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I have a winforms TabControl and I am trying to cycle through all the controls contained in each tab. Is there a way to add and in a foreach loop or isn't it possible to evaluate more than one group of items? For example this is what I'd like to do:

foreach (Control c in tb_Invoices.Controls and tb_Statements.Controls)
{
    //do something
}

OR

foreach (Control c in tb_Invoices.Controls, tb_Statements.Controls)
{
    //do something
}

Is this possible, and if not, what is the next best thing? Do I need to use a for loop?

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Are the two collections the same type? If so you can look at concatenating them (like in your example). But if they are different then what if there are five items in one collection and eight in another? Would the loop go round five times or eight times? Would it be clear? –  Belogix Aug 7 '13 at 13:55
    
@Belogix This is winforms and both are collections of controls in a TabPage, and will therefore be mutually exclusive (controls can only have one parent). They will also by definition all be Controls (or subclasses thereof. –  lc. Aug 7 '13 at 13:58
    
Do you mind if I ask what action you're attempting to perform on the control for both invoices AND statements? I'm having trouble why you would want to handle separate things together in your code. –  RavB Aug 7 '13 at 13:58
    
@lc. I was trying to highlight that in THIS instance they are but that it would be unlikely that foreach would work this way because of the reason I stated, i.e. they could well be different things. BTW I've clarified that point. –  Belogix Aug 7 '13 at 13:59
    
@baultista: Sure. It's an "Options" dialog box and I want to store all the settings in the database, therefore I want to loop through all the controls and store the name of each control and its value in the database. See this question. –  gnarlybracket Aug 7 '13 at 14:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
foreach(TabPage page in yourTabControl.TabPages){
   foreach(Control c in page.Controls){
      LoopThroughControls(c);
   }  
}

private void LoopThroughControls(Control parent){
   foreach(Control c in parent.Controls)
      LoopThroughControls(c);
}
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I like it - more readable –  Sergey Berezovskiy Aug 7 '13 at 14:01
    
@lazyberezovsky thanks, sometimes we don't need linq for a very simple logic :) –  King King Aug 7 '13 at 14:07
    
Great simple answer! Appreciate it. –  gnarlybracket Aug 7 '13 at 14:25

Final solution:

var allControls = from TabPage p in tabControl.TabPages
                  from Control c in p.Controls
                  select c;

Original answer - use Concat:

var allControls = tb_Invoices.Controls.Cast<Control>()
                             .Concat(tb_Statements.Controls.Cast<Control>();

BTW I think it's better to use simple non-generic ArrayList here

ArrayList allControls = new ArrayList();
allControls.AddRange(tb_Invoices.Controls);
allControls.AddRange(tb_Statements.Controls);
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you prefer the non-generic here? How will the foreach work? –  dlras2 Aug 7 '13 at 14:03
    
@DanRasmussen to avoid casting. How would you use generic collection with non-generic ControlCollection? Why wouldn't foreach work? You think it works only with generics? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Aug 7 '13 at 14:05
    
Wouldn't the foreach loop require casting anyways? You don't want to be iterating over objects. –  dlras2 Aug 7 '13 at 14:09
1  
@DanRasmussen that will be one background casting, instead of explicit casting each controls collection while adding to all controls list. I still think that it's better than Concat solution. Anyway, my final answer is different –  Sergey Berezovskiy Aug 7 '13 at 14:11

What I like to do is:

var list = new List<T>();
list.AddRange(list1);
list.AddRange(list2);
list.AddRange(list3);
list.AddRange(list4);

foreach (T item in list)
{
    .....
}
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1  
Why on earth would you prefer that to Concat extension method? –  gwiazdorrr Aug 7 '13 at 15:00
    
Oh, I mainly work with .NET v2.0. That's why. –  EZSlaver Aug 7 '13 at 15:34
1  
You can do better, without creating a new list each time. See my answer. –  gwiazdorrr Aug 8 '13 at 8:25

You can do using one foreach loop by writing it recursively. This will ensure to loop through all the controls of all types in your form.

private void LoopAllControls(Control YourObject)
   foreach(Control c in YourObject.Controls)
   {
      if(C.Controls.Count > 0)
        LoopAllControls(c.Controls);
      //your code
   }
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You could do:

public static void ForAllChildren(Action<Control> action, 
    params Control[] parents)
{
    foreach(var p in parents)
        foreach(Control c in p.Controls)
            action(c);
}

Called like:

ForAllChildren(x => Foo(x), tb_Invoices, tb_Statements);

You might be hit a little on performance for the action invocation though in which case you could just use a nested foreach:

foreach (var p in new Control[] { tb_Invoices, tb_Statements })
    foreach (Control c in p.Controls)
        Foo(c);

Similarly, a generic solution to loop through all items in any non-generic IEnumerable might be (although a bit like using a sledgehammer to drive a nail):

public static void ForEachAll<T>(Action<T> action, 
    params System.Collections.IEnumerable[] collections)
{
    foreach(var collection in collections)
        foreach(var item in collection.Cast<T>())
            action(item);
}

Called like:

ForEachAll<Control>(x => Foo(x), tb_Invoices.Controls, tb_Statements.Controls);
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If you are not in a position to use LINQ (like stuck with .NET2), I suggest you use this method:

public static IEnumerable<T> Concat<T>(params IEnumerable<T>[] args)
{
    foreach (IEnumerable<T> collection in args)
    {
        foreach (T item in collection)
        {
            yield return item;
        }
    }
}

Now you have a generic function that you can use with anything that's enumerable. Your loop can look like this:

foreach (Control c in Concat(tb_Invoices.Controls, tb_Statements.Controls))
{
    //do something
}

Simple, cheap and expressive!

EDIT: if your collection do not implement IEnumerable<T> but only IEnumerable, you can add an overload that will accept the latter. Everything stays the same, except that T changes to object in the nested loop.

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