Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want one to explain the following function accurately.

void ToBin(int n){
  if (n>1)
     ToBin( n/2 );
  printf( "%d", n%2 );
}

For example:
If I'm entered 7, what's happen (the function behavior) to convert to binary 111.

Please I want step by step explanation to I understand.


Edit
The same function but prints the result more clearly.

void ToBin( int n ){
   printf("%d/2= %d -> %d\n", n, n/2 ,n%2);
   if (n>1)
      ToBin( n/2 );
}
share|improve this question
    
Please google how to convert number to boolean and try to compare those steps with your method ToBin.....u will hv better understanding by your own... r u confused with call of ToBin within ToBin (recursion)?? –  Nitin Agrawal Aug 7 '13 at 5:11
    
@Nitin Agrawal: I know the way in standard math, but I don't know how to do by using programming. –  Lion King Aug 7 '13 at 5:14
    
this is why in my comment i asked r u confused with call of ToBin within ToBin .....try to read about recursive functions and...More over many answers are available for u to understand your original question in detail...happy coding... :-) –  Nitin Agrawal Aug 7 '13 at 5:42
    
@Nitin Agrawal: Thanks, for your advice. –  Lion King Aug 7 '13 at 5:45

10 Answers 10

up vote 5 down vote accepted

With 7 in particular:

First, n = 7, so n > 1. Thus, ToBin is called again on n / 2 = 3.

Now, n = 3, so n > 1. Thus, ToBin is called again on n / 2 = 1.

Now, n = 1, so n is not greater than 1. Thus, 1 % 2 = 1 is printed, and control jumps back to the previous frame.

Here, n = 3, and 3 % 2 = 1 is printed, with control jumping back a frame again.

Here, n = 7, and 7 % 2 = 1 is printed, and as the function is left and there are no more ToBin frames left, control is returned to the function that originally called ToBin.

In general, this function works as follows:

The binary expression of a number is equal to the binary expression of the floor of half that number, with the lowest bit of the original number appended.

Thus, the function repeatedly gets the binary expression of the floor of half the input until that value is a single bit. Then, that bit, being the most significant bit of the number, is printed, and subsequently, so is each bit in descending order of significance.

share|improve this answer
    
In this line Now, n = 1, so n is not greater than 1. Thus, 1 % 2 = 1 is printed, and control jumps back to the previous frame., What is it that makes it jumps back to the beginning of the function again. –  Lion King Aug 7 '13 at 5:32
    
It doesn't jump back to the beginning of the function. Execution simply continues in an earlier call of ToBin once the inner call is finished. That is, after the inner ToBin (Where n = 1) finishes, the next line run is the printf (where n = 3), as the inner ToBin can be seen as all running on the line where it is called when n = 3, which is itself running on the line where it is called when n = 7. –  qaphla Aug 7 '13 at 5:35
    
Sorry, but I want to know why we use in this condition if (n>1) why 1 specifically ? –  Lion King Aug 7 '13 at 7:31
    
If that condition does not hold, then (Assuming the original input is a positive integer -- note that this function does not work for negative numbers) either n = 0 or n = 1, and so it will suffice to print n, since both 0 and 1 can be represented in binary by the 1-bit string that is the same as their decimal representation. –  qaphla Aug 7 '13 at 7:33

This is a recursive function call. Then%2 basically just chops off the last bit (binary representation) of the integer. (2 because binary is base 2, so two possible base numbers). The n/2 removes the least significant bit (by integer division) and passes it to the next recursion level.

Therefore each recursion level prunes off the least significant bit of the integer which it is passed until at some level the integer is not 1. If it is 1, then the if fails and no more recursive call is made. Now the recursion rolls back. First the printf of the last recursive call is executed which will print the least significant bit of the integer which it was passed by the caller. Therefore at level k the k^th bit of the number is basically printed. Because at kth level the k-1 least significant bits were removed on the chain of recursive function calls, and the call at level k has the integer with k-1 least significant bits removed. Thus at every level the printf prints the LSB of the integer it was passed until the recursion rolls back to the top.

Here is a graphical representation. for n = 10. Then the binary of n is 1010. Try to draw such diagrams yourself with different values to get better understanding.

          ToBin (10 = 1010)          print 10%2 = 0
             |                           ^
             call ToBin (10/2)           |
             |                           |
             V                           |
          ToBin (5 = 101)            print 5%2 = 1
             |                           ^
             call ToBin (5/2)            |
             |                           |
             V                           |
          Tobin (2 = 10)             print 2%2 = 0
             |                           ^
             call ToBin (2/2)            |
             |                           |
             V                           |
          ToBin (1 = 1)              print 1%2 = 1
             |                           ^
             if condition fails,         |
             |  roll back.               |
             |                           |
             |                           |
             +------>------>------>------+
share|improve this answer
order    call    print
  1    ToBin(7)    1
          ↓        ↑
  2    ToBin(3)    1
          ↓        ↑
  3    ToBin(1) →  1

That's Recursion

Maybe you should find it's recursion equation.

share|improve this answer
    
short and precise :) –  instinct Jun 26 at 13:00

To find the base-2 representation of a number, we seek bits b0...bn such that

n = bn * 2^n + b_(n - 1) * 2^(n - 1) + ... + b1 * 2^1 + b0 * 2^0

Now we focus on finding b0, b1, ..., bn. Note that

(bn * 2^n + b_(n - 1) * 2^(n - 1) + ... + b1 * 2^1 + b0 * 2^0) % 2 = b0

because b0 * 2^0 % 2 = b0 and bj * 2^j % 2 = 0 when j >= 1 since 2^j % 2 = 0 if j >= 1. So,

       n = bn * 2^n + b_(n - 1) * 2^(n - 1) + ... + b1 * 2^1 + b0 * 2^0 
=> n % 2 = (bn * 2^n + b_(n - 1) * 2^(n - 1) + ... + b1 * 2^1 + b0 * 2^0) % 2 = b0

we've found that b0 = n % 2. This key fact number one.

