Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My understanding of an atomic operation is that it should not be possible for the steps of the operation to be interleaved with those of any other operation - that it should be executed as a single unit.

I have a method for creating a database record that will first of all check if a record with the same value, which also satisfies certain other parameters, already exists, and if so will not create the record.

In fakecode:

public class FooDao implements IFooDao {

    @Transactional
    public void createFoo(String fooValue) {
        if (!fooExists(fooValue)) {
            // DB call to create foo
        }
    }

    @Transactional
    public boolean fooExists(String fooValue) {
        // DB call to check if foo exists
    }
}

However I have seen that it is possible for two records with the same value to be created, suggesting that these operations have interleaved in some way. I am aware that with Spring's transactional proxies, self-invocation of a method within an object will not use the transactional logic, but if createFoo() is called from outside the object then I would expect fooExists() to still be included in the same transaction.

Are my expectations as to what transactional atomicity should enforce wrong? Do I need to be using a synchronized block to enforce this?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What a transaction really mean for the database depends on the isolation level. The wikipdia article on Isolation (database systems) explain it well.

Normally one use a not so high isolation level, for example: Read committed. This mean that one can read data from an other transaction not until the other transaction is committed. In your case this is not enough, because this is the opposite from what you want. - So the obvious solution would be using a more restrictive and slower isolation level: Repeatable reads.


But to be honest, I would use an other way: Make the relevant column unique (but do not remove your if (!fooExists(fooValue))-check). So in 99% your check work. In the remaining 1% you will get an exception, because you try to violate the unique constraint.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I can't use a unique constraint on the DB as it isn't strictly unique - as mentioned there are other parameters, and they mean that there can be multiple uses of the same value. –  Ian R.B. Aug 7 '13 at 16:56
add comment

Transactional means all updates occur within the same transaction, ie all updates/inserts/delete succeed or all are rolled back (for example if you update multiple tables).

It doesn't guarantee anything about the behaviour of queries within the transaction, which depend on the RDBMS and its configuration (configuration of the isolation level on the database).

share|improve this answer
add comment

@Transactional does not by default make the code synchronized. Two separate threads can enter the same block at the same time and cause inserts to occur. synchronizing the method isn't really a good answer either since that can drastically affect application performance. If your issue is that two identical records are being created by two different threads you may want to add some indexes with unique constraint on the database so that duplicate inserts will fail.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.