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I have a property that is set to "DateTime?" like this:

Public Overridable Property MyDateTime As DateTime?

I'm trying to get the hours and minutes without the seconds and without AM or PM.

I tried this:

MyDateTime.Value.TimeOfDay.ToString

That gives me the hours, minutes, and seconds without AM or PM

And I tried this:

MyDateTime.Value.ToShortTimeString

This gives me only the hours and minutes, but also gives me AM or PM.

Is there a way to format it so it looks like this?

9:10

or

2:40

Thanks

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2  
Please, try ToString("hh:mm"). You can change to HH if you would like 2pm to be 14 –  Andre Calil Aug 7 '13 at 19:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are looking for a custom Date and Time format.

Try this:

MyDateTime.Value.ToString("HH:mm")
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this gets rid of the seconds and AM/PM but it puts it in 24 hour time format. Anyway to stick with 12 hour times? thanks –  999cm999 Aug 7 '13 at 19:50
    
@999cm999 change the HH to hh. See the MSDN link for more information on custom formatters. Additionally, use a single H (upper or lower case for 24 hour time) if you don't want a leading zero, like 9 instead of 09. –  vcsjones Aug 7 '13 at 19:51

The ToString method accepts formatting parameters.

E.g. (12 hour clock)

MyDateTime.Value.ToString("h:mm")

(24 hour clock)

MyDateTime.Value.ToString("H:mm")
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1  
Semicolons shouldn't be used for VB.NET. –  vcsjones Aug 7 '13 at 19:46
    
TimeOfDay isn't strictly necessary since you are outputting to a string. –  Guvante Aug 7 '13 at 19:47
    
Noted, and changed. Good eye :) –  Khan Aug 7 '13 at 19:48
1  
@Guvante - Not just unnecessary, but would cause an exception! –  Mike Christensen Aug 7 '13 at 19:58

Try:

MyDateTime.Value.ToString("h:mm") ' 12 Hour Clock

Or:

MyDateTime.Value.ToString("H:mm") ' 24 Hour Clock
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1  
He is looking for the short form (9:24) not the long form (09:24). –  Guvante Aug 7 '13 at 19:48
    
@Guvante - Good catch. h or H for single digits, hh or HH for leading zero. –  Mike Christensen Aug 7 '13 at 19:49
MyDateTime.Value.ToString("hh:mm tt")

This Code show time with AM or PM

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