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I am trying to develop a reasonably simple purchase order tracking database. I am having trouble visualising what it the most efficient way of doing this.

At the moment I have 4 tables:

Purchase Order table:
PO Number, Customer Product Number, Quantity
6874     , ABC-0001                 4
6873     , XYX-2222                 1

Customer Product Table:
Customer Product Number, Finished Goods Number
ABC-0001               , 501-123
ABC-0001               , 501-124
ABC-0001               , 501-125


Finished Goods Table:
Finished Goods Number, Component Number, QTY Per FG
501-123              , COMP-0001       , 1
501-123              , COMP-0004       , 16
501-123              , COMP-0009       , 12
501-124              , COMP-0005       , 5
501-124              , COMP-0003       , 9
501-124              , COMP-0001       , 10
501-125              , COMP-0006       , 3
501-125              , COMP-0004       , 2
501-125              , COMP-0003       , 1

Component Table, Suppplier ID, (etc. etc. etc.)
COMP-0001
COMP-0002
COMP-0003
COMP-0004
COMP-0005
COMP-0006
COMP-0007
COMP-0008
COMP-0009
COMP-0010

I need to generate a list of all the individual components required to make a particular order. So the list would look something like this:

COMP-0001 - 44 (order quantity = 4 * (1 in 501-123 + 10 in 501-124)

etc. etc.

Can this be done in SQL only, or do I have to do it in steps using Cursors and generating intermediate tables between steps? It seems like a pretty simple thing to do, but I haven't been able to find a single example of how to do it.

The tables are reasonably large.

Order table is around 6000 orders (some of which are already complete, typically 300 or so currently open)
Customer Product Table around 2000 items
Finished Goods around 2000
The component table contains over 20,000 separate components

Am I going about this the right way to achieve the result?

Any help gratefully received.

share|improve this question
1  
20.000 rows is far away from being "reasonably" large. – a_horse_with_no_name Aug 7 '13 at 6:39
    
@duinui, SQL will be yawning at 20,000 rows. Not large at all – logixologist Aug 7 '13 at 6:45
4  
Btw: which DBMS do you use? Postgres? Oracle? That might influence the solution presented. – a_horse_with_no_name Aug 7 '13 at 6:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

A JOIN/GROUP BY seems to be what you need;

SELECT po.[PO Number], fg.[Component Number],
       SUM([Quantity]*[QTY Per FG]) Quantity
FROM PurchaseOrder po
JOIN CustomerProduct cp 
  ON po.[Customer Product Number]=cp.[Customer Product Number]
JOIN FinishedGoods fg 
  ON cp.[Finished Goods Number] = fg.[Finished Goods Number]
GROUP BY po.[PO Number], fg.[Component Number]

An SQLfiddle to test with for SQL Server, but besides the table name quoting, there should be nothing RDBMS specific.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you worked first time, and even an SQLfiddle set up. What a great little tool that is is ! – DuiNui Aug 7 '13 at 8:41

This query should give you the desired result:

SELECT C.COMPONENT , O.QUANTITY * (SUM(FG.QTY))
FROM ORDER O JOIN PRODUCT P ON O.CUSTOMER = P.CUSTOMER
JOIN FINISHED_GOODS FG ON P.FINISHED_GOODS = FG.FINISHED_GOODS
JOIN COMPONENT C ON FG.COMPONENT = C.COMPONENT
WHERE P.PO_NUMBER = ?
share|improve this answer
select
    po.[PO Number], fg.[Component Number],
    sum(po.[Quantity] * fg.[QTY Per FG]) as Quantity
from PurchaseOrder as po
    inner join CustomerProduct as cp on cp.[Customer Product Number] = po.[Customer Product Number]
    inner join FinishedGoods as fg on fg.[Finished Goods Number] = cp.[Finished Goods Number]
group by po.[PO Number], fg.[Component Number]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, worked perfectly. – DuiNui Aug 7 '13 at 8:39

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