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Starting multiple threads and having each exec() then destroy() a running java process result in some of the process not being destroyed and still running after program exit. Here is some code that reproduce the issue. I noticed the more threads you start, the more processes stay alive. And the more sleep before destroy(), the less processes stay alive. (I used InfiniteLoop as an example. Any running process will do the trick.)

EDIT : Bug has been reported to Oracle, waiting for an answer. Feel free to share any knowledge/experiments on the subject.

for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
  new Thread(new Runnable()
  {
    public void run()
    {
      try
      {
        Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(new String[]{"java", "InfiniteLoop"});
        Thread.sleep(1);
        p.destroy();
      }catch(IOException | InterruptedException e){e.printStackTrace();}                    
    }
  }).start();
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you getting exceptions? – SLaks Aug 7 '13 at 21:16
    
There is no exception. – BastienBodart Aug 7 '13 at 21:18
    
How do you know? – SLaks Aug 7 '13 at 21:18
    
e.printStackTrace() in the catch block does nothing during execution. – BastienBodart Aug 7 '13 at 21:20
    
Are you waiting for the threads to terminate before exiting? Are you spawning them from a daemon thread (if so then perhaps the JVM is terminating them inside their sleep() call when your program exits)? – Jason C Aug 7 '13 at 21:22

If subprocesses write anything to stdout or stderr (intentionally or not), that could cause trouble:

"Because some native platforms only provide limited buffer size for standard input and output streams, failure to promptly write the input stream or read the output stream of the subprocess may cause the subprocess to block, and even deadlock."

Source: http://www.javaworld.com/jw-12-2000/jw-1229-traps.html

The whole article is IMO worth reading if you need to use Runtime.exec().

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't write anything, it's just an empty while(true){} – BastienBodart Aug 7 '13 at 23:10

Use a p.waitFor(); before p.destroy(); ,

this will ensure the completion of the previous process. I think you p.destroy command gets invoked sooner than the exec() command performs the action. Therefore it becomes useless.

share|improve this answer
1  
p.waitFor() waits for the process to terminate, so in the case of the InfiniteLoop, it would never return. The exec() point -- I wonder; I can find nothing in the documentation that guarantees that the process has actually been started when exec() returns, although I assume it has been because it has the ability to e.g. throw errors when the command isn't found. – Jason C Aug 15 '13 at 17:47
    
doesnt it wait for the current process to return? and then p.destroy kills the process..it completes one creation and destruction cycle in one iteration.. – Abhishek Aug 15 '13 at 17:47
    
p.waitFor() waits for exec() to return, therefore using this as a marker..you may check whethr exec() works or not.. – Abhishek Aug 15 '13 at 17:50
    

This is simply because before the threads execute the destroy call, your main program terminates and all the associated threads leaving the started processes running. To verify this, simply add a System.out call after the destroy and you will find it is not executed. To overcome this add a Thread.sleep at the end of your main method and you will not have the orphaned processes. The below does not leave any process running.

public class ProcessTest {

public static final void main (String[] args) throws Exception {

    for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        new Thread(new Runnable()
            {
                public void run() {
                    try {
                        Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(new String[]{"java", "InfiniteLoop"});
                        Thread.sleep(1);
                        p.destroy();
                        System.out.println("Destroyed");
                    }catch(IOException e) {
                        System.err.println("exception: " + e.getMessage());
                    } catch(InterruptedException e){
                        System.err.println("exception: " + e.getMessage());
                    }
                }
            }).start();
    }


    Thread.sleep(1000);

}

}

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't resolve the issue; that's actually one of the first tests I ran too. I had a 10 second sleep, and during that time, a handful of the processes remained running during the entire sleep even though they should've been destroyed (and didn't terminate when the program terminated either). – Jason C Aug 19 '13 at 13:54
    
I am running the above code in Debian and it has no processes left after adding Thread.sleep(). What I have done above is not the correct way to wait for threads to stop. You will have to call Thread.join on each of the threads created in a loop at the end. Have you tried this and is it still the same problem? – Raji Aug 20 '13 at 3:51
    
Tried your code, problem remains. But I don't see your point, the problem does not come from the threads but from the processes. A terminating thread does not terminate the processes it launched. – BastienBodart Aug 20 '13 at 7:50
    
