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I use extra brackets in my code. I thought when the destructor should be called after the local variable scope is ended but it doesn't work like this:

class TestClass {
public:
    TestClass() {
        printf( "TestClass()\n" );
    }
    ~TestClass() {
        printf( "~TestClass()\n" );
    }
};

int main() {
    int a, b, c;
    {
         TestClass *test = new TestClass();
    }
}

It outputs:

TestClass()

So it doesn't call the destructor of the TestClass but why? If I call it manually (delete test) it calls the destructor, right. But why it doesn't call the destructor in the first case?

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1  
Because if you create an object with new, it can only be destructed when calling delete on it - it won't be destroyed by going out of scope. –  Nbr44 Aug 7 '13 at 7:44
2  
@Nbr44: Not exactly true. You can call the destructor directly. Of course, this won't free the memory, but it will destroy the object. Then the only way to properly free the memory without undefined behavior is by constructing another object of the same type in its place (via placement new) and calling delete on that. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 7 '13 at 8:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
TestClass *test = new TestClass();

You using new which creates a dynamically allocated object (most likely placed on the heap). This type of resource needs to be manually managed by you. By managing, you should use delete on it after you have done using it.

{
     TestClass *test = new TestClass();
     // do something
     delete test;
}

But for the most of your purposes and intents, you just have to use automatic-storage objects, which frees you the hassle of having to manually manage the object. It would also most likely to have better performance especially in short-lived objects. You should always prefer to use them unless you have a really good reason not to do so.

{
     TestClass test;
     // do something
}

However, if you need the semantics of dynamically allocated objects or that of pointers, it will always be better to use some mechanism to encapsulate the deletion/freeing of the object/resource for you, which also provides you additional safety especially when you are using exceptions and conditional branches. In your case, it would be better if you use std::unique_ptr.

{
     std::unique_ptr<TestClass> test(new TestClass());  // auto test = std::make_unique<TestClass>();  in C++14
     // do something (maybe you want to pass ownership of the pointer)
}


The following is a relevant link to help you decide whether to use automatic storage objects or dynamically allocated objects: Why should `new` be used as little as possible?

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1  
"You should always prefer to use this unless you have a really good reason not to do so." -- but why it's so important not to use pointers here? Because you may forget to delete it or some other important reasons? –  JavaRunner Aug 7 '13 at 7:58
1  
@JavaRunner Yes. And they are most prone to errors, give you the unnecessary indirection which is likely to hamper performance, and it's ugly to have code with a lot of *s and deletes on it. –  Mark Garcia Aug 7 '13 at 8:00
2  
@JavaRunner another issue, besides the clouded lifetime, is clouded ownership: it can become difficult to track who owns a pointer to a dynamically allocated object, that is, who is in charge of deleting it. Value semantics are easier to reason than reference semantics. –  juanchopanza Aug 7 '13 at 8:04
    
@JavaRunner I recommend you to learn RAII, which is a really good tool in programming in C++. Also read this SO question: stackoverflow.com/questions/395123/raii-and-smart-pointers-in-c –  Mark Garcia Aug 7 '13 at 8:14
    
You chose a bad example using unique_ptr, because it results in exactly the same semantics as using a local variable. It might be appropriate if, for example, you were using polymorphism (and the actual type wasn't known until runtime), but the most frequent reason for allocating dynamically is precisely because the required lifetime doesn't correspond to any given scope, and that the object must be destructed explicitly, at a moment which depends on program logic, and not on lexical considerations like scope. –  James Kanze Aug 7 '13 at 8:14

Because you have a pointer to a dynamically allocated object. Only the pointer goes out of scope, not the object it points to. You have to call delete on the pointer in order for the pointee's destructor to get called.

Try with an automatic storage object instead:

{
  TestClass test;
}

Here, the destructor will be called on exiting the scope.

The use of raw pointers to dynamically allocated objects in C++ is discouraged because it can easily lead to resource leaks like the one shown in your code example. If pointers to dynamically allocated objects are really needed, it is wise to handle them with a smart pointer, rather than to attempt to manually deal with their destruction.

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This answer is good enough but just to add some more.

I see you have been coded with Java. In C++ to create variable/object in stack keyword new is not needed. Actually when you use keyword new your object is creating in heap and it doesn't destroys after leaving scope. To destroy it you need to call delete in your case delete test;

In such a structure as yours, after leaving scope you just lose pointer what points into object, so after leaving scope you cannot free memory and call destructor, but eventually OS call destructor just after exit() instruction is executed.

To sum up C++ != Java

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