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I am trying to print numbers from 1 to 100 without using loops, using C#. Any clues?

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4  
If this is for an assignment, what constructs have you been taught so far? This will help formulate answers. –  JMD Nov 27 '09 at 18:11
5  
Have you got to recursion yet in the class or is this the first homework assignment? –  The Matt Nov 27 '09 at 18:14
4  
Whew. This question was viewed 99 times when I found it. Glad I missed the corner case. –  John Nov 27 '09 at 18:23
11  
Why has this been closed? This is a total valid & real question. –  Sebastian P.R. Gingter Nov 27 '09 at 18:36
12  
stackoverflow.com/questions/2044033/… Are you two in the same class? If so, why do one want it in C# while the other in Java –  Christy John Jan 12 '10 at 4:52
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25 Answers

up vote 51 down vote accepted

Recursion maybe?

public static void PrintNext(i) {
    if (i <= 100) {
        Console.Write(i + " ");
        PrintNext(i + 1);
    }
}

public static void Main() {
    PrintNext(1);
}
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28  
Gratuitous "but first you have to understand recursion" comment. –  Greg Beech Nov 27 '09 at 18:19
4  
Isnt this a loop? –  Leroy Jenkins Nov 27 '09 at 21:50
7  
Recursion generally isn't considered a loop, even though its behaving similar to a loop. –  Kyle Trauberman Nov 27 '09 at 22:15
3  
A loop generally implies a mutable counter, this one doesn't have that (every invocation has its own "counter"). –  Pavel Minaev Nov 27 '09 at 22:56
18  
The easiest way to learn recursion is to learn recursion. –  Chris Jan 28 '10 at 15:15
show 6 more comments

No loops, no conditionals, and no hardcoded literal output, aka "divide and conquer FTW" solution:

class P
{
    static int n;

    static void P1() { System.Console.WriteLine(++n); }

    static void P2() { P1(); P1(); }

    static void P4() { P2(); P2(); }

    static void P8() { P4(); P4(); }

    static void P16() { P8(); P8(); }

    static void P32() { P16(); P16(); }

    static void P64() { P32(); P32(); }

    static void Main() { P64(); P32(); P4(); }
}

Alternative approach:

using System;

class C
{
    static int n;

    static void P() { Console.WriteLine(++n); }

    static void X2(Action a) { a(); a(); }

    static void X5(Action a) { X2(a); X2(a); a(); }

    static void Main() { X2(() => X5(() => X2(() => X5(P)))); }
}
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33  
Clever. Evil, but clever. –  Jonathan Allen Nov 28 '09 at 19:43
12  
This is truly brilliant! –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 30 '09 at 14:34
3  
This is innovative, but I see it as valuable as writing down 100 WriteLine statements :) –  Gregory Pakosz Jan 11 '10 at 19:04
9  
This is the job security answer - brilliant –  Mike Robinson Jan 12 '10 at 4:44
3  
@Ozan: 1 to 101 is { P64(); P32(); P4(); P1(); }, 1 to 7 is { P4(); P2(); P1(); }. –  Rasmus Faber Jan 12 '10 at 11:03
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Console.Out.WriteLine('1,2,3,4, ... ,100');
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2  
I vote for this one :D –  Sudhir Jonathan Nov 27 '09 at 18:50
1  
definitely the right answer –  Stefano Borini Dec 7 '09 at 10:58
63  
I'm sorry, this only prints 5 numbers, not all 100. –  Adam Woś Jan 11 '10 at 18:52
7  
I hope that Adam was joking in his comment. Of course it only prints 5 numbers. It's just shorthand. –  Allain Lalonde Jan 12 '10 at 19:50
add comment

One more:

Console.WriteLine(
   String.Join(
      ", ", 
      Array.ConvertAll<int, string>(
         Enumerable.Range(1, 100).ToArray(), 
         i => i.ToString()
      )
   )
);
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1  
String.Join is a nice solution, indeed! How didn't it come to my mind immediately? –  fviktor Nov 27 '09 at 18:49
3  
Brilliant answer. –  Allain Lalonde Jan 12 '10 at 19:51
7  
String.Join, Array.ConvertAll, Enumerable.Range and ToArray all use for/foreach constructs. You can't just encapsulate them and claim there is no looping! –  Callum Rogers Jan 15 '10 at 23:21
    
