Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing unit test cases for my code where I have a method that takes 7 different parameters. The sample method is like below:

public boolean registerUser(String firstName, String lastName, String dob, String email, String phone, String gender, String country) throws MyException {

  if(firstName  == null){
   throw MyException();
  }
  if(lastName  == null){
   throw MyException();
  }
  // SO ON.....
 // EACH PARAMETER WILL BE NULL CHECKED SEPARATELY AS WE NEED TO KNOW WHICH PARAMETER WAS PASSED NULL. 
 // IN CASE OF ANY NULL PARAMETER, A CUSTOM EXCEPTION IS THROWN AS ABOVE.
 // IMPLEMENTATION CODE HERE TO CALL SOME WEB SERVICE AND REGISTER USER.

}

Now my query is I am writing test cases for this particular method. And I have around 10 other methods in the same class for different user actions.

So in this case if I need to check for null parameters in SINGLE JUNIT TEST CASE so that my junits count doesnt go high just because of many parameters.

Is there any way to write on junit for all parameters null checks ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
What's wrong with having separate tests? Looks like the cleanest approach to me. – TrueDub Aug 7 '13 at 8:07
    
There is nothing wrong. But if I write separate test case for each parameter null check, I will have 7 test cases for this one method which will only be for null checks. And there will other test cases as well for negative/positive responses. Isnt this count too high just for one method test cases? – Gaurav Sachdeva Aug 7 '13 at 8:10
    
Of course, you can write a single test-case which checks the null-checks in the methods (with try-catch-blocks). But as stated by TrueDub, the cleanest approach is to have separate tests. It is no problem to have a high count of test cases – MrD Aug 7 '13 at 8:25
    
More tests gives more coverage, and makes it easier later to extend your tests - for example, if one of the IF statements needs to do extra work, it's then easier to determine that within the separate test. – TrueDub Aug 7 '13 at 8:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.