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I'm not really used to design pattern generally, and I never used Decorator. I want an object which can have different behaviour according to the context. These behaviours are defined in different classes. I guess Decorator does the trick. But I need that each decorator can access to the same properties, and call children methods first, like with inheritance. So here what I've done:

abstract class Component{

    /**
     * Used to access last chain Decorator
     *
     * @var Decorator
     */
    protected $this;

    protected $prop1;//These properies have to be accessed in any decorators

    protected $prop2;

    protected $prop3;

    //this method is used to share properties with the childrens
    public function getAttributesReferencesArray() {
        $attributes=[];
        foreach($this as $attr=>&$val)
                $attributes[$attr]=&$val;
        return $attributes;
    }

}

class Foo extends Component{

    public function __construct() {
        $this->prop1="initialized";
        //...
    }

    public function method1() {//this method can be "overrided" and called here
        //...
    }

    public function method2() {//this method call the overrided or not method1
        //...
        $this->this->method1();
        //...
    }

}

abstract class Decorator extends Component{

    /**
     * Used to access parent component
     *
     * @var Component
     */
    protected $parent;

    public function __construct(Component $parent) {
        $attributes=$parent->getAttributesReferencesArray();
        foreach($attributes as $attr=>&$val)
                $this->{$attr}=&$val;
        $this->parent=$parent;
        $this->this=$this;
    }

    public function __call($method, $args) {
        if(!$this->parent instanceof Decorator &&
            !method_exists($this->parent, $method))
                throw new Exception("Undefined method $method attempt.");
        return call_user_func_array(array($this->parent, $method), $args);
    }

}

class Bar extends Decorator{

    //this method call the component method (I guess Decorator classical way)
    public function method1(){
        //...
        $this->parent->method1();
        $this->prop2="set in Bar";
    }
}

class Baz extends Decorator{

    public function method2(){//this method call the overrided or not method1
        //...
        $this->this->method1();
        //...
    }

}

Now we can "construct" the "inheritance" according to the context:

//...
$obj=new Foo();
if($context->useBar())
        $obj=new Bar($obj);
if($context->somethingElse())
        $obj=new Baz($obj);

and run the object with abstraction of behaviour:

$obj->method1();
//...

It does what I want, but:

  • there isn't anymore encapsulation
  • $this->parent is ugly
  • $this->this is ugly

What do you think about that?

  • How can I access decorator ("children") method another way
  • How can I share properties like if they where protected in an inherited context
  • Is it a bad usage of Decorator?
  • Is there some more elegant pattern that does the trick
  • parent and this attributes are a kind of reinventing the wheel isn't it?

A real world example: the coffee machine

abstract class CoffeeFactory{// Component

    /**
     * Used to access last chain Decorator
     *
     * @var Decorator
     */
    protected $this;

    /**
     * Used to access user choices
     *
     * @var CoffeeMachine
     */
    protected $coffeeMachine;

    protected $water;//the water quantity in cl

    protected $coffeePowder;

    protected $isSpoon=FALSE;

    protected $cup=[];

    //this method is used to share properties with the childrens
    public function getAttributesReferencesArray() {
        $attributes=[];
        foreach($this as $attr=>&$val)
                $attributes[$attr]=&$val;
        return $attributes;
    }

}

class SimpleCoffeeFactory extends CoffeeFactory{//Foo

    public function __construct(CoffeeMachine $coffeeMachine) {
        $this->coffeeMachine=$coffeeMachine;
        $this->water=$coffeeMachine->isEspresso()?10:20;
        $this->coffeePowder=$coffeeMachine->isDouble()?2:1;
        $this->water-=$this->coffeePowder;
        $this->this=$this;
    }

    private function addCoffeePowder(){
        $this->cup["coffeePowder"]=$this->coffeePowder;
    }

    private function addSpoon(){
        if($this->isSpoon)
                $this->cup["spoon"]=1;
    }

    public function isWaterHot($boilingWater){
        return $this->getWaterTemperature($boilingWater)>90;
    }

    private function addWater() {
        $boilingWater=$this->getWaterForBoiling($this->water);
        while(!$this->this->isWaterHot($boilingWater))
                $this->boilWater($boilingWater);
        $this->cup["water"]=$boilingWater;
    }

    public function prepare() {
        $this->addCoffeePowder();
        $this->addSpoon();
    }

    public function getCup() {
        $this->this->prepare();
        $this->addWater();
        return $this->cup;
    }

