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I am learning C, so I am writting some little exercises in C to practice the language.

I have experience with functional code, so I love recursion. I think that it would be great to achieve tail recursion using C static variables, so additional arguments or helper functions would not be required.

This code to calculate a factorial using recursion, fails:

long long int fact(int n)
{
    static long long int result = -1;

    if(n <= 0) {
        if(result < 0)
            return 1;
        else {
            long long int temp = result;
            result = -1;
            return temp;
        }
    } else {
        result *= n;
        fact(n - 1);
    }
}

However, for some reason, I cannot do this in C. Is there an idiom to the same that? Is it just my compiler? What about memoization?

Thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
    
Give an example. Some recent versions of GCC are able to emit tail-recursive call, when optimizing, in limited cases. –  Basile Starynkevitch Aug 7 '13 at 5:51
    
@BasileStarynkevitch Example of funtion to calculate factorial, added. ;) –  Josell Aug 7 '13 at 5:56
1  
@JosuéMolina no, static makes it only do that once. –  xaxxon Aug 7 '13 at 6:01
1  
@xaxxon, interesting... I didn't know that. –  Josué Aug 7 '13 at 6:10
1  
@JosuéMolina I've learn a lot interesting tools and features studying C, too. –  Josell Aug 7 '13 at 6:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your code is broken since it has a control path where it doesn't return a value. This works fine:

long long int fact(int n)
{
    static long long int result = 1;

    if(n <= 1) {
        long long int temp = result;
        result = 1;
        return temp;
    } else {
        result *= n;
        return fact(n - 1);
    }
}

GCC does successfully transform the tail recursion to iteration.

In general, I think the reason to avoid using statics for tail recursion is simply because the function loses reentrancy. So much code ends up having to run in a multithreaded environment these days that it's hard to justify leaving function-local static "landmines" in code. I do admit this is as much opinion as technical argument. The non-static tail recursive code:

static inline long long int fact_(int n, long long int result)
{
    if(n <= 1) {
        return result;
    } else {
        return fact_(n - 1, result * n);
    }
}

long long int fact(int n)
{
    return fact_(n, 1);
}

is if anything a bit easier to write - notably both versions are exactly 13 LOC - and compiles just as efficiently to iteration but without needing static data.

share|improve this answer
    
Inlining a recursive function cannot work, can it? It would result in infinitely long code, unless I am understanding something incorrectly. Probably not an issue though, since I guess the compiler will understand it is not possible and just ignore the inline keyword... –  Alderath Aug 7 '13 at 7:07
    
+1 for 'So much code ends up having to run in a multithreaded environment these days that it's hard to justify leaving function-local static "landmines" in code.' strtok... –  Martin James Aug 7 '13 at 8:22
    
@Alderath Tail recursion is a special case: when the recursive call has exactly the form return f(args, ...); a compiler can transform the recursion into iteration by assigning the new values of the arguments to the current parameters and jumping back to the beginning of the function. –  Casey Aug 7 '13 at 12:54
    
Interesting solution. Thanks a lot! –  Josell Aug 7 '13 at 19:56

You don't seem to have an explicit return value from your else block. Are you not getting compiler warnings on that? Please make sure you're compiling with all warnings turned on.

Basically, you need to add return result; to the end of your else block otherwise how are you going to return the result back to the original caller? Remember, return only pops one function call, and you're an arbitrary depth when you call return because of all the recursive calls to fact() you've made in your else block.

share|improve this answer
    
Stills not working, just ones. It seems the memory stack doesn't like recursion. –  Josell Aug 7 '13 at 6:06
    
@Josell i didn't realize that "result" was a boolean as to wether you had a result . So yeah.. return fact(n-1) like what was already said. –  xaxxon Aug 7 '13 at 22:05
int factorial(int n)
{
    static int m = 1;
    m *= n;
    if (n > 1)
        factorial(n - 1);
    return m;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried your solution, which looks great, but the problem persists. As I said previously, it seems recursion doesn't work fine with stacks in memory and static variables. -- my compiler is gcc –  Josell Aug 7 '13 at 6:12
    
I tried out the solution given by Josué Molina. Its working fine. Please share your main function Josell. Are you receiving the value returned by the function factorial? –  Kranthi Kumar Aug 7 '13 at 6:49
1  
@KranthiKumar This function doesn't reset the value of m, so calls after the first get incorrect results. Here's an example. –  Casey Aug 7 '13 at 6:57
    
@Casey I agree with you. I just looked at only the first call. –  Kranthi Kumar Aug 7 '13 at 9:07

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