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I am trying to adapt singleton policy for my CsvConfiguration Property.

If the configuration is already available, just return the configuration. else, get the configuration and return the same and I am able to build this code.

    public Rootpdf pdfConfiguration
    {
        get
        {
            Rootpdf pdfConfiguration = null;
            try
            {
                if (pdfConfiguration == null)
                {
                    //retrieve the configuration file.
                    //load the configuration and return it!
                }
                else
                {
                    return pdfConfiguration;
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Log.Error("An error occurred while reading the configuration file.", e);
            }

            return pdfConfiguration;
        }
    }

Advantages (i hope): Whenever my pdfConfiguration is wanted, if already it is available, i can return it. Need not load the configuration file eachtime and calculate the configuration.

My Query: The resharper! The resharper tells that the code

   if (pdfConfiguration == null) //The expression is always true.

Is it really a problem with resharper that it doesn't understand I am following this singleton pattern ?

or

Am I not following singleton pattern at all?

share|improve this question
2  
The pdfConfiguration is only a local variable assigned to null, not a persistent member. It would be also way easier to just use Lazy<T>... –  Patryk Ćwiek Aug 7 '13 at 8:58
3  
This is not the singleton pattern... –  Killercam Aug 7 '13 at 8:58
2  
This is the FailAtLazyLoad:EraseAllInformationAndThenLoadItAllAgainBecauseYouJustCanPattern™ –  It'sNotALie. Aug 7 '13 at 9:00
    
this is not singleton which is not a pattern: it's an anti-pattern. –  Pierre Aug 7 '13 at 9:00
    
@Killercam: sorry, If my understanding is wrong. According to me, singleton pattern returns something if not already available. Where am I wrong ? –  now he who must not be named. Aug 7 '13 at 9:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

think you have to use a local variable out of the getter

    private static Rootpdf  _pdfConfiguration ;
    public static Rootpdf pdfConfiguration
    {
        get
        {
            try
            {
                if (_pdfConfiguration == null)
                {
                    //retrieve the configuration file.
                    //load the configuration and return it!
                }
                else
                {
                    return _pdfConfiguration;
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Log.Error("An error occurred while reading the configuration file.", e);
            }

            return _pdfConfiguration;
        }
    }

and as you want a singleton, i made it a static property... hope it's what you need.

share|improve this answer
    
"as you want a singleton, i made it a static property... hope it's what you need." +1 –  now he who must not be named. Aug 7 '13 at 9:15

You're setting the singleton to null at the top of your get clause:

Rootpdf pdfConfiguration = null;
//THIS IS THE PROBLEM.

Note: 99% of the time, ReSharper is smarter than you. I don't like it, but it's true.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is if I don't do that I get an error stating "variable might not be initialized" –  now he who must not be named. Aug 7 '13 at 9:01
    
@nowhewhomustnotbenamed. It should run fine, I think. –  It'sNotALie. Aug 7 '13 at 9:14
    
Yes, as soon as It was moved outside the property. –  now he who must not be named. Aug 7 '13 at 9:14
class MySingletonClass 
{
    private static UserSettings instance = null;

    /// <summary>
    /// Default protected constructor.
    /// </summary>
    protected MySingletonClass()
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Invoke the singleton instance.
    /// </summary>
    public static MySingletonClass Instance()
    {
        if (instance == null)
            instance = new MySingletonClass();
        return instance;
    }
}

This woud be invoked/instanciated like

MySingletonClass msc = MySingletonClass.Instance();

You can also use an accessor/Property to return the instance

public MySingletonInstance Instance
{
    get 
    {
        if (instance == null)
            instance = new MySingletonInstance();
        return instance;
    }
}

Where this is invoked/instantiated via

MySingletonClass msc = MySingletonClass.Instance;

I like the first method of the above.

I hope this helps.

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1  
thanks for the singleton pattern! –  now he who must not be named. Aug 7 '13 at 9:12

Here is what your class should look like:

public class RootPdf
{
    private static RootPdf instance;

    private RootPdf()
    {
        //retrieve the configuration file.
        //load the configuration and return it! 
    }

    public static RootPdf Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (instance == null)
            {
                try
                {
                    instance = new RootPdf();
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    Log.Error("An error occurred while reading the configuration file.", e);
                    return null;
                }
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }
}

And here is how you will call the object:

var pdf = RootPdf.Instance;
share|improve this answer

As already mentioned this is a not a singleton pattern.

If you want to stick with the idea you described then I would change your code to :

internal class Config
    {
        private readonly Lazy<Rootpdf> _config;
        public Config()
        {
            _config = new Lazy<Rootpdf>(ReadConfiguration);
        }

        private Rootpdf ReadConfiguration()
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }


        public Rootpdf pdfConfiguration
        {
            get
            {                
                try
                {
                    return _config.Value;
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    Log.Error("An error occurred while reading the configuration file.", e);
                }

                return null;
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Lazy loading.. thanks for demonstrating –  now he who must not be named. Aug 7 '13 at 9:14

This line: if (pdfConfiguration == null) will always be true due to this line (just before) Rootpdf pdfConfiguration = null;. What you need to do is to place the last line (Rootpdf pdfConfiguration = null;) outside the Get method. This will stop the variable to be initialized to null each time.

private static Rootpdf pdfConfiguration = null;
public Rootpdf PdfConfiguration
{

    get
    {            
        try
        {
            if (pdfConfiguration == null)
    ....

More information on the Singleton Pattern is available here.

Alternatively, you can use a Static Constructor:

A static constructor is used to initialize any static data, or to perform a particular action that needs to be performed once only. It is called automatically before the first instance is created or any static members are referenced.

public class Foo {
private static Rootpdf pdfConfiguration = null;
static Foo()
{
    pdfConfiguration = ....
}
public Rootpdf pdfConfiguration
{
    get
    {
        return pdfConfiguration;
    }
 ....
share|improve this answer
    
great explanation..Thanks –  now he who must not be named. Aug 7 '13 at 9:13
    
@nowhewhomustnotbenamed.: As per your edit suggestion, I have updated my answer. –  npinti Aug 7 '13 at 9:15
    
+1 for the static constructor too.. Am i just accepting the other answer because of his low reputation.. Thanks for the great answer.. :) –  now he who must not be named. Aug 7 '13 at 9:16
    
@nowhewhomustnotbenamed.: No worries :). –  npinti Aug 7 '13 at 9:19

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