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This question already has an answer here:

For reference I am referring to the answer in this post

The author of the answer gives the following code

def sum(*values, **options):
    s = 0
    for i in values:
        s = s + i
    if "neg" in options:
        if neg:
            s = -s
    return s

s = sum(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)            # returns 15
s = sum(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, neg=True)  # returns -15
s = sum(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, neg=False) # returns 15

However when I run on mine I get the following error

NameError: global name 'neg' is not defined

Can anyone explain this. And in general, how does the function know when values ends and when options begins

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marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters, glglgl, Saullo Castro, T I, madth3 Aug 8 '13 at 0:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 4 down vote accepted
if neg:

That line is buggy. It should be:

if options["neg"]:

How does the function know when values ends and when options begins?

Unnamed values go in *values. Keyword arguments go in **options.

share|improve this answer
1  
if options.get("neg", False): includes both if conditions. – glglgl Aug 7 '13 at 14:40
    
@glglgl The shorter code seems to be slower by a factor of about 2.4. I'm guessing it's due to the dict.get method call. – RussW Aug 7 '13 at 14:58
    
@RussW Oups! Ok, but in the case of a multi-threading program, it is free of a race condition. – glglgl Aug 7 '13 at 15:17
    
@glglgl I guess you got me there. +1 – RussW Aug 7 '13 at 15:25

You have made a small mistake. Change your code to the following and it should work. Just get the value of "neg" from the options dictionary, (values holds the unnamed arguments and options holds the keyword arguments)

>>> def sum(*values, **options):
        s = 0
        for i in values:
            s = s + i
        if "neg" in options:
            if options["neg"]:
                s = -s
        return s

>>> s = sum(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, neg=True)
>>> s
-15
>>> sum(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
15
>>> sum(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, neg=True)
-15
>>> sum(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, neg=False)
15

Although, as @glglgl pointed out, changing your code to the following consumes both the if statements into one.

>>> def sum(*values, **options):
    s = 0
    for i in values:
        s = s + i
    if options.get("neg", False):
            s = -s
    return s

How does get(...) work?

If the options dictionary doesn't have a key "neg", (as handled by your first if condition), then, get(...) returns the default value of False and s is not negated, and if options contains "neg", then it's value is returned, in which case, s is negated depending on the value in the dictionary.

share|improve this answer
    
if options.get("neg", False): includes both if conditions. – glglgl Aug 7 '13 at 14:40
1  
@glglgl : True. Thanks. Added to the answer and referenced to you. :) – Sukrit Kalra Aug 7 '13 at 14:43

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