Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to create a patient/sample metadata table using an entity-attribute-value (EAV) approach.

Question: How should I handle the varying column type of the value (e.g. string, numeric, or foreign key to dictionary table) based on the attribute?

Note: I am not asking whether or not to use an EAV approach. I have looked at other SO questions and references and believe this is the best approach for my use-case (e.g. I don't want to create a seperate column or table for each attribute - which can number in the hundreds). However, I will certainly reconsider other designs given a comprehensive example.

Representative Data

A patient/sample (entity) can have multiple metadata attributes (e.g. lab location, survival, tumor type) each with a different value type (e.g. VARCHAR, NUMBER, FOREIGN_KEY*, respectively).

*FOREIGN_KEY means that this value type is a foreign key ID (INTEGER) to a dictionary table of values (e.g. a list of the 10 possible tumor types). So lab location can be VARCHAR since I don't care about normalizing those values. But tumor type should have some degree of validation.

My table layout may look something like this:

CREATE TABLE patients (
  patient_id INTEGER CONSTRAINT pk_patients PRIMARY KEY,
  patient_name VARCHAR2(50) NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE metadata_attributes (
  attribute_id INTEGER CONSTRAINT pk_metadata_attributes PRIMARY KEY,
  attribute_name VARCHAR2(50) NOT NULL,
  attribute_value_type VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL -- e.g. VARCHAR, NUMBER, or ID
);

CREATE TABLE patient_metadata (
  patient_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_patients REFERENCES patients(patient_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_attributes REFERENCES metadata_attributes(attribute_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_value ???
);

I believe need a value type identifying column (attribute_value_type) in the metadata_attributes table to know which column/table to look to.

Possible Approaches

Here are two possible approaches I can think of.

Approach 1: Single EAV table with multiple columns

Create three different columns to the patient_metadata table - one for each value type.

CREATE TABLE patient_metadata (
  patient_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_patients REFERENCES patients(patient_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_attributes REFERENCES metadata_attributes(attribute_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_varchar_value VARCHAR(50),
  attribute_number_value NUMBER,
  attribute_id_value CONSTRAINT fk_pm_values REFERENCES some_table_of_values(value_id)
);

Approach 2: Multiple EAV tables

Create three different patient_metadata tables - one for each value type.

CREATE TABLE patient_metadata_varchar (
  patient_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_patients REFERENCES patients(patient_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_attributes REFERENCES metadata_attributes(attribute_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_value VARCHAR(50) NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE patient_metadata_number (
  patient_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_patients REFERENCES patients(patient_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_attributes REFERENCES metadata_attributes(attribute_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_value NUMBER NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE patient_metadata_id (
  patient_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_patients REFERENCES patients(patient_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_id CONSTRAINT fk_pm_attributes REFERENCES metadata_attributes(attribute_id) NOT NULL,
  attribute_value CONSTRAINT fk_pm_values REFERENCES some_table_of_values(value_id) NOT NULL
);

Other Approaches?

Are there other approaches out there?

In short, I want to respect relational integrity as much as possible and allow the database to know the value type so that it can perform basic validation. However, I believe both of the above approaches will require some type of manual integrity checks (approach 1 requires a check that only one attribute_value column is populated, etc.).

The types of queries that I will perform will be typical (e.g. retrieve a list of values for a given metadata attribute, retrieve a list of values for a given patient (entity) and metadata attribute, etc.). I believe I'll need to query for the value type in most cases in order to know which column or table to query. Any other way around this?

What are the pros and cons for all approaches (performance, query structure, etc.)?

First time poster, so thanks in advance and please feel free to comment on formatting or further clarification!

share|improve this question
1  
Hi, I think you are facing something that called polymorphic key phenomenon. –  kisp Aug 9 '13 at 8:48
2  
I think this Wikipedia page covers a lot of ground: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Rene Aug 14 '13 at 11:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a well known problem. The problem with the approach you mentioned is that you need to know the type of the attribute before you query for it. it's not the end of the world because you manage metadata but still...

Two possiable solutions might be

  1. using a varchar2 datatype to represent all data types in a known format. Numbers and chars are no problem, date values can be written in a predefined manner (it's like implementing to_String() in any OO design).
  2. use the ANYDATA data type. i personally played around with it but decided not to use it.
share|improve this answer
4  
-1 Never store dates and numbers as strings. It will cause a a ton of problems. For example, someone will inevitably write a predicate like this: where attribute = 'DOB' and to_date(value, 'YYYY-MM-DD') < date '2000-01-01'. It looks reasonable but it is very dangerous, even if all of your data is clean. Using different columns for different types does not cause extra work. You have to know the type to do anything remotely interesting with the data. –  Jon Heller Aug 24 '13 at 20:47
2  
It's obviously not optimal to store numbers as strings but I disagree with your Statement - This is a design question and the "risk" you take is here is is dependent on your database access layer. –  haki Aug 25 '13 at 6:23
    
Thanks, didn't know about the ANYDATA type - looks very interesting! Any reason you decided not to use it? –  lebolo Aug 28 '13 at 14:17
4  
@lebolo I recently built a system using ANYDATA, but had to replace ANYDATA for several reasons. 1) Serious performance issues with pipelined functions. 2) The API requires PL/SQL too often, not enough access functions. 3) Type mismatches do not raise exceptions, requiring additional checks. 4) No database tool supports ANYDATA, including SQL*Plus, SQL Developer, or either PL/SQL debugger. 5) Unresolved bugs, such as problems when mixing 32 and 64 bit clients and servers. –  Jon Heller Sep 4 '13 at 3:37

The easiest, most performant, etc is to convert all values in the database to Strings. Problems such as those indicated will usually be obvious, and even well typed columns suffer exactly the same kind of issues, which usually express as performance problems.

With a little care, you can maintain collation order, if that matters (e.g. by formatting dates as year/month/day), and validation of types should not be done by the database anyway as it is too late. Negative numbers are a pain, as are floats, but it is highly unusual to index by a number that can be negative or a float, and in-memory sorts are generally fast.

Where the type of the data is not obvious, or needs to be known by a downstream processor, then add a type column.

Generally, all integrity constraints against column values can be checked before the record is written, either in code (good), or in triggers (not so good). Trying to use the native features with varying types will only take you so far, and is probably not so useful anyway as values often have many business specific constraints anyway e.g. birth-date needs to be non-null and after 1900.

For performance, use compound indexes including the entity and attribute as prefixes. Indexes may be partitioned by the entity-attribute prefix, reducing any impact of the extra depth of the index, and they compress really well (the prefix will compress to one or two bytes), so the size difference is minimal.

Querying from EAV tables is often best done in views which will unpack the entities for you so that the structure can be returned to something like you would expect, though this may be irrelevant if you are dealing with varying columns e.g. in patient forms which are characterized by a large number of varying elements depending on the history. Then it is probably easier to process in your business logic.

Finally, nowadays this kind of data is simply not stored in column oriented relational database style. It is usually stored as a XML (or JSON) document (XML types in Oracle), and most databases provide some native XML processing capability in order to search and manipulate such data. This is okay for normal form storage and retrieval, but tends to make arbitrary queries such as "give me all patients over 60 who have had pneumonia in the last year" rather slow, or a bit more involved as tagged reverse indexing is needed. Nevertheless it is worth seeing if a document orientated/text oriented approach is a better solution.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.