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Here is the problem, when I defined a interface like this:

package mypackage;
public interface Ainterface {
  int VAL = 6;
}

and then I defined a class like:

public class Aclass implements Ainterface {
  private String[] str = new String[VAL];
  public static void main(String[] args) { ... }
}

When I compiler the program, there show the error message: can't find the symbol "VAL".

symbol: VAL

position: Aclass

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Make the variable private or something. If you don't provide a specifier, I'm pretty sure it assumes package-private, and Aclass could very well be in a different package –  Dennis Meng Aug 7 '13 at 3:33
5  
@DennisMeng No. All members of an interface are public and static automatically. –  Naetmul Aug 7 '13 at 3:34
1  
Ah, interfaces do it differently? Some food for thought for me I guess –  Dennis Meng Aug 7 '13 at 3:35
1  
It does compile fine assuming they are in same package, do you have classes in different packages? if so all answers below are not valid here. –  Nambari Aug 7 '13 at 3:39
    
If you remove the mypackage declaration, this will work just fine. I'm pretty sure that your issue is with the way that you're using package. Please post more code. –  Steve P. Aug 7 '13 at 3:49

4 Answers 4

When I compiler the program, there show the error message: can't find the symbol "VAL".

Is that the only compiler error message? If so, please goto wtf;.

If not, are any of the other compiler error messages equivalent to the compiler saying that it also can not find Ainterface? If so, your issue is simple. It appears that either Aclass is in a different package, or you intended for it to be in the same package. In the former case, you need import mypackage.Ainterface. The latter case, you need to put Aclass in the same package with package mypackage.

wtf:

Can you please produce the smallest working example that shows the issue? Here's the problem: I have to work really hard to reproduce your issue, and it's very unlikely to be the issue that you're experiencing.

There are few possibilities.

a. Ainterface and Aclass are in the same package. In this case, there should be no issue.

Ainterface.java:  

package mypackage;

public interface Ainterface {
  int VAL = 6;
}

Aclass.java

package mypackage;

public class Aclass implements Ainterface {
  private String[] str = new String[VAL];
  public static void main(String[] args) { }
}

b. Ainterface and Aclass are in different packages. In this case, there must be an import mypackage.Ainterface import statement in the java source file for Aclass. In this case, there should be no issue.

package mypackage;

public interface Ainterface {
  int VAL = 6;
}

Aclass.java:

package myotherpackage;
import mypackage.Ainterface;

public class Aclass implements Ainterface {
  private String[] str = new String[VAL];
  public static void main(String[] args) { }
}

In both cases, the code will compile as is. Neither of these produce the issue, and they are the only two possibilities that make sense. There is a third possibility. Please tell me it is not this. You have two Ainterface defined, one in one package, one in another and Aclass sits in the same package as one of the definitions that doesn't define VAL:

Ainterface.java:

package mypackage;

public interface Ainterface {
  int VAL = 6;
}

Ainterface.java:

package myotherpackage;

public class Ainterface {

}

Aclass.java:

package myotherpackage;

public class Aclass implements Ainterface {
  private String[] str = new String[VAL];
  public static void main(String[] args) { }
}

This will produce the error. And, to be clear, this can happen on accident. Say you define Ainterface and put it in mypackage. Say you define Aclass and you don't put it in the same package and you forget to import mypackage.Ainterface. If you're using an IDE like Eclipse, you'll get an error message that Ainterface can not be resolved to a type and you'll have three quick fixes available: "Import 'Ainterface' (mypackage)", "Create interface 'Ainterface'", "Fix project setup...". If you accidentally clicked the second option, you'll end up in this case. But that's just silly, that can not be what you intended. So, help us help you.

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1  
Though theory is correct, I think if classes are in same package they compiled fine without explicit interface name. I guess OP issue is they are in different package and missing imports or something else. –  Nambari Aug 7 '13 at 3:40
    
Well, you're on to something. But if he's missing an import then the line Aclass implements Ainterface would be offending to the compiler too. And he didn't say that's the case. –  Jason Aug 7 '13 at 3:58
    
Downvoter, please explain? –  Jason Aug 7 '13 at 4:10
    
I am not downvoter and very very rare I do that, I agree that Aclass implement Ainterface also should complain, there is something fishy. –  Nambari Aug 7 '13 at 4:12
1  
I see. Thanks, @Jason. Thank you. –  meng hang Aug 7 '13 at 7:15

You should refer VAL in a static way as all the variables defined in an interface is by default public, static and final. This should work:

  private String[] str = new String[Ainterface.VAL];
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This is not the issue. Put them in the same package xor put them in different packages and have Aclass import mypackage.Ainterface and in either case it will compile just fine as-is. –  Jason Aug 7 '13 at 4:09

An interface can contain constant declarations in addition to method declarations. All constant values defined in an interface are implicitly public, static, and final. Once again, these modifiers can be omitted. Check this for more details.

So in order to access it use Ainterface.VAL(Since variables defined in interface are static).

private String[] str = new String[Ainterface.VAL];
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This works fine if present in same package but if you want to that files to be in different package then you can do either of things.

Option 1:

Import mypackage;

in Aclass.java file

Option 2:
Or change VAL with Ainterface.VAL then statement become

private String[] str = new String[Ainterface.VAL];
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If import mypackage were the issue, then the line Aclass implements Ainterface would be offending line. –  Jason Aug 7 '13 at 4:07
    
@jason yes both lines gives error.but I tried every aspects when you import package then you can accesss Val without error. And I agreed with your ans and explanation. This is the only case when he get an error. So +1 for that –  Ashish Aggarwal Aug 7 '13 at 4:10
    
Right, that's my point. Either both lines offend, in which case the fix is trivial, or neither do except in a very weird case like I outlined in my answer. –  Jason Aug 7 '13 at 4:16

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