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In a project, I have been using a Bluetooth module (Panasonic PAN1321) to transfer real-time data from some sensors to an Android tablet at approx 200Hz (this is the rate at which data packets are transferred). Now I am considering to use WiFi instead. My understanding is that it has longer range and is more robust. Plus many wireless systems out there use it so it will be easier to integrate my system with the existing setups. I intend to use Bluegiga WF121 as my WiFi node. This module offers TCP or UDP communication. I have no knowledge of TCP or UDP. I would really appreciate if someone has answers to the following questions:

  • Is it worthwhile to shift from Bluetooth to Wifi?
  • Will I be able to do point-to-point data transfer between my WiFi module and an Android tablet (just like my bluetooth module)?
  • On WiFi can I achieve a data transfer rate of upto 500Hz with a data packet size of approx 80 to 120 bytes? 500Hz is more than enough for real-time feedback in my project but 200Hz will also suffice. Having even lower data transfer rate is possible but this will increase memory requirement for my embedded system and that can be a bottle-neck.
  • There is a time-stamp included in the data packet so timing of packets is not important however order of packets is more important. Packet loss is also not important as long as I can get upto 500 data packets per second (max. 60000 bytes/sec). I am not sure if it will be too much for the WiFi.
  • Should I start development with TCP or UDP?
  • I want to use WiFi on my Android tablet only to communicate with the WiFi module for the sensors and use 3G/4G on the tablet for internet connectivity. Is this possible to do?

Looking forward to your answers/discussion. Cheers

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I usually say use udp unless you have a reason for tcp, remember tcp is streaming not packet (from a programmers perspective) so you basically have to parse it as a stream. udp, IF you get the packets then it is a complete packet. –  dwelch Aug 7 '13 at 15:22
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Question 1: Is it worthwhile? Sorry, you have to decide that one yourself once you understand the trade-offs (including development time)

Question 2: Point-to-point? Yes

Question 3: Transfer at 500 Hz? 500 msg per second * 200 bytes per message(allowing protocol overhead) * 8 bits per byte = 0.8 GHz. So it's theoretically possible on a 1Ghz channel. However this assumes perfect senders & receivers, so you might not do quite that well. If you can WiFi at 10Ghz you should be fine. As a general rule UDP is faster than TCP due to less protocol overhead.

Question 4: Reliability. TCP guarantees delivery in order but you have to find the message boundaries yourself. UDP is a best-effort protocol for both delivery and ordering of messages, but the packet boundaries match the message boundaries simplifying the receiving code. It's possible to build reliability on top of UDP, but you are basically reinventing TCP. It is also possible to reorder UDP packets and/or skip out-of-order ones so it appears like they were lost if they show up in the wrong order.

Question 4: TCP or UDP. I'd say UDP (edited)

Question 5: WiFi for tablet, 3G/4G for Internet? Not sure on this one. If you use IP addressing and don't configure a DNS server for WiFi you might be able to force internet traffic onto the phone network, but that's just aguess.

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  • 200Hz = once every 5ms.
  • 500Hz = once every 2ms.

If you ping devices on a local network you will usually see that latency is below 1ms. So far no problem to send 0 byte of data in that frequency without creating some sort of big buffer.

Regarding bandwidth:

[WP]: 802.11b has a maximum raw data rate of 11 Mbit/s [...] in practice the maximum 802.11b throughput that an application can achieve is about 5.9 Mbit/s using TCP and 7.1 Mbit/s using UDP.

If you assume a rather slow outdated 11MBit WiFi connection you should have no problem sending your data. Bluetooth is low power, low bandwidth technology and therefore much slower. 6Mbit/s would mean you could transfer at ~ 4kHz.


My understanding is that it has longer range and is more robust.

Correct, basically because it uses more power.

Is it worthwhile to shift from Bluetooth to Wifi?

Yes, if the low range & bandwidth limits you. If not, why implement something new.

Will I be able to do point-to-point data transfer between my WiFi module and an Android tablet (just like my bluetooth module)?

  • UDP can be either broadcasted or directed. There is no connection between devices.
  • TCP needs a point to point connection.
  • both are no problem to use on Android, once you have the network permission apps can recieve both just fine. See any generic Java TCP/UDP tutorial how.

On WiFi can I achieve a data transfer rate of upto 500Hz with a data packet size of approx 80 to 120 bytes?

No problem as long as the connection is good enough.

There is a time-stamp included in the data packet so timing of packets is not important however order of packets is more important.

TCP guarantees packet order. UDP does not. (There are implementations on top of UDP that act like a TCP connection)

Packet loss is also not important as long as I can get upto 500 data packets per second (max. 60000 bytes/sec).

TCP also guarantees that there is no packet loss while the connection is established. If a packet is lost (which is already rare on a local network) TCP will re-request it. Your application does not see anything but a constant stream of ordered packets. UDP has no guarantees. You application gets packets in whatever order they arrive (I would assume right order in local network, there is basically nothing that can re-order them) and it will not see them if they are lost.

Should I start development with TCP or UDP?

TCP sounds better. It's also simpler to implement if you want to have no packet loss / re-ordering because that's implemented in the TCP stack.

I want to use WiFi on my Android tablet only to communicate with the WiFi module for the sensors and use 3G/4G on the tablet for internet connectivity. Is this possible to do?

You could create a server of some sort that is reachable over the internet and have devices connect to that. Server can then relay data it recieves from the sensors to devices that are only 3G connected. I don't think you can implement that into a sensor but it's not impossible. The 3G case would mean that either the server or the sensor needs to be the one that accepts connections from the internet. You can't reach a device that's on 3G since mobile networks are usually firewalled, behind NATs etc. Mobile bandwidth is also often much lower than the 60000 bytes/sec you target. Depends on country / provider / location / .. if you can transmit that much.

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thank you for your answer. sorry for replying so late. i got busy with some other stuff. cheers –  Simpleton Oct 27 '13 at 20:38
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