Now, let's divide by 2:

n / 2 = (bn * 2^n + b_(n - 1) * 2^(n - 1) + ... + b1 * 2^1 + b0 * 2^0)
      = bn * 2^(n - 1) + b_(n - 1) * 2^(n - 2) + ... + b1 * 2^1

Now, let's stop right here. Let's take a close look at the binary representation for n / 2. Note that it is exactly equal to the binary representation of n just with the last bit chopped off. That is

    n = bn b_(n-1) ... b1 b0
n / 2 =   b_n b_(n-1) ... b1

This is key fact number two.

So, let's put together what we've learned.

  1. The binary representation of n is the binary representation of n / 2 with the last digit of the binary representation of n appended. This is from key fact number two.

  2. The last digit of the binary representation of n can be computed by calculating n % 2. This is from key fact number one.

All of this true except for one case: when n = 0. In that case, the binary representation of n is 0. If we tried to use the rule of dividing by 2, we'd never stop dividing by 2. So, we need a rule that catches when n = 0.

So, to compute the binary representation of n, first compute the binary representation of n / 2, then append the result of n % 2 but be sure to handle the case when n = 0. Let's write that in code:

// print binary representation of n
void ToBin(int n) {
    if(n > 1) { // this is to handle zero!
        ToBin(n / 2); // this will print the binary representation of n
    }
    print(n % 2); // this will print the the last digit
}
share|improve this answer

you enter 7 so

call 1) 7>1 true ,call ToBin(7/2)=ToBin(3.5) , pending print(7%2)=1
call 2) 3>1 true ,call ToBin(3/2)=ToBin(1.5) , pending print(3%2)=1
call 3) 1>1 false ,dont call ToBin(1/2), print(1%2)=1

,

print 1
pop function activation record for call 3)
pending print 1
pop function activation record for call 2)
pending print 1
pop function activation record for call 1)
So your output is 111
share|improve this answer

The recursion might be making it more difficult to understand than it otherwise might be. First, note that if we reorder the statements:

void ToBin(int n){
  printf( "%d", n%2 );
  if (n>1)
     ToBin( n/2 );
}

It will now print the digits in reverse order. This is, of course, not what you want, but now that the recursive call is at the end, it is easier to convert into iterative form:

void ToBin(int n) {
  do {
    printf( "%d", n%2 );
    n = n/2;
  } while(n > 1);
}

From this code, you can see it:

  • Prints the number modulo two.
  • Divides the number by two.
  • If the number is greater than 1, repeats.

Consider that given a base-10 number, we can divide by 10. The remainder and dividend are the least-significant digit and the number shifted over by one digit, respectively. This works for binary, too: rather than dividing by 10, however, we divide by two.

Essentially, then, the algorithm goes like this:

  • Print the least-significant digit.
  • Shift the number over one digit.
  • If the number's greater than one, repeat.

If you write this in a recursive form and then swap the recursion and printing, you print the number with digits in order from most-significant to least-significant. Voilà.

share|improve this answer
ToBin(7)
n=7 if(7>1)
    ToBin(7/2=3) call ToBin(3)
    {
     ToBin(3)
     n=3 if(3>1)
     ToBin(3/2=1) call ToBin(1)
     {
       ToBin(1)
       n=1 if(1>1)
         false
       print n%2=> 1%2= 1
      }     
    print n%2=> 3%2= 1
    }
print n%2=> 7%2= 1
share|improve this answer

Its recursion printing remainder (% operation) by division of 2 in following manner

ToBin() is calling itself till input argument n is greater than 1

 2 | 7
 ------     remainder   /|\
 2 | 3  ---> 1           |    down to top
 ------                  |
   | 1  ---> 1           |
     -------------------->
share|improve this answer

If n is 7, the recursive calls at each level are

 1.ToBin(7)--> 2. ToBin(3) --> 3. ToBin(1)

Now returning of values happens, and it is 1 in first case as 7%2 is 1,


1 in the second case as 3%2 is 1, 1 in the third case too as 1%2 is 1.

Hence 111 is the output

Note: Every recursive call has its own n, in its stack, so n is 7 in first call, 3 in second and 1 in third call.

share|improve this answer

The function ToBin uses recursion(function calling itself) and use this algorithm:

To convert from a base-10 integer numeral to its base-2 (binary) equivalent, the number is divided by two, and the remainder is the least-significant bit. The (integer) result is again divided by two, its remainder is the next least significant bit. This process repeats until the quotient becomes zero.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.