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I am to insert 10 field's value in mysql from php code as it is. The problem is that whenever the user inserts apostrophe and comma(',) the query code is disturbed. some functions are there. But is it necessary to parse all field's value from these functions?? would it not be time consuming :P

here is my php code

$rs = mysql_query("
    insert into 
        _{$pid}_item 
    values (
        '$pid',
        '$item_brand',
        '$item_code',
        '$item_name',
        '$item_quantity',
        '$item_mrp',
        '$i‌tem_discount',
        '$item_vat',
        '$item_sat',
        '$item_selling_price',
        '$item_rating',
        '$item‌​_image'
    )
"); 

I am passing the values to these variables..

share|improve this question
    
It would be a lot easier if you provide some code to look at instead of forcing us to hire fortunetellers to gues where your mistake is ;) –  Hristo Valkanov Aug 7 '13 at 16:43
    
Yes, use prepared statements or input sanitation to correct for that issue. Great software is time consuming. :-) –  phpisuber01 Aug 7 '13 at 16:45
    
@HristoValkanov here is my php code...$rs=mysql_query("insert into _{$pid}_item values ('$pid','$item_brand','$item_code','$item_name','$item_quantity','$item_mrp','$i‌​tem_discount','$item_vat','$item_sat','$item_selling_price','$item_rating','$item‌​_image')"); I am passing the values to these variables.. –  Rahul Rastogi Aug 7 '13 at 16:48
    
If you're able to edit your post (not sure if your reputation is too low), please do so and put your code in there:it is unreadible in the comments. –  sh1ftst0rm Aug 7 '13 at 16:52
    
You should use mysqli php.net/manual/en/book.mysqli.php or PDO php.net/manual/en/book.pdo.php –  Logan Murphy Aug 7 '13 at 16:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try something like mysql_real_escape_string, or if using PDO, use PDO::quote.

And please please please read up on SQL injection attacks. It is not just a matter of getting failed queries, it is a matter of having an attacker get access to your entire database, like all other user's information.

Even better is to use prepared statements. This would look something like this:

<?php
//Use of $pid in the table name is strange here (see comments section) and is
// dangerous unless you're generating it yourself entirely from known information
// sources. Otherwise you definitely need to sanitize it, which I don't think
// prepared statements or quoting can do.
$stmt = $dbh->prepare("
    INSERT INTO 
        :_{$pid}_item
    VALUES (
        :pid,
        :item_brand,
        :item_code,
        :item_name,
        :item_quantity,
        :item_mrp,
        :i‌tem_discount,
        :item_vat,
        :item_sat,
        :item_selling_price,
        :item_rating,
        :item‌​_image)
"); 

$stmt->bindParam(":pid", $pid);
$stmt->bindParam(":item_brand", $item_brand);
$stmt->bindParam(":item_code", $item_code);
//... etc ...
$stmt->execute();

?>
share|improve this answer
    
Using $pid in the table name seems like pretty strange database architecture. Do you have separate identical tables for each possible vlaue of pid? Why not put them all in one table, since you have pid stored in the row anyway. This also means you don't need to worry about sanitizing the table name. –  sh1ftst0rm Aug 7 '13 at 17:05

The best complete explanation about your problem can be found here.

As you probably noticed, if someone is able to input anything and crash your system, your code is not correctly implemented.

In the article above is explained the best way to avoid this happening. Have a nice time reading the explanations and choosing the method that most fits your case. :)

share|improve this answer

Sometimes you need to check your header.

This doesn't accept apostrophe:

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />

For you to work well with apostrophe, it's good if you'll just be using this in your header:

<meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1"/>
share|improve this answer
    $query = str_replace("\'","''", $query);
    $query = stripslashes($query);

I have been using these two babies for similar situation. I haven't heard a complain yet. Give it a try. Or play with it.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course not, why would hackers complain after they got a dump of your database =). This is not secure enough against SQL injection attacks. On the PHP documentation page for addslashes(): "To escape database parameters, DBMS specific escape function (e.g. mysqli_real_escape_string() for MySQL or pg_escape_literal(), pg_escape_string() for PostgreSQL) should be used for security reasons" –  sh1ftst0rm Aug 7 '13 at 16:57
    
Ohh my .. Thank you –  Rabin Aug 7 '13 at 17:00
    
@sh1ftst0rm thnks.. –  Rahul Rastogi Aug 7 '13 at 17:34
    
@user2155922: If you're satisfied with the answer I provided above, feel free to click the check mark image next to it to mark it as the accepted answer. –  sh1ftst0rm Aug 7 '13 at 17:44

Use addslashes() php function.

http://php.net/manual/en/function.addslashes.php

It is not as time consuming as you may think. Unnoticeable.

share|improve this answer
    
This is not secure enough for SQL queries. From the page you linked: "To escape database parameters, DBMS specific escape function (e.g. mysqli_real_escape_string() for MySQL or pg_escape_literal(), pg_escape_string() for PostgreSQL) should be used for security reasons" –  sh1ftst0rm Aug 7 '13 at 16:55

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