Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
r = {}
r[0] = [1, 2]
r[2] = [1, 2, 4]
r[4] = [1, 2, 5]
r[6] = [1, 2]

count = 0
r.each do |x|
    count += x.length
end 

puts count #output is 8 expected value is 10
  1. Why this behavior?
  2. How to achieve the expected behavior (getting the sum of the length)
share|improve this question
    
I've achieved the expected behavior by iterating on value rather than on the hash itself. But explanation are still welcomed. –  AsTeR Aug 7 '13 at 19:45
    
Try puts x inside the loop and see what you have –  Gareth Aug 7 '13 at 19:49
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

each converts the receiver hash into an array and iterates over it. Each element of that iteration consists of an array of two elements: a key and its corresponding value. Since you have four key-value pairs, that adds up to eight.

To acheive 10, you can do:

r.each do |x|
  count += x.last.length
end

or

r.each do |_, v|
  count += v.length
end

or

r.values.flatten.length
share|improve this answer
1  
The last one looks more elegant, but will have the side-effect of having to process a lot of data for large lists and create a temporary array that's thrown away almost immediately. The best combination of these is: r.values.inject(0) { |s, v| s + v.length } or if you have ActiveSupport: r.values.sum(&:length). –  tadman Aug 7 '13 at 23:58
add comment

Try the below:

r = {}
r[0] = [1, 2]
r[2] = [1, 2, 4]
r[4] = [1, 2, 5]
r[6] = [1, 2]
count = 0
r.each do |k,v|
    count += v.length
end 

puts count
# >> 10

Hash#each says

Calls block once for each key in hsh, passing the key-value pair as parameters.

In your case:

r = {}
r[0] = [1, 2]
r[2] = [1, 2, 4]
r[4] = [1, 2, 5]
r[6] = [1, 2]
count = 0
r.each do |x|
    p x.length,x
end 

# >> 2
# >> [0, [1, 2]]
# >> 2
# >> [2, [1, 2, 4]]
# >> 2
# >> [4, [1, 2, 5]]
# >> 2
# >> [6, [1, 2]]

Your each x is a size of 2 array. Now as you your Hash r has 4 keys, thus 4*2 gives the total count of 8.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is because each on a Hash will iterate over pairs, so 4 * 2 = 8. Expanding them here as k,v fixes the issue. –  tadman Aug 7 '13 at 19:48
    
@tadman exactly true...your one line is the exact and complete answer. –  Arup Rakshit Aug 7 '13 at 19:58
    
You replied first and your answer is correct (+1), nevertheless I found the one from @sawa simpler. Thanks however –  AsTeR Aug 7 '13 at 20:08
add comment

r is a hash, not an array, so #each gives the key and the value to the block. Since the block only takes a single argument, the argument is given as an array.

r = {}
r[0] = [1,2,3]

r.each do |x|
  p x #=> [0,[1,2,3]]
end

r.each do |key,value|
  p key #=> 0
  p value #=> [1,2]
end
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.