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I have some file like

love.txt  
loveyou.txt 

in directory useful; I want to copy this file to directory /tmp.

I use this command:

find ./useful/ -name "love*" | xargs cp /tmp/

but is doesn't work, just says:

cp: target `./useful/loveyou.txt' is not a directory

when I use this command:

 find ./useful/ -name "love*" | xargs -i cp {} /tmp/

it works fine,

I want to know why the second works, and more about the usage of -i cp {}.

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1  
what's wrong with cp ./useful/love* /tmp/? –  sehe Aug 7 '13 at 13:31
    
This will work with GNU cp without -i, as so: find ./useful/ -name "love*" -print0 | xargs -0 cp -t /tmp –  Charles Duffy Aug 7 '13 at 13:31
    
...note that using xargs without -0 is dangerous, because it separates filenames with newlines, but a newline is a valid character within filenames on UNIX. –  Charles Duffy Aug 7 '13 at 13:31
5  
@BlackMamba this website is much nicer without profanities –  Graham Griffiths Aug 7 '13 at 13:33

5 Answers 5

You might avoid xargs that way:

find ./useful/ -name "love*" -exec sh -c 'cp "$@" /tmp' sh {} +
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When using the xargs -i command, {} is substituted with each element you find. So, in your case, for both "loveyou.txt" and "love.txt", the following command will be run:

cp ./useful/loveyou.txt /tmp/
cp ./useful/love.txt /tmp/

if you omit the {}, all the elements you find will automatically be inserted at the end of the command, so, you will execute the nonsensical command:

cp /tmp/ ./useful/loveyou.txt ./useful/love.txt
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2  
when running without -i, the cp command will only be executed once with all arguments passed as a list, no? e.g. try it using 'echo' –  Graham Griffiths Aug 7 '13 at 13:44
    
@GrahamGriffiths You are absolutely correct. Updated answer accordingly. Can be demonstrated if piping it to xargs echo AAA. –  Erik A. Brandstadmoen Aug 7 '13 at 13:57

The first example will do this:

cp /tmp/ love.txt loveyou.txt

Which can't be done, since they attempt to copy the directory /tmp and the file love.txt to the file loveyou.txt.

In the second example, -i tells xargs to replace every instance of {} with the argument, so it will do:

cp love.txt /tmp/
cp loveyou.txt /tmp/
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2  
when running without -i, the cp command will only be executed once with all arguments passed as a list, no? e.g. try it using 'echo' –  Graham Griffiths Aug 7 '13 at 13:44
    
@GrahamGriffiths: you're right. I was thinking of the example of xargs -n 1. I'll correct this. –  Nathan Fellman Aug 7 '13 at 13:54

xargs appends the values fed in as a stream to the end of the command - it does not run the command once per input value. If you want the same command run multiple times - that is what the -i cp {} syntax is for.

This works well for commands which accept a list of arguments at the end (e.g. grep) - unfortunately cp is not one of those - it considers the arguments you pass in as directories to copy to, which explains the 'is not a directory' error.

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xargs puts the words coming from the standard input to the end of the argument list of the given command. The first form therefore creates

cp /tmp/ ./useful/love.txt ./useful/loveyou.txt

Which does not work, because there are more than 2 arguments and the last one is not a directory.

The -i option tells xargs to process one file at a time, though, replacing {} with its name, so it is equivalent to

cp ./useful/love.txt    /tmp/
cp ./useful/loveyou.txt /tmp/

Which clearly works well.

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