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I'm trying to integrate multiprocessing into a project but I can't get it working. This is what I've got:

import time
import winsound
from multiprocessing import Process
winsound.MessageBeep()
def pr1():
    while 1:
        winsound.MessageBeep()
        time.sleep(0.5)
if __name__ == '__main__':
    p = Process(target=pr1, args=())
    p.start()
    p.join()

while 1:
    print('hey')

but if I run it i hear only one beep and i want it to repeat. How do I get this done?

oke plan b, I've got this now and I only get correct:

import time
import winsound
from multiprocessing import Process
def pr1():
    while 1:
        winsound.MessageBeep()
        print('its working') 
        time.sleep(0.5)
if __name__ == '__main__':
    print('correct')
    p = Process(target=pr1, args=())
    p.start()
    p.join()

while 1:
    print('hey')

So there is something wrong with with the creating of the process. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
if __name__ == '__main__': works? – eri Aug 7 '13 at 12:13
    
I'm not on Windows, so cannot check it, but it looks like it should work. What happens if you add a print statement before or after the call to winsound.MessageBeep()? Can you see it printing something? – piokuc Aug 7 '13 at 12:13
    
that's odd, I can't even get the print hello example on the Python doc page to work. I've never used multiprocessing but I have used threading. Not sure if that would meet your needs, but it works rather well. tutorialspoint.com/python/python_multithreading.htm – multiphrenic Aug 7 '13 at 12:20
    
I changed my code to this and now the only thing on my screen is correct. import time import winsound from multiprocessing import Process def pr1(): while 1: winsound.MessageBeep() print('its working') time.sleep(0.5) if name == 'main': print('correct') p = Process(target=pr1, args=()) p.start() p.join() while 1: print('hey') – CvR_XX Aug 7 '13 at 12:23
    
Update the code in your question. Nobody can read Python in comments. – aychedee Aug 7 '13 at 12:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Indent the final

while 1:
    print('hey')

to make it part of the if-block

When starting the child process under Windows the module contents are first executed before the callable given as target is run. Because the module never finishes execution, this doesn't happen.

The second snippet as a whole then becomes:

import time
import winsound
from multiprocessing import Process
def pr1():
    while 1:
        winsound.MessageBeep()
        print('its working') 
        time.sleep(0.5)
if __name__ == '__main__':
    print('correct')
    p = Process(target=pr1, args=())
    p.start()
    p.join()

    while 1:
        print('hey')
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know what you mean. If indent the while statement, northing happens or do I have to move it? – CvR_XX Aug 7 '13 at 12:54
    
@CvR_XX If you indent it, it is only executed if the if-statement is true (which only happens in parent process). I tried it with your second code snippet and it works for me. – Michael Butscher Aug 7 '13 at 13:01
    
I could be a little sleepy but I still don't understand can you please post the second snippet with you edits. – CvR_XX Aug 7 '13 at 13:06
    
@CvR_XX Done... – Michael Butscher Aug 7 '13 at 13:12
    
the strange thing is that, even with this code, I only see "correct" and not "hey" and "it's working" – CvR_XX Aug 7 '13 at 13:17

To show the "its working" message you need to flush the buffer, because usually in processes the output is normally buffered.

import time
import winsound
from multiprocessing import Process
import sys
def pr1():
    while 1:
        winsound.MessageBeep()
        print('its working')
        time.sleep(0.5)
        sys.stdout.flush()
if __name__ == '__main__':
    print('correct')
    p = Process(target=pr1, args=())
    p.start()
    p.join()
share|improve this answer

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