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I have something like the following source code in c:

char *get_str() {
    char *str; 
    int slen=get_strlen();
    str=(char *)malloc(sizeof(char)*slen);
    set_str(str);
    printf("returning str %s with len %d\n", str, strlen(str));
    return str;
}

int main() {
    char *str=get_str();
    printf("recieved str %s with len %d\n", str, strlen(str));
}

And I get the following output:

returning str hi with len 2
received str with len 0

This is driving me nuts. The "returning str" statement has exactly what it should, but the "received str" keeps coming back null. I have verified that slen is non-zero. The function that sets the string is part of a large and widely used software package, so can be assumed to set the string correctly.

EDIT:

As pointed out below, the information presented here wasn't sufficient to solve the problem. I also needed to point out that the the function get_str was in a different source code file. The problem ended up being that I forgot to add a line for get_str() to the header, which alk and Nitzan Shaked correctly guessed below. This did not result in a compile error because I am using an ansi c compiler, which just assumed that get_str would return an integer.

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2  
Please show set_str –  dasblinkenlight Aug 7 '13 at 18:04
2  
Are main() and get_str() defined in the same compilation unit? Could it be that char means one thing where get_str() is defined, and another where main() is defined (say a wide-char, and that's why the presumed length is 0?) –  Nitzan Shaked Aug 7 '13 at 18:05
1  
Don't forget to allocate an extra spot for null terminator. –  dasblinkenlight Aug 7 '13 at 18:05
1  
So we are to assume that get_strlen() returns a proper size of 3 (to include the terminator), that the unchecked and improperly cast malloc() is not failing, and that set_str() properly copies the same string used for calculation in get_strlen()? Just for kicks and giggles, try putting get_strlen() into that printf() rather than strlen(str) to see what was actually allocated if anything. –  WhozCraig Aug 7 '13 at 18:16
1  
"I have something like the following source code ..." -- We can't help you with your actual code unless you show it to us. In modifying your code for posting, you've probably removed whatever causes the problem you're seeing; after all, you don't know what causes it. Show us actual compilable runnable source code that exhibits the problem you're seeing. sscce.org –  Keith Thompson Aug 7 '13 at 18:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I bet this runs on a 64bit system and your code looks like this:

int main() {
    char *str=get_str();
    printf("received str %s with len %d\n", str, strlen(str));
}

char *get_str() {
    char *str; 
    int slen=get_strlen();
    str=(char *)malloc(sizeof(char)*slen);
    set_str(str);
    printf("returning str %s with len %d\n", str, strlen(str));
    return str;
}

To fix this, add the appropriate prototyping:

char *get_str();

before the function's first usage.


On (most?) 32bit systems pointer are 32bit wide, which is the same size as an int to which the compiler defaults the function as the prototpye is missing, so although using a wrong type the value gets pass back up successfully. The latter won't work anymore on a 64bit system as pointers (on most systems) are wider than an int.

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