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I came across this weird behaviour with nested for loops and I can't for the light of me explain this. Is this a python-specific thing or am I just overseeing something?

This is the code I'm running:

for i in range(16):
    if i == 0:
        for j in range(8):
            print 'i is (if) ' + str(i)
            i = i + 1
    else:
        print 'i is (else)' + str(i)

This is the output I'm getting:

i is (if) 0
i is (if) 1
i is (if) 2
i is (if) 3
i is (if) 4
i is (if) 5
i is (if) 6
i is (if) 7
i is (else)1
i is (else)2
i is (else)3
i is (else)4
i is (else)5
i is (else)6
i is (else)7
i is (else)8
i is (else)9
i is (else)10
i is (else)11
i is (else)12
i is (else)13
i is (else)14
i is (else)15

This is the output I'm expecting:

i is (if) 0
i is (if) 1
i is (if) 2
i is (if) 3
i is (if) 4
i is (if) 5
i is (if) 6
i is (if) 7
i is (else)8
i is (else)9
i is (else)10
i is (else)11
i is (else)12
i is (else)13
i is (else)14
i is (else)15

It seems like the i in the outer for loop and the i in the inner for loop are different variables, although that seems completely counterintuitive to me.

Any input (I'm fairly new to python but couldn't find documentation on this)

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1  
+1 clever question on understanding scope of variables in python –  CyberneticTwerkGuruOrc Aug 7 '13 at 16:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The for loop assigns a new value to i every loop iteration, namely the next value taken from the loop iterable (in this case range(16).

You can modify i in the loop itself, but that doesn't alter the iterable for is working with.

If you wanted to change the loop iterable, then you'd have to do so directly on the iterable:

loop_iterable = iter(range(16))
for i in loop_iterable:
    if i == 0:
        for j in range(8):
            print 'i is (if) ' + str(i)
            i = next(loop_iterable)
    else:
        print 'i is (else)' + str(i)

Here, we create a iterator object from the range(10) sequence by using the iter() function; the for statement does the exact same thing under the hood, but now we can address the iterator directly. The next() function advances the iterator to the next value, just like the for loop would do.

However, it may be easier to just use a while loop instead:

i = 0
while i < 16:
    if i == 0:
        for j in range(8):
            print 'i is (if) ' + str(i)
            i = next(loop_iterable)
    else:
        print 'i is (else)' + str(i)
    i += 1

The thing to remember is that the Python for loop statement is nothing like a C or Java or JavaScript for loop. It is a Foreach loop instead. range() simply generates a sequence of numbers to loop over, as opposed to a C-style for loop, which combines the initial assignment (i = 0), test (i < 16)) and loop incrementer (i += 1) into one statement.

share|improve this answer
    
sigh - as always, concise and to the point. :) –  Lukas Graf Aug 7 '13 at 16:13
    
As a more detailed explanation, from my understanding, what's happening is that the range function returns an iterable, i.e. something that can turn into a list, so what you're doing in the loop is going over each value in the list. Consequentially, you can do whatever you want to that variable since when you iterate the loop again, it'll just take the value from the next 'index' in the 'list' provided by the range function. –  Amndeep7 Aug 7 '13 at 16:15
    
@Amndeep7: In Python 2, range() returns a list, in Python 3 or when using xrange() a dedicated range object is returned. Both the list and the range object are iterable (they are sequences), but they are not iterators. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 7 '13 at 16:20
    
@Amndeep7: Calling iter() on a list or range object returns a specialized iterator object that knows how to handle either type, which keeps a current position that is advanced every time you ask for the next value. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 7 '13 at 16:21
    
@MartijnPieters, first of all, my bad for not mentioning that I was talking about Python3, second, I don't think that I said that the range function was an iterator. I said that it would be possible for you to iterate using the for over the iterable (which is a range object in this case). To clarify further, I shouldn't have used "i.e." in that a list was what range returned, but was usually the end result of its use. –  Amndeep7 Aug 7 '13 at 16:27

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