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I have a class which is similar to following. I am using pairing heap of boost library which needs comparator as template argument. My comparator should access the data and member of class A to make comparisions. Initially, I declared 'my_compare' as struct and overloaded the () operator. But the struct could not access data of class A unless the pointer('this') to class A was passed to it. But that would mean my_compare no longer remains a compile time constant, and it would produce error: 'this' cannot appear in constant expression.

As a second attempt I declared my_compare as a member function (so that it can access the members and data). I get following error now:

error: type/value mismatch at argument 1 in template parameter list for 
‘template<class T> struct boost::heap::compare’

I suspect two possible explanations: 'my_compare' is not an (function)object and it is not a binary function as 'this' is implicitely passed. How can I solve this issue.

class A{
public:
  //some data(properties)
  struct c{
    //some data  
  };
  double method1(int variable);
  double method2(const struct c&);

  bool my_compare(struct c& c, struct c& d){
     //accesses member methods and data    
  }

  typedef boost::heap::pairing_heap<struct c, boost::heap::compare<my_compare> > myheap;

}
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Make my_compare a static member. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 7 '13 at 8:50
    
Can't do that. It has to access non static member and functions –  Utkrist Adhikari Aug 7 '13 at 8:50
    
A comparator function should only compare the arguments and return a boolean if they are "equal" or not, it should not need to use anything else. If it does, then you have to make those members of the structure you compare (i.e. make a member in c like A* a;). –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 7 '13 at 8:53
    
Uhm, don't think you can do that. Any chance you can stick A's this into a A* my_owner inside c? –  Mats Petersson Aug 7 '13 at 8:54
1  
@JoachimPileborg: Same idea, eh? –  Mats Petersson Aug 7 '13 at 8:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to store an A* inside c. Perhaps like this:

class A{
public:
  //some data(properties)
  struct c{
    //some data  
    A* owner_A;
    c(A* a) : owner_A(a) {}
  };
  double method1(int variable);
  double method2(const struct c&);

  static bool my_compare(struct c& c, struct c& d){
     //accesses member methods and data  
     c->owner_A->method1(42);  
     d->owner_A->method2(d); 
  }

  typedef boost::heap::pairing_heap<struct c, boost::heap::compare<my_compare> > myheap;

}
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Works like a charm. I did not make it static though. Thanks a lot. –  Utkrist Adhikari Aug 7 '13 at 10:22

First things first: The my_compare function either has to be a free-standing function, or made static. There's really no way around it in your situation.

However, if you really need to access members in the A class, then you can make pointer in the c structure to an A instance:

struct c
{
    A* a;
    // Other members
};

Then when you create a c object you set the a pointer to this.

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Than you should use a functor.

class A {
    struct my_compare;
    friend struct my_compare;
    struct my_compare {
        A &self;
        A(A &self) : self(self) {}
        bool operator()(struct c& c, struct c& d) {
            // access member data and methods on self
        }
    };
}

Of course you have to tell it which A instance to use, so you'll have to construct it like my_compare(*this) when constructing the heap.

Note, that you have to make the inner class a friend, it is not automatic. You can either declare it, make it a friend and define it, or you can define it, make it a friend, but than you have to put the operator body outside of the class.

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