated to studentName, so if the input is longer, it starts writing past the allocated memory, into the stack. That's how most of the virus attacks happen. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 7 '13 at 0:51
1  
@sgun That's why I edited the answer 4 minutes ago :) –  dasblinkenlight Aug 7 '13 at 0:54
2  
@BasileStarynkevitch: gets is not merely deprecated. As of the 2011 ISO C standard, it's been removed from the language altogether. –  Keith Thompson Aug 7 '13 at 1:12

Try scanf("%[^\n]", &studentName); instead of scanf("%s", &studentName);

share|improve this answer
1  
Still possible buffer overflow.... –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 7 '13 at 10:07

This is happening because %s stops reading the input as soon as a white space is encountered.

To avoid this what you can do is declare an array of the length required for your string.

Then use this command to input the string:-

scanf("%[^\n]s",arr);

This way scanf will continue to read characters unless a '\n' is encountered, in other words you press the enter key on your keyboard. This gives a new line signal and the input stops.

int main()
{
    //Define Variables

    char studentName[50];

    //Print instructions to fill the data in the screen
    printf("Please type in the Students name:\n");
    scanf("%[^\n]s", &studentName);
    printf("\n\n%s", &studentName);

    return 0;
}

Alternatively you can also use the gets() and puts() method. This will really ease your work if you are writing a code for a very basic problem.

[EDIT] : As dasblinkenlight has pointed out...I will also not recommend you to use the gets function since it has been deprecated.

int main()
    {
        //Define Variables

        char studentName[50];

        //Print instructions to fill the data in the screen
        printf("Please type in the Students name:\n");
        gets(studentName); printf("\n\n");
        puts(studentName);

        return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Hi I have changed you to best answer - was a very good detailed and easy explanation. –  Jeff Kranenburg Aug 7 '13 at 19:23
    
@JeffKranenburg "Naked" %s in scanf is dangerous, because end-users of your program can cause undefined behavior simply by typing more than 49 characters at the prompt. Try it - type a string long enough, and see it crash (demo). If you are set on using %s, you need to put a limit in it. Moreover, gets has been deprecated for years, and is now on the verge of being removed from the standard C library as a major security risk. You should never use gets, let alone recommending it to others. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 7 '13 at 19:28

make the changes below and try it. I added [80] after the studentName definition, to tell the compiler that studentName is an array of 80 characters (otherwise the compiler would treat it as only one char). Also, the & symbol before studentName is not necessary, because the name of the array implicitly implies a pointer.

int main()
{
  //Define Variables

  char studentName[80];

  //Print instructions to fill the data in the screen
  printf("Please type in the Students name:\n");
  scanf("%s", studentName);
  printf("\n\n%s", studentName);

  return 0;

}

share|improve this answer
    
Should be scanf("%80s", studentName); or else possible buffer overflow. –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 7 '13 at 0:57
    
Yes, good point. –  mti2935 Aug 7 '13 at 9:47

Your problem is here

char studentName;

It is a char, not a string.

Try:

  1. Define it as an array of chars like char studenName[SIZE];.
  2. allocating memory dynamically using malloc:

.

char buffer[MAX_SIZE];
scanf("%s", &buffer);
char * studentName = malloc (sizeof(buffer) + 1);
strcpy (studentName , buffer);
share|improve this answer
    
Still possible buffer overflow, if the user type MAX_SIZE+1 letters. –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 7 '13 at 0:54
    
I'm pretty sure that this is not a concern for the OP –  Ran Eldan Aug 7 '13 at 1:40
    
MAX_SIZE is not defined in <stdio.h>, so I was guessing you would #define MAX_SIZE 16 –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 7 '13 at 2:00
    
Of course MAX_SIZE does not defined anywhere. My answer is not dealing with buffer overflow, because as i said, i'm pretty sure that it is not a concern for the OP. It can be inferred from the type and the level of the question. as you can see many other answer didn't mention how to prevent buffer overflow either. Sometimes providing too many unnecessary details blurring the answer. –  Ran Eldan Aug 7 '13 at 2:56

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