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I have created this interface for my Repositories.

public interface IRepository<T, in TKey> where T: class
{
    IEnumerable<T> Find(Expression<Func<T, bool>> predicate);
    IEnumerable<T> FindAll();
    T FindSingle(TKey id);
    void Create(T entity);
    void Delete(T entity);
    void Update(T entity);
}

The FindSingle method accepts an ID, which will be used for searching on Primary Key. By using in I expected that I would only be allowed to pass a reference type as TKey. Out of curiosity I decided to create a concrete class and specify it as an int, so I could see the exception.

I looked up MSDN and it specifies this should not work

Covariance and contravariance in generic type parameters are supported for reference types, but they are not supported for value types.

The class I created looks like this

public class ProjectRepository : IRepository<Project,int>
{
    public IEnumerable<Project> Find(Expression<Func<Project, bool>> predicate)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public IEnumerable<Project> FindAll()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public Project FindSingle(int id)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Create(Project entity)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Delete(Project entity)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Update(Project entity)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Why did I not get an exception on build having specified TKey as a value type? Also, If I removed the in from my parameter what have I lost? the MSDN document says that the contravariance allows using a less derived type, but surely by removing in I can pass any type in as it is still generic.

This is maybe displaying a lack of understanding on contravariance and covariance but it has me a little confused.

share|improve this question
    
I suspect that the compiler did not complain because int is sealed and so will never be put to co- or contra- variant usage. Variance is about how the compiler treats usages of a generically-typed class when derivatives of the variant type are substituted for the base type. E.g. List<Animal> animals = new List<Cat>(); is covariant. And ((IRepository<Cat>)repo).Update(animal); is contravariant. – Keith Payne Aug 7 '13 at 12:09
    
@KeithPayne: List<T> is a class. Co- and contravariance is not supported for classes, hence that code wouldn't compile. The target of the assignment needs to be a covariant interface. – Daniel Hilgarth Aug 7 '13 at 12:15
    
@DanielHilgarth Thanks Daniel. The example should be IEnumerable<Animal> animals = new List<Cat>(); And the second example isn't great either. ((IUpdateOnlyRepository<Cat>)repo).Update(animal); is better because the use of plain old Repository implies methods that would return the variant type also. – Keith Payne Aug 7 '13 at 12:18
    
@KeithPayne: Correct. – Daniel Hilgarth Aug 7 '13 at 12:19
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Covariance and contravariance don't make as much sense on value types, because they are all sealed. Though it's not clear from the documentation, it is valid to use a struct as a co/contravariant type, it's just not always useful. The documentation you reference is most likely referring to that the following is not valid:

public struct MyStruct<in T>

Contravariance means that you can do something like the following example:

IRepository<string, Base> b = //something
IRepository<string, Derived> d = b;

Since there's nothing that derives from int, you can use an IRepository<string, int>, but only as an IRepository<string, int>.

Covariance means that you can do the reverse, e.g. IEnumerable<T> is out T, which is covariant. You can do the following:

IEnumerable<Derived> d = //something
IEnumerable<Base> b = d;

If you're trying to restrict both TKey and T to classes (reference types), you should include a second restriction:

public interface IRepository<T, in TKey>
    where T : class
    where TKey : class
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation, you made it very clear. – James Aug 7 '13 at 12:38

Indeed, you are missing the whole point of co- and contravariance :-) It is about being able to assign a variable of a generic type to another variable of the same generic type but with differing generic type argument(s) that are related to the ones used in the source.
Depending on whether the generic type parameter is co- or contravariant, different assignments are allowed.

Assume the following interface:

public interface IRepository<in T>
{
    void Save(T value);
}

Additionally, assume the following interface along with a value type and a reference type that implement it:

public interface IBar
{
}

public struct BarValueType : IBar
{
}

public class BarReferenceType : IBar
{
}

Finally, assume two variables:

IRepository<BarReferenceType> referenceTypeRepository;
IRepository<BarValueType> valueTypeRepository;

Contravariance now means that you can assign an instance of IRepository<IBar> to the variable referenceTypeRepository, because BarReferenceType implements IBar.
The section from the MSDN you quote simply means that the assignment of an instance of IRepository<IBar> to valueTypeRepository is not legal, although BarValueType also implements IBar.

share|improve this answer

There is no problem in implementing your interface with a value type. You will only get an error when trying to assign an IRepository<Project, object> to a IRepository<Project, int>, for example. In the following code, the last assignment won't compile:

public interface IContravariant<T, in TKey> where T : class
{
    T FindSingle(TKey id);
}
public class objCV : IContravariant<Project, object>
{
    public Project FindSingle(object id)
    {
        return null;
    }
    public static void test()
    {
        objCV objcv = new objCV();

        IContravariant<Project, Project> projcv;
        IContravariant<Project, int> intcv;

        projcv = objcv;
        intcv = objcv;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In this article, they are telling us that the type parameter is treated as invariant by the compiler:

Variance applies only to reference types; if you specify a value type for a variant type parameter, that type parameter is invariant for the resulting constructed type.

From: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd799517.aspx

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