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I want to ask the user multiple questions. I have two types of questions: Y/N or filename input. I'm not sure how to place this all into a nice if structure. And I'm not sure if I should use 'else' statements too. Could someone help we with this? This is what I have so far:

print "Do you want to import a list (Y/N)?"; # first question yes/no
my $input = <STDIN>;
chomp $input;
    if ($input =~ m/^[Y]$/i){ #match Y or y
        print "Give the name of the first list file:\n";
        my $list1 = <STDIN>; 
        chomp $list1;
        print "Do you want to import another gene list file (Y/N)?";
            if ($input =~ m/^[Y]$/i){
                 print "Give the name of the second list file:\n" # can I use $input or do I need to define another variable?;
                 $list2 = <STDIN>;
                 chomp $list2;
                 print "Do you want to import another gene list file (Y/N)?";
            }
    }
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2  
Why are you using && everywhere.....? Its the strangest thing I've ever seen. A normal statement is ended with semi-colon, not the AND operator. –  TLP Aug 7 '13 at 12:36
1  
Also.. what is your question? How to use if-else? –  TLP Aug 7 '13 at 12:37
    
@TLP I thought && was necessary if you want to do multiple things after each other –  user1987607 Aug 7 '13 at 12:43
    
No, the && operator only works as a logical AND, and it also short-circuits. See perldoc perlop. You can chain statements as a form of if-else structure, e.g. /y/i && print "Contains Y", but that's something else. –  TLP Aug 7 '13 at 13:01
    
@TLP I removed the &&. Now I'm still not sure if I can put the if statements like I did & if I should use an else here, if the answer is not 'Y' the program should just continue –  user1987607 Aug 7 '13 at 13:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

One word: Abstraction.

The solution you currently chose does not scale well, and contains too much repeated code. We will write a subroutine prompt that hides much of the complexity from us:

sub prompt {
  my ($query) = @_; # take a prompt string as argument
  local $| = 1; # activate autoflush to immediately show the prompt
  print $query;
  chomp(my $answer = <STDIN>);
  return $answer;
}

And now a promt_yn that asks for confirmation:

sub prompt_yn {
  my ($query) = @_;
  my $answer = prompt("$query (Y/N): ");
  return lc($answer) eq 'y';
}

We can now write your code in a way that actually works:

if (prompt_yn("Do you want to import a list")){
    my $list1 = prompt("Give the name of the first list file:\n");
    if (prompt_yn("Do you want to import another gene list file")){
         my $list2 = prompt("Give the name of the second list file:\n");
         # if (prompt_yn("Do you want to import another gene list file")){
         # ...
    }
}

Oh, so it seems you actually want a while loop:

if (prompt_yn("Do you want to import a list")){
    my @list = prompt("Give the name of the first list file:\n");
    while (prompt_yn("Do you want to import another gene list file")){
        push @list, prompt("Give the name of the next list file:\n");
    }
    ...; # do something with @list
}

The @list is an array. We can append elements via push.

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Thanks Amon, this makes the code much cleaner indeed. Since I'm a perl newbie, I couldn't have come up with this myself. But I looked everything up in the perldoc & I understand all your commands now. –  user1987607 Aug 7 '13 at 13:31

You can use Sub Routines. This helps you visibly and logically keep everything in-line. for instance


    &main();

    sub main {
        print "Do you want to import a list(Y/N)";
        my $input = ;
        chomp $input;
        if($input =~ m/^[Y]$/i) {
            &importfile();
        } elsif ($input =~ m/^[N]$/i) {
            print "you said no";
        } else {
           print "Invalid option";
        }
    }
    sub importfile
    {
        print "file name please ";
        my $file = STDIN;
        # import and process the file here.....
        &main();
    } 

So you can import at many files this way.

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A while ago I end up with following:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;
use Data::Dumper;


if (&prompt_yn("CONTINUE")){
  my @res = split(" ",&prompt("ENTER INPUT")) ;
  print Dumper @res;
}
else{
  print "EXIT\n";
}

sub prompt_yn{
  my ($query) = @_;
  $query = $query . " (Y/N): ";
  print "$query";
  while (<>) {
    $_ =~ s/^\s+|\s+$//g;
    $_ =~ s/\r|\n//g;
    if ($_ =~ /\S/){
      if ($_ =~ /^y$|^yes$/i){
        # if you want information message about entered value uncomment this
        # print "You have entered Y\n";
        return 1;
      }
      elsif ($_ =~ /^n$|^no$/i){
        # if you want information message about entered value uncomment this
        # print "You have entered N\n";
        return 0;
      }
      else{
        # if you want information message about entered value uncomment this
        # print "You have entered wrong value try again: \n";
      }
    }
    print "$query";
  }
}

sub prompt{
  my ($query) = @_;
  $query = $query . ": ";
  print "$query";
  while (<>) {
    $_ =~ s/^\s+|\s+$//g;
    $_ =~ s/\r|\n//g;
    if ($_ =~ /\S/){
      return $_;
    }
    print "$query";
  }
}

Compared to previous solutions this handles empty inputs.

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