Agreed, the started processes are not terminating. But there are two reasons for not terminating, it is not terminating because destroy is not called or destroy itself has a bug. To eliminate the first, I suggested that you join the main thread with the started threads, so you are sure that the threads have terminated which eliminates that scenario. Calling "sleep" method does not eliminate any scenario. – Raji Aug 21 '13 at 4:56
1  
Further researching shows the following results: on Debian "jre build 1.7.0-b147" / "jdk build 1.6.0_31-b04" and on windows 7 32-bit "java build 1.6.0_31-b04", the processes are getting terminated correctly. But on a windows 7 64-bit using a jdk build 1.7.0-b147, the processes are not getting terminated even if destroy is called. – Raji Aug 21 '13 at 14:00

You should close the input/output/error streams to the process. we saw some issues in the past where the forked process was not completing properly due to those streams not being closed (even if they weren't being used).

share|improve this answer
    
Already tried, doesn't solve it. – BastienBodart Aug 20 '13 at 7:41
    
This shouldn't be necessary, if you look e.g. at the implementation of UnixProcess#destroy(), it closes all the streams automatically. – Mifeet Aug 16 '15 at 12:41
    
@Mifeet - this question was answered 2 years ago. are you looking at a production version of java from two years ago? (and this experience may be from early jdk 6 or even 5, tough to keep them all straight at this point in time). – jtahlborn Aug 16 '15 at 18:51
    
Right, I was looking at JDK 7 to be precise. – Mifeet Aug 17 '15 at 7:48

I believe that according to link, a distinct process is spawned by the operating system in response to this call. This process has a lifetime independent of your Java program and threads within it so you would expect it to continue running after your program has exited. I just tried it on my machine and it appeared to work as expected:

import java.io.*;

class Mp {
public static void main(String []args) {
    for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                try {
                    System.out.println("1");
                    Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec
                        (new String[]{"notepad", ""});
                    System.out.println("2");
                    Thread.sleep(5);
                    System.out.println("3");
                    p.destroy();
                    System.out.println("4");
                }
                catch(IOException | InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }                    
            }
        }).start();
    }
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but his code is killing the all of the processes. – SLaks Aug 7 '13 at 21:19
    
Good point - I forgot about the destroy call. It would be useful to add a e.printStackTrace() to the exception block to see if any errors are occurring. – Ali B Aug 7 '13 at 21:21
    
It would also be useful to add some println traces to the threads to see if destroy() is actually getting reached. – Jason C Aug 7 '13 at 21:24
    
I tried it out on my machine just now as follows with no luck - I wonder if the JVM instance on the OP's machine has an issue. – Ali B Aug 7 '13 at 21:30
    
@AliB Could you try with an infinite-loop process? I only experience the issue with actually running processes. – BastienBodart Aug 7 '13 at 23:26

This is not an answer; I am posting complete source for my own attempt at recreating this problem as per discussion in question comments.

I cannot reproduce this problem on Ubuntu 12.04; OpenJDK 6b_27 (however, see below).

ProcessTest.java:

import java.io.*;

public class ProcessTest {

    public static final void main (String[] args) throws Exception {

        for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            new Thread(new Runnable() 
                {
                    public void run() {
                        try {
                            Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(new String[]{"java", "InfiniteLoop"});
                            Thread.sleep(1);
                            p.destroy();
                        }catch(IOException e) {
                            System.err.println("exception: " + e.getMessage());
                        } catch(InterruptedException e){
                            System.err.println("exception: " + e.getMessage());
                        }                    
                    }
                }).start();
        }

    }

}

InfiniteLoop.java

public class InfiniteLoop {
    public static final void main (String[] args) {
        while (true) ;
    }
}

I cannot reproduce the issue where processes remaining running after the JVM terminates. However, if I add a long delay in the main thread after starting the threads but before returning from main, I do see roughly a dozen running java processes that stick around (although they are terminated when the main program terminates).

Update:

I just had it leave about 5 processes running after it terminated. It doesn't always happen. Weird. I want to know more about this too. I have a hunch that it has something to do with destroying the process too quickly or some kind of race condition; maybe java forks something off or does something to create a new process that destroy() doesn't take care of if called too quickly / at the wrong time.

I found an old bug (but it is not mark resolved) stating that if a process spawns subprocesses they may not be killed by destroy(). bugs.sun.com/bugdatabase/view_bug.do?bug_id=4770092 What version of the JDK are you using.

