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I've got a website that's using a few different 'main' colors. The general HTML layout stays the same, only the colors change depending on the content.

I was wondering if I could set a color variable depending on a CSS-class. This way I can theme my website with a few variables and let SASS fill in the colors.

For example:

$color-1: #444;
$color-2: #555;
$color-3: #666;
$color-4: #777;

body.class-1 {
  color-default: $color-1;
  color-main: $color-2;
}
body.class-2 {
  color-default: $color-3;
  color-main: $color-4;
}

/* content css */
.content {
  background: $color-default;
  color: $color-main;
}

I was thinking of using a mixin for this, but I was wondering if there's a better way to do this, with a function maybe? I'm not that great with SASS, so if anyone could help me out. Appreciated.

Thanks.

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However you do this, I know variables aren't the answer. Variables are set at compile-time, when the Sass is being turned into CSS. Thus, all your .content will have the same colors if they have a variable as the value. –  Rory O'Kane Aug 7 '13 at 19:37
    
So if I have 3 colors, my final .css file will have the same css markup three times (one for each color) with just a few differences? (body class and HEX color values) –  JrnDel Aug 7 '13 at 19:43
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think a mixin is the answer. (As I wrote, variables won’t work.)

@mixin content($color-default, $color-main) {
  background: $color-default;
  color: $color-main;
}

body.class-1 {
  @include content(#444, #555);
}

body.class-2 {
  @include content(#666, #777);
}

That SCSS compiles to this CSS:

body.class-1 {
  background: #444444;
  color: #555555; }

body.class-2 {
  background: #666666;
  color: #777777; }

If you wanted to group the color values together in your SCSS file, you could use variables in conjunction with the mixin:

$color-1: #444;
$color-2: #555;
$color-3: #666;
$color-4: #777;

body.class-1 {
  @include content($color-1, $color-2);
}

body.class-2 {
  @include content($color-3, $color-4);
}
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Allright, I was afraid I had to do it like this. Thanks for the help, appreciated. –  JrnDel Aug 7 '13 at 20:10
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If you really want to get hacky you could also define your different color schemes in a single variable like $scheme1: class1 #333 #444, where the first value is always the name, and that is followed by all the colors in that scheme.

You can then use @each:

// Define your schemes with a name and colors
$scheme1: class1 #444 #555;
$scheme2: class2 #666 #777;
$scheme3: class4 #888 #999;

// Here are your color schemes
$schemes: $scheme1 $scheme2 $scheme3;

@each $scheme in $schemes {
  // Here are the rules specific to the colors in the theme
  body.#{nth($scheme, 1)} .content {
    background-color: nth($scheme, 2);
    color: nth($scheme, 3);
  }
}

This will compile to:

body.class1 .content {
  background-color: #444444;
  color: #555555; }

body.class2 .content {
  background-color: #666666;
  color: #777777; }

body.class4 .content {
  background-color: #888888;
  color: #999999; }

Obviously if you don't want to combine body.class1 and .content in your selectors, you could just specify a mixin content($main, $default) and call it inside the @each using nth just like in the above code, but the point is you don't have to write out a rule for each of your classes.

EDIT There are lots of interesting answers on SASS make dynamic variable by connecting string and $var and Merge string and variable to a variable with SASS.

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Thanks for your answer and the links, both very intresting read. Appreciated. –  JrnDel Aug 9 '13 at 7:53
    
Thank you very much. I had the daunting task of applying eight different colour schemes to the same page, and has saved me a lot of time. Hacky, but it works. Cheers –  iamdash Feb 19 at 23:20
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If you don't want to use a variable for each color, you can use one variable for all kinds of colors. In the mixin you can choose the right color with nth. For instance, if you write the index of the color as 1, then you get the first color in the color variable.

$colors: #444, #555, #666, #777;

@mixin content($color-default-num, $color-main-num) {
  background: nth($colors, $color-default-num);
  color: nth($colors, $color-main-num);
}

body.class-1 {
  @include content(1, 2);
}
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1  
What developer is going to remember what order their colors are in? This is an extremely impractical solution. –  cimmanon Aug 8 '13 at 11:33
    
@cimmanon Right. But if you think forward you can now use a for-loop to create classes for each color :) I wanted to show only one way which is possible –  timhartmann Feb 14 at 7:19
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