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I'm bulding an application in Java with Play 2. I was modelling different classes of people, each with different relationships to some other classes related to an application process. Each Application has a Signatory, a CertificateHolder, and an EnrolmentOfficer.

I realised that since one person could be any or all of those things, it was redundant to store the information on them three times. So some refactoring was in order!

I decided to have a single Person class that would store one of each of the Signatory, CertificateHolder, and EnrolmentOfficer classes via object composition. I could then access any of their properties using person.signatory. notation.

What I'm wondering is this: since the three specialised classes do not exist outside of a Person, would I better achieve my goal using inner classes? I mean like so:

public class Person {

    public class Signatory {
        // Signatory fields go here
    }

    public class CertificateHolder {
        // CertificateHolder fields go here
    }

    public class EnrolmentOfficer {
        // EnrolmentOfficer fields go here
    }

    // More general Person code goes here
}

It would seem to remove my need to store a seprate entity in the database for each Signatory, CertificateHolder, and EnrolmentOfficer, but I'm not sure if ebean can properly translate this design into a database schema.

Which method better suits my purpose?

EDIT: The inner class method does not work; it's incompatible with the way ebean handles relationships. I'm going to ask a moderator to delete this topic.

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Why not use inheritance? public class Signatory extends Person{}, then you can persist a Signatory i guess. –  Fernando Aug 7 '13 at 14:18
    
That was my original design, but that requires me to have seperate Signatory and Enrolment objects for one person who does both. The composition method I'm moving to at least allows me to remove redundant personal information and relate the three roles under one entity. –  evanjdooner Aug 7 '13 at 14:22
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2 Answers

You could/should use inheritance since each of Signatory, CertificateHolder, and EnrolmentOfficer IS-A Person and the fields of person are common in oll classes derived from it. The classes should be:

class Signatory extends Person{
...
}


class CertifiedHolder extends Person{
...
}


class EnlormentOfficer extends Person{
...
}

If you use Hibernate/JPA you can apply inheritance on the Entities and consequently on the database Tables: Have a look Entity Inheritance.

Regarding your comment, you can have a class also derive from one from your Subclasses and hence "combine" the two functionalities.

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My issue is that one person can be all three of those classes simultaneously. I currently have an inheritance model in place, using an abstract MappedSuperclass. This still leaves me with creating three separate entities to refer to one person, that are not naturally grouped under one umbrella entity, which is what I'm aiming for. –  evanjdooner Aug 7 '13 at 14:43
    
You could then use three interfaces containing the respective methods needed by each group of Person, but I am not sure if nad how can it be applied in database. –  arjacsoh Aug 7 '13 at 14:45
    
Looking at the way ebean handles relationships, I think my composition design is the only way to go. Each of the three specialised classes have a relationship to Application, and I don't think I could implement that using interfaces, as my Person entity would have three relations to Application. Ebean doesn't seem to like that. Anyway, I'm going to go ahead and delete this question, because the Inner Class method doesn't work at all. Thanks for the advice though! –  evanjdooner Aug 7 '13 at 14:49
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In this case you can extract unique behavior from Signatory and Enrolment using interfaces:

public interface Signatory
{
 //signatory methods only
}

public interface Enrolment
{
  //enrolment methods only
}

Then

public class EnrolmentPerson extends Person implements Enrolment
{
}

public class SignatoryPerson extends Person implements Enrolment
{
}

The idea is to filter common behavior using interfaces.

Or maybe you can try the Decorator pattern and decorate your Person models? This will allow you to 'chain' person behavior recursively, under one umbrella. A lot of java.io classes are 'decorated' in this way. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decorator_pattern

Example (i didn't test it):

public interface Person
{
  public void doSomething();
}

public class SimplePerson implements Person
{
 public void doSomething()
 {
   System.out.println("normal person doing things");
 }
}

public abstract class PersonDecorator implements Person
{ 
  Person decoratedPerson;

  public PersonDecorator(Person decoratedPerson)
  {
    this.decoratedPerson = decoratedPerson;
  }

  public void doSomething()
  {
   decoratedPerson.doSomething();
  }
}

public class EnrolmentPerson extends PersonDecorator
{
  public EnrolmentPerson(Person decoratedPerson)
  {
     super(decoratedPerson);
  }

  public void doSomething()
  {
    super.doSomething();
    this.doEnrolmentSomething();
  }

  public void doEnrolmentSomething()
  {
    System.out.println("enrolment person doing something");
  }
}

Hope it helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Well, since this is the model I think this is not a way to define the data model, but I'd like to know your perspective and how Decorator pattern could help for this specific case. –  Omar Aug 7 '13 at 14:38
    
I edited my answer. –  Fernando Aug 7 '13 at 14:55
    
Ok. I think the model shouldn't do anything but represent the database and probably the model (depending on the application sort) could know how to persist itself, but with this you're suggesting is like a "mix" of controller and model. –  Omar Aug 7 '13 at 15:28
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