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I am unable to find a solution to my problem other than modifying all the derived classes.

I have a Base class and some 1000 Derived classes inheriting from Base. Now, there is another class say Container which contains a vector of Base class pointers std::vector<Base *> derivList.

The above list is populated with the addresses of all the derived classes objects after creation.

All the files are in different translational units.

What I want to do:

1) To be able to call a single function of Base class from Container class using the elements of vector in the Container which are pointing to different derived classes.

2) But when I call this function, inside that function I should go be able to access the public members of different Derived class to which the Base class pointer is pointing to.

class Base
{
  public: 
    vitrual void someMethod();
    void containerCallsThisMethod();
};
void Base::containerCallsThisMethod()
{
  // I need to access the public functions of derived classes here
  // say: Derived1::calc(), Derived2::calc,.( I don't havederived class names here in  Base)
}

class Derived1:public Base
{
   public:
      void calc();
};

class Container
{
    std::vector<Base *> derivList;
    void execute();
};

void Container::execute()
{
    for(i = 0; i < derivList.size();i++)
    {
      derivList[i]->containerCallsThisMethod();
    }
}

My constraints are:

  • I should not Touch the Derived class as it is very laborious, but still I can change the Base class.
  • Base can't have a list( not even forward declarations) of Derived classes.

I thought I could do it through the this pointer as it has the ClassName type for non-const functions and it points to the derived class objects. But I am unbale to call the Derived class methods using this.

Is there any way to do this wthiout much labor, any specific design pattern or a hack?

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Read about the Curiously recurring template pattern. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 7 '13 at 11:08
    
Can you be more specific about what you want to do in Base::containerCallsThisMethod? How to you want to distinguish between the different possible derived classes? –  Björn Pollex Aug 7 '13 at 11:12
    
I have huge number of derived classes, I can't do this for every derived class. –  Uchia Itachi Aug 7 '13 at 11:13
    
@Bjorn Pollex: That is my problem, neither do I have a list nor the hearder files which contain the derived class declarations. Is there any way to do it using this because that should point to derived class. –  Uchia Itachi Aug 7 '13 at 11:15
    
Why can't you call the virtual function you need in the base function? –  Neil Kirk Aug 7 '13 at 11:29
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3 Answers 3

if you have a base class with derived classes, the these derived classes override the function, lets call it func(), then that override of func() will be called. as far as i could find, the only solution to what you want is relaying on the good behavior of the derived classes or put func() as a static function, put it into friend class, or put it into a static inner class.

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If I understand you correctly, you can just declare calc as a (possibly protected) virtual function in Base. This only works if calc has exactly the same signature in all derived classes. In that case, no code must be changed in the derived classes. Now, when you call this->calc in Base it will be dispatched to the implementation in Derived.

class Base
{
  public: 
    vitrual void someMethod();
    void containerCallsThisMethod();

    virtual ~Base(); // Important !!
  protected:
    virtual void calc() = 0;
};
void Base::containerCallsThisMethod()
{
  calc(); // will call derived class implementation
}

Remember to add a virtual destructor to Base when you do this.

This works because when a method is declared virtual, it will be virtual in all derived classes as well, even if not explicitly specified so.

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If the

public members of different Derived class

you need to access are methods with the same signature, but implemented differently in each Derived class (which is what your example seems to indicate) you are just finding yourself in the most basic use case of virtual method binding.

And you would then be very lucky : you only need to add the virtual keyword before the method signature in Base class definition.

class Base
{
    void containerCallsThisMethod()
    {
         calcDerivedMethod();
    }

    virtual void calcDerivedMethod();
}

class DerivedA : public Base
{
    void calcDerivedMethod()
    {
       //Specific implementation for DerivedA class.
    }
}

What happens here is exactly what you described as a requirement : Container method execute() call in turn containerCallsThisMethod() on every object it points to. This call ends up always being Base::containerCallsThisMethod(). But inside this last method, the call to calcDerivedMethod() is dispatched to the dynamic type of the pointer (i.e. the Derived class). You get this dynamic dispatch just by adding the virtual keyword in front of the calcDerivedMethod() declaration in Base.

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