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I don't have much experience in machine learning, pattern recognition, data mining, etc. and in their underlying theory and systems.

I would like to develop an artificial model of the time it takes a human to make a move in a given Sudoku puzzle.

So what I'm looking for as an output from the machine learning process is a model that can give predictions on how long does it take for a target human to make a move in a given Sudoku situation.

Same input doesn't always map to same outcome. It takes different times for the human to make a move with the same situation, but my hypothesis is that there's a tendency in the resulting probability distribution. (My educated guess is that it is ~normal.)

I have ideas about the factors that influence the distribution (like #empty slots) but would preferably leave it to the system to figure these patterns out. Please notice, that I'm not interested in the patterns, just the model.

I can generate sample and test data easily by running sudoku puzzles and measuring the times it takes to make the moves.

What kind of learning algorithm would you suggest to use for this?

I was thinking NNs, but I'm not sure if they can have the desired property of giving weighted random outcomes for the same input.

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how can you build a model of something if you don't know how that something behaves??? and what goold would neural networks -- or any kind of "learning algorithm" -- be in this situation? –  hop Nov 27 '09 at 20:00
    
The point of NNs and other learning systems would be that we wouldn't have to necessary know the underlying patterns, the "trained patterns" in a learning system automatically encodes these sometimes quite delicate and subtle patterns inside them -- that's one of their great power. I agree that it might vague to propose a pattern extraction based on general sudoku situations, without defining a more specific input vector of variables. My concern would not be the inputs, but instead, the output as described above. I don't understand the down vote. –  Ashley Simpson Nov 27 '09 at 23:51
    
The downvote seems unfair to me. The question is fairly specific and programming related. The problem itself may be really hard, or even impossible, but that doesn't make it an invalid question. –  StompChicken Nov 28 '09 at 11:27
    
if it were not programming related, i'd have voted to close. that's not what downvotes are for. –  hop Nov 28 '09 at 15:00
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This is a fine question. Ashley wants to train a system so that, given a partly filled grid, it can estimate how long a human will take to make the next move. (The mention of neural nets at the end can just be ignored, I think.) –  Jason Orendorff Dec 3 '09 at 17:50
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3 Answers

If I understand this correctly you have an input vector of length 81, which contains 1 if the square is filled in and 0 otherwise. You want to learn a function which returns a probability distribution which models the response time of a human to that board position.

My first response would be that this is a regression problem and you should try straightforward linear regression. This will not provide you with a distribution of response times, but a single 'best-guess' response time.

I'm not clear on why you want to model a distribution of response times. However, if you really want to do want to output a distribution then it sounds like you want to look at Bayesian methods. I'm not really an expert on Bayesian inference, so I can't help you much further here.

However, I don't really think your approach is going to work because I agree with your intuition about features such as the number of empty slots being important. There are also other obvious features, such as the number of empty slots per row/column that are likely to be important. Explicitly putting these features in your representation will probably be much more successful than expecting that the learning algorithm will infer something similar on its own.

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my guess is that 2^81 alone would be too big a search space to make any machine-learning algorithm come up with a good model. also, filled-or-not seems too crude as input to base a model on, but anything more sophisticated will vastly increase the search space. –  hop Nov 28 '09 at 15:40
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The monte carlo method seems like it would work well here but would require a stack of solutions the size of the moon to really do it. And it wouldn't give you the time per person, just the time on average.

My understanding of it, tenuous as it is, is that you have a database with a board position and the time it took a human to make the next move. At the very least you have a starting point for most moves. Even if it's not in the database you could start to calculate how long it would take to make a move based on some algorithm. Though I know you had specified you wanted machine learning to do this it might be worth segmenting the problem into something a little smaller then building on it.

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shotgun answering –  hop Nov 27 '09 at 20:02
    
It's true, but at least I'm trying to answer. What's your advice to the guy? Is Monte Carlo just the wrong answer? Should he not try to break the problem down a little bit? –  Chuck Vose Nov 27 '09 at 22:27
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If you have some guesstimate as to what influences the function (# of empty cell, etc), try to train a classifier on a vector of features, and not on the 81 cells vector (0/1 or 0..9, doesn't really matter for my argument).

I think that your claim:

we wouldn't have to necessary know the underlying patterns, the "trained patterns" in a learning system automatically encodes these sometimes quite delicate and subtle patterns inside them -- that's one of their great power

is wrong. you do have to give the network the right domain. for example, when trying to detect object in an image, working in the pixel domain is pointless. you'll only get results if you first run some feature detection to detect edges, corners, etc. Theoretically, with enough non-linearity (in NN - enough layers in the network) it can detect such things, but in practice, I have never seen that work, without giving the classifier the right features to work with.

I was thinking NNs, but I'm not sure if they can have the desired property of giving weighted random outcomes for the same input.

You're just trying to learn a function from 2^81 or 10^81 (or a much smaller feature space as I suggest) to R (response time between 0 and Inf) or some discretization of that. So NN and other classifiers can do that.

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