@Callum, there are no loop constructs in my C# code as requested. :) This answer is all about plausible deniability and how to make the printed output look prettier using String.Join. –  João Angelo Jan 18 '10 at 12:17
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using IronRuby;

class Print1To100WithoutLoopsDemo
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Ruby
            .CreateEngine()
            .Execute("(1..100).each {|i| System::Console.write_line i }");
    }
}

Hey, why not?

share|improve this answer
    
Great approach! –  Todd Richardson Nov 28 '09 at 19:40
9  
The answer to all C# questions. –  Fraser Jan 12 '10 at 0:05
1  
Ruby's .each would be a loop, or? –  gerrit May 14 '12 at 12:37
    
@gerrit: The Ruby Language Specification doesn't say how to implement Range#each. It is perfectly possible to implement it with recursion, for example. Besides, if you really want to dig down into the implementation, then even using a for loop counts as "without loop", since it will eventually be compiled into GOTOs anyway. –  Jörg W Mittag May 14 '12 at 12:42
    
Hm, that makes the original question poorly defined then, or not? –  gerrit May 14 '12 at 15:00
show 1 more comment
Console.WriteLine('1');
Console.WriteLine('2');
...
Console.WriteLine('100');

...Or would you have accepted a recursive solution?

EDIT: or you could do this and use a variable:

int x = 1;
Console.WriteLine(x);
x+=1;
Console.WriteLine('2');
x+=1;
...
x+=1
Console.WriteLine('100');
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the recursive idea. Even though it's a bit abusive of the stack, it would work and it's only an assignment, presumably. –  JMD Nov 27 '09 at 18:14
    
I haven't done C# in awhile, but couldn't you just just do Console.WriteLine( ++x ); instead of doing x += 1 before each line? (Obviously initializing the variable beforehand. –  William Nov 27 '09 at 18:16
23  
You could even use the variable the other 99 times! ;-) –  Jim Ferrans Nov 27 '09 at 18:17
    
@Jim: yes, I'm a bit TOO quick with the copy/paste. I also had an idea to use events: Increase x, raise an event whose listener prints the event arg (which contains x). I see the recursive solution was the selected answer. I had hoped someone would submit a lambda solution. ;) –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 27 '09 at 18:38
add comment
Enumerable.Range(1, 100)
    .Select(i => i.ToString())
    .ToList()
    .ForEach(s => Console.WriteLine(s));

Not sure if this counts as the loop is kind of hidden, but if it's legit it's an idiomatic solution to the problem. Otherwise you can do this.

    int count = 1;
top:
    if (count > 100) { goto bottom; }
    Console.WriteLine(count++);
    goto top;
bottom:

Of course, this is effectively what a loop will be translated to anyway but it's certainly frowned upon these days to write code like this.

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2  
Both samples contain a loop. –  Henk Holterman Nov 27 '09 at 18:51
4  
+1 for the goto! :) –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 27 '09 at 19:07
add comment
Enumerable.Range(1, 100).ToList().ForEach(i => Console.WriteLine(i));

Here's a breakdown of what is happening in the above code:

Performance Consideration

The ToList call will cause memory to be allocated for all items (in the above example 100 ints). This means O(N) space complexity. If this is a concern in your app i.e. if the range of integers can be very high, then you should avoid ToList and enumerate the items directly.

Unfortunately ForEach is not part of the IEnumerable extensions provided out of the box (hence the need to convert to List in the above example). Fortunately this is fairly easy to create:

static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static void ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Action<T> func)
    {
        foreach (T item in items)
        {
            func(item);
        }
    }
}

With the above IEnumerable extension in place, now in all the places where you need to apply an action to an IEnumerable you can simply call ForEach with a lambda. So now the original example looks like this:

Enumerable.Range(1, 100).ForEach(i => Console.WriteLine(i));

The only difference is that we no longer call ToList, and this results in constant (O(1)) space usage... which would be a quite noticeable gain if you were processing a really large number of items.