Here's another reference to what looks like a similar issue: Java tool/method to force-kill a child process And I want to apologize if I've only added confusion to your life, I don't actually use Process that much and am not familiar with the quirks. Hopefully somebody else will step in with a definitive answer. It seems like it doesn't handle subprocesses well, and I'm presuming java forks something off. That's all I got.

share|improve this answer
    
I still experience the issue with this code. I tried on a different machine with Fedora, same problem. But I tried on a Windows 7 64 in virtual box and there was no problem! Is it OS related then? – BastienBodart Aug 8 '13 at 1:59
    
Ubuntu doesn't work, check out the comments I left in your question. I'm running into the same issue, randomly. – Jason C Aug 8 '13 at 2:00
    
Why not edit this into the question rather than posting it as an answer? – DannyMo Aug 13 '13 at 20:44
    
I needed a place to post my test code when I was going back and forth with the OP. I don't feel it is appropriate to edit it into somebody else's question. I will remove this once it is resolved. I agree it is not ideal but SO does not lend itself well to these types of discussions. :) – Jason C Aug 13 '13 at 23:09
    
try adding p.getOutputStream().close(); p.getInputStream().close(); p.getErrorStream().close(); before the destroy call. – jtahlborn Aug 19 '13 at 12:23

There is a race condition between the time Runtime.exec kicks off a new thread to start a Process and when you tell that process to destroy itself.

I'm on a linux machine so I will use the UNIXProcess.class file to illustrate.

Runtime.exec(...) will create a new ProcessBuilder and start it which on a unix machine creates a new UNIXProcess instance. In the constructor of UNIXProcess there is this block of code which actually executes the process in a background (forked) thread:

java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(
            new java.security.PrivilegedAction() {
    public Object run() {
    Thread t = new Thread("process reaper") {
        public void run() {
                    try {
                        pid = forkAndExec(prog,
                      argBlock, argc,
                      envBlock, envc,
                      dir,
                      redirectErrorStream,
                      stdin_fd, stdout_fd, stderr_fd);
                    } catch (IOException e) {
                        gate.setException(e); /*remember to rethrow later*/
                        gate.exit();
                        return;
                    }
                    java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(
                    new java.security.PrivilegedAction() {
                        public Object run() {
                        stdin_stream = new BufferedOutputStream(new
                                                FileOutputStream(stdin_fd));
                        stdout_stream = new BufferedInputStream(new
                                                FileInputStream(stdout_fd));
                        stderr_stream = new FileInputStream(stderr_fd);
                        return null;
                    }
                    });
                    gate.exit(); /* exit from constructor */
        int res = waitForProcessExit(pid);
        synchronized (UNIXProcess.this) {
            hasExited = true;
            exitcode = res;
            UNIXProcess.this.notifyAll();
        }
        }
    };
            t.setDaemon(true);
            t.start();
    return null;
    }
});

Notice that the background thread sets the field pid which is the UNIX process id. This will be used by destroy() to tell the OS which process to kill.

Because there is no way to make sure that this background thread has run when destroy() is called, we may try to kill the process before it has run OR we may try to kill the process before pid field has been set; pid is uninitialized and therefore is 0. So I think calling destroy too early will do the equivalent of a kill -9 0

There is even a comment in the UNIXProcess destroy() that alludes to this but only considers calling destroy after the process has already finished, not before it has started:

// There is a risk that pid will be recycled, causing us to
// kill the wrong process!  So we only terminate processes
// that appear to still be running.  Even with this check,
// there is an unavoidable race condition here, but the window
// is very small, and OSes try hard to not recycle pids too
// soon, so this is quite safe.

The pid field is not even marked as volatile so we may not even see the most recent value all the time.

share|improve this answer
3  
This race condition doesn't exist here. The UNIXProcess constructor doesn't return until after the forkAndExec call in the thread completes -- that's what gate is for. In fact, that's how it is able to throw an exception if the process fails to start, you'll note that exception originates from that background thread. So the constructor will not return until the process is started, and therefore it is not possible to call destroy() before the process is started. – Jason C Aug 15 '13 at 20:46
1  
The comment you see in destroy() is referring to a different scenario. That comment refers to the fact that if a process dies on its own, the OS may reuse its PID for some other new process, so by the time our application calls destroy(), the PID may be a different unrelated process that we don't want to kill. The code near that comment just says "if the process already exited on its own, don't kill it", which is an attempt (not 100% reliable, as noted) to avoid killing the wrong thing. – Jason C Aug 15 '13 at 20:50

I had a very similar issue and the problem with destroy() not working was manifesting even with a single thread.

Process process = processBuilder(ForeverRunningMain.class).start()
long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis() + TIMEOUT_MS; 
while (System.currentTimeMillis() < endTime) {
    sleep(50);
}
process.destroy();

The process was not always destroyed if TIMEOUT_MS was too low. Adding an additional sleep() before destroy() fixed it (even though I don't have an explanation why):

Thread.sleep(300);
process.destroy();
share|improve this answer

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