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Whenever I write a new class or struct that is likely to hold some data, that may need to be compared, I always implement IEquatable<T> as this provides the class/struct with a strongly typed .Equals(T other) method.

example:

public struct Radius : IEquatable<Radius>
{
    public Int32 TopLeft { get; set; }
    public Int32 TopRight { get; set; }
    public Int32 BottomLeft { get; set; }
    public Int32 BottomRight { get; set; }

    public bool Equals(Radius other)
    {
        return this.TopLeft == other.TopLeft
            && this.TopRight == other.TopRight
            && this.BottomLeft == other.BottomLeft
            && this.BottomRight == other.BottomRight;
    }
}

As well as providing an implementation for .Equals(Radius other), I should really override the default implementation too (.Equals(object obj))

I have two options here, and my question is, which of these implementations is better?

Option 1 is to use casting:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    return this.Equals((Radius)obj);
}

Option 2 is to use the "as" keyword:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    return this.Equals(obj as Radius);
}

My reason for asking this is, using casting will throw an exception if obj cannot be cast to Radius, whereas as will resolve to null if it cannot be cast, therefore it just checks this against null, without throwing an exception; So is it better to throw an exception, or to just return false?

EDIT: As it has been pointed out by quite a few fellow SO'ers, structs cannot be null, therefore the second option does not apply for a struct. Therefore another question springs to mind: Should the overridden implementation of .Equals(object obj) be identical for structs and classes?

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1  
Your Equals(Radius) method should return false if other is null, otherwise it will throw an exception with null input. –  cdhowie Aug 7 '13 at 15:36
    
@cdhowie It's a struct, it can't be null. –  Servy Aug 7 '13 at 15:37
    
You can't use the as keyword as Radius isn't a nullable type. You should instead use is to return false for other types, and then just cast. –  Servy Aug 7 '13 at 15:38
    
@Servy I missed that. In that event, it can still be done with one type-check by using an as-cast to a nullable type: var radius = obj as Radius?; return radius == null ? false : Equals(radius.Value); One should always prefer as over is-followed-by-parenthetical-cast as it only performs one type check. –  cdhowie Aug 7 '13 at 15:39
1  
@cdhowie A 30% increase in speed of one of the fastest possible operations that can be performed. That's an entirely negligible difference in performance, to the point that even mentioning it isn't worthwhile in virtually any application, ever. Using as would make sense if the type itself were nullable, and you wanted the nullable result, but sense it's not logically nullable the work you're doing to translate it back effectively removes the advantage gained. The two solutions are quite equivalent, the differences are almost entirely subjective preference, no more. –  Servy Aug 7 '13 at 15:49
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The Equals() method must never throw an exception.

An object of a different type is merely unequal.

Quoting the documentation:

Implementations of Equals must not throw exceptions; they should always return a value. For example, if obj is null, the Equals method should return false instead of throwing an ArgumentNullException.

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"An object of a different type" -- or no object at all (null). –  cdhowie Aug 7 '13 at 15:36
    
Unless the object you are calling Equals on is null –  chris warner Aug 7 '13 at 15:37
1  
@chriswarner: In that case, the exception is thrown before entering Equals(). –  SLaks Aug 7 '13 at 15:38
1  
@chriswarner: The source says if (this == null) //this is necessary to guard against reverse-pinvokes and throw new NullReferenceException(); //other callers who do not use the callvirt instruction –  SLaks Aug 7 '13 at 15:44
1  
@SLaks It has a great deal to do with it when one is using pointers. In safe code, a null test is not necessary as using a member of a null object will raise a NullReferenceException, which is perfectly acceptable in the face of broken code. An access violation caused by pointer arithmetic on a null object is not acceptable. –  cdhowie Aug 7 '13 at 16:04
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As @SLaks already mentioned Equals() should never throw.

In this special case i think a usage of the is operator combined with a cast should help you out:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
     if(obj is Radius)
         return Equals((Radius)obj);

     return false;
}

In cases where you have a class you should simply use the as operator:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
     return Equals(obj as MyObj);
}

public bool Equals(MyObj obj)
{
     if(ReferenceEquals(obj, null))
         return false;

     // ToDo: further checks for equality.
}
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Thanks, that gives me a very clear, concise example of how I should implement things. –  series0ne Aug 8 '13 at 9:13
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My personal opinion would be to use the second option, or even check before hand if the object is a "Radius" and then return false so that the intent is more clear

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