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3  
Yea, but there's a loop in there! –  user195488 Jan 12 '10 at 1:01
    
You can even pass a method group: Enumerable.Range(1, 100).ForEach(Console.WriteLine); –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 31 '10 at 21:15
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No loops, no recursion, just a hashtable-like array of functions to choose how to branch:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace Juliet
{
    class PrintStateMachine
    {
        int state;
        int max;
        Action<Action>[] actions;

        public PrintStateMachine(int max)
        {
            this.state = 0;
            this.max = max;
            this.actions = new Action<Action>[] { IncrPrint, Stop };
        }

        void IncrPrint(Action next)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(++state);
            next();
        }

        void Stop(Action next) { }

        public void Start()
        {
            Action<Action> action = actions[Math.Sign(state - max) + 1];
            action(Start);
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            PrintStateMachine printer = new PrintStateMachine(100);
            printer.Start();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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Just for the ugly literal interpretation:

Console.WriteLine("numbers from 1 to 100 without using loops, ");

(you can laugh now or later, or not)

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With regular expressions

using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

public class Hello1
{
   public static void Main()
   {

      // Count to 128 in unary
      string numbers = "x\n";
      numbers += Regex.Replace(numbers, "x+\n", "x$&");
      numbers += Regex.Replace(numbers, "x+\n", "xx$&");
      numbers += Regex.Replace(numbers, "x+\n", "xxxx$&");
      numbers += Regex.Replace(numbers, "x+\n", "xxxxxxxx$&");
      numbers += Regex.Replace(numbers, "x+\n", "xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx$&");
      numbers += Regex.Replace(numbers, "x+\n", "xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx$&");
      numbers += Regex.Replace(numbers, "x+\n", "xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx$&");

      // Out of 1..128, select 1..100
      numbers = Regex.Match(numbers, "(.*\n){100}").Value;

      // Convert from unary to decimal
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{10}", "<10>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{9}", "<9>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{8}", "<8>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{7}", "<7>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{6}", "<6>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{5}", "<5>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{4}", "<4>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{3}", "<3>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{2}", "<2>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "x{1}", "<1>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<10>){10}", "<100>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<10>){9}", "<90>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<10>){8}", "<80>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<10>){7}", "<70>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<10>){6}", "<60>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<10>){5}", "<50>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<10>){4}", "<40>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<10>){3}", "<30>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<10>){2}", "<20>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<[0-9]{3}>)$", "$1<00>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "(<[0-9]{2}>)$", "$1<0>");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "<([0-9]0)>\n", "$1\n");
      numbers = Regex.Replace(numbers, "<([0-9])0*>", "$1");

      System.Console.WriteLine(numbers);

   }
}

The output:

# => 1
# => 2
# ...
# => 99
# => 100
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4  
Oh... my... god.... –  Callum Rogers Jan 15 '10 at 23:22
5  
By which I guess you mean: "I'd give you as many +1's as the system would allow, but I'm sort of busy hammering a pencil into my brain with Knuth vol. 1. Thanks a lot." –  Wayne Conrad Jan 15 '10 at 23:53
    
Who's the sick puppy who voted this up? Fess up! –  Wayne Conrad Jan 21 '10 at 7:15
    
question states "using c#" –  Luke Jun 12 '11 at 19:28
    
@Luke, I guess it is important that insanity follow the rules. Better now? –  Wayne Conrad Jun 13 '11 at 22:43
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I can think of two ways. One of them involves about 100 lines of code!

There's another way to reuse a bit of code several times without using a while/for loop...

Hint: Make a function that prints the numbers from 1 to N. It should be easy to make it work for N = 1. Then think about how to make it work for N = 2.

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By the time I answer this, someone will already have it, so here it is anyway, with credit to Caleb:

void Main()
{
    print(0, 100);
}

public void print(int x, int limit)
{
    Console.WriteLine(++x);
    if(x != limit)
        print(x, limit);
}
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Method A:

Console.WriteLine('1');
Console.WriteLine('print 2');
Console.WriteLine('print 3');
...
Console.WriteLine('print 100');

Method B:

func x (int j)
{
  Console.WriteLine(j);
  if (j < 100)
     x (j+1);
}

x(1);
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1  
I really don't want to downvote on such a silly question, but he did say using c#. :) –  Donnie Nov 27 '09 at 18:12
2  
@Donnie, this seems to be a homework question, which means users are encouraged to not give the exact code, but rather enough of a push in the right direction for the OP to figure it out, which I think @wallyk has done quite well. +1 –  Brandon Nov 27 '09 at 18:14
    
@Brandon, fair enough. And I didn't downvote either, was just saying :) –  Donnie Nov 27 '09 at 18:15
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Just LINQ it...

Console.WriteLine(Enumerable.Range(1, 100)
                            .Select(s => s.ToString())
                            .Aggregate((x, y) => x + "," + y));
share|improve this answer
    
wouldn't this be in turn translated into a while loop anyway? –  Luke Jun 12 '11 at 19:29
    
aggregate is recursive –  Matthew Whited Jun 12 '11 at 21:55
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A completely unnecessary method:

int i = 1;
System.Timers.Timer t = new System.Timers.Timer(1);
t.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(
  (sender, e) => { if (i > 100) t.Enabled = false; else Console.WriteLine(i++); });
t.Enabled = true;
Thread.Sleep(110);
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I can think two ways:

  • using 100 Console.WriteLine
  • using goto in a switch statement
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class Program { static int temp = 0; public static int a() { temp = temp + 1;

        if (temp == 100)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(temp);
            return 0;
        }

        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine(temp);
        }
        Program.a();

        return 0;
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
        Program.a();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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PrintNum(1);
private void PrintNum(int i)
{
   Console.WriteLine("{0}", i);
   if(i < 100)
   {
      PrintNum(i+1);
   } 
}
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namespace ConsoleApplication2 {
    class Program {
        static void Main(string[] args) {
            Print(Enumerable.Range(1, 100).ToList(), 0);
            Console.ReadKey();

        }
        public static void Print(List<int> numbers, int currentPosition) {
            Console.WriteLine(numbers[currentPosition]);
            if (currentPosition < numbers.Count - 1) {
                Print(numbers, currentPosition + 1);
            }
        }
    }
}
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This is more or less pseudo code I havent done c# in years, PS running on 1 hour of sleep so i might be wrong.

int i = 0;

public void printNum(j){       
    if(j > 100){
        break;
    } else {
        print(j);
        printNum(j + 1);
    }
}
public void main(){
    print(i);
    printNum(i + 1);       
}
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2  
You want return; instead of break; in your edge case. And print() isn't the correct function -- presumably you want Console.WriteLine(). –  Daniel Pryden Nov 27 '09 at 18:59
add comment
public void Main()
{
  printNumber(1);
}

private void printNumber(int x)
{
  Console.WriteLine(x.ToString());
  if(x<101)
  {
    x+=1;
    printNumber(x);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
LOl posted a similar answer 8 seconds after you :( –  Faisal Abid Nov 27 '09 at 18:16
2  
shouldn't x be incremented? :D Stackoverflow! –  Jack Nov 27 '09 at 18:25
    
doh! fixed now :-) –  brendan Nov 27 '09 at 19:59
add comment

My solution is in thread 2045637, which asks the same question for Java.

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The cool and funny way:

static void F(int[] array, int n)
{
    Console.WriteLine(array[n] = n);
    F(array, n + 1);
}
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    try { F(new int[101], 1); }
    catch (Exception e) { }
}
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class Program
{
    static Timer s = new Timer();
    static int i = 0;
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        s.Elapsed += Restart;
        s.Start();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
    static void Restart(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        s.Dispose();
        if (i < 100)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(++i);
            s = new Timer(1);
            s.Elapsed += Restart;
            s.Start();
        }
    }
}

You must notice that I'm NOT using recursion.

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