}

abstract class Decorator extends CoffeeFactory{

    /**
     * Used to access parent component
     *
     * @var Component
     */
    protected $parent;

    public function __construct(Component $parent) {
        $attributes=$parent->getAttributesReferencesArray();
        foreach($attributes as $attr=>&$val)
                $this->{$attr}=&$val;
        $this->parent=$parent;
        $this->this=$this;
    }

    public function __call($method, $args) {
        if(!$this->parent instanceof Decorator &&
            !method_exists($this->parent, $method))
                throw new Exception("Undefined method $method attempt.");
        return call_user_func_array(array($this->parent, $method), $args);
    }
}

class SugarCoffeeFactory extends Decorator{

    protected $sugar;

    public function __construct(Component $parent) {
        parent::__construct($parent);
        $this->sugar=$this->coffeeMachine->howMuchSugar();
        $this->water-=$this->sugar;
        $this->isSpoon=TRUE;
    }

    public function prepare() {
        $this->cup['sugar']=$this->sugar;
        $this->parent->prepare();
    }
}

class MilkCoffeeFactory extends Decorator{

    protected $milk;

    public function __construct(Component $parent) {
        parent::__construct($parent);
        $this->milk=$this->coffeeMachine->howMuchMilk();
        $this->water-=$this->milk;
    }

    public function prepare() {
        $this->parent->prepare();
        $this->cup['milk']=$this->milk;
    }

    public function isWaterHot($boilingWater){
        //The milk is added cold, so the more milk we have, the hotter water have to be.
        return $this->getWaterTemperature($boilingWater)>90+$this->milk;
    }

}

//Now we can "construct" the "inheritance" according to the coffee machine:

//...
$coffeeFactory=new SimpleCoffeeFactory($coffeeMachine);
if($coffeeMachine->wantSugar())
        $coffeeFactory=new SugarCoffeeFactory($coffeeFactory);
if($coffeeMachine->wantMilk())
        $coffeeFactory=new MilkCoffeeFactory($coffeeFactory);

//and get our cup with abstraction of behaviour:

$cupOfCoffee=$coffeeFactory->getCup();
//...
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

The Decorator pattern is not made to do internal changes in the base class (you call this one parent). What you are doing is bad usage of this pattern. The Decorators should only change the output of the functions instead of playing with variables.

One solution is to define getters and setters for your protected variables and to call them from the Decorator.

Another solution is what I prefer personally and that is splitting the behaviour which is dependent on the context and the base class:

class Component {
    protected $behaviour;
    function __construct() {
        $this->behaviour = new StandardBehaviour();
    }

    function method1() {
        $this->prop2 = $this->behaviour->getProp2Value();
    }
    function setBehaviour(Behaviour $behaviour) {
        $this->behaviour = $behaviour;
    }
}

abstract class Behaviour {
    abstract function getProp2Value();
}

class StandardBehaviour extends Behaviour {
    function getProp2Value() {
        return 'set by bahaviour ';
    }
}

class BarBehaviour extends StandardBehaviour {
    function getProp2Value() {
        return parent::getProp2Value().' Bar';
    }
}

class BazBehaviour extends BarBehaviour {
    function getProp2Value() {
        return 'set in Baz';
    }
}

Now we can use it like this:

$obj=new Foo();
if($context->useBar())
    $obj->setBehaviour(new BarBehaviour);
if($context->somethingElse())
    $obj->setBehaviour(new BazBehaviour);

I hope this answers your question!

EDIT after comments

I see your point that the behaviours replace each other instead of chaining. This is indeed a typical problem for the decorator class. However you really shouldn't change the original class in a decorator class. A decorator class only 'decorates' output of the original. Below a typical example of how the decorator pattern would be used in the real world scenario you mentioned:

interface ICoffeeFactory {
    public function produceCoffee();
}

class SimpleCoffeeFactory implements ICoffeeFactory{
    protected $water;//the water quantity in cl

    public function __construct() {
        $this->water=20;
    }

    protected function addCoffeePowder($cup){
        $cup["coffeePowder"]=1;
        return $cup;
    }

    protected function addWater($cup) {
        $cup["water"]=$this->water;
        return $cup;
    }

    public function produceCoffee() {
        $cup = array();
        $cup = $this->addCoffeePowder($cup);
        $cup = $this->addSpoon($cup);
        $cup = $this->addWater($cup);
        return $cup;
    }

}

class EspressoCoffeeFactory extends SimpleCoffeeFactory {
    public function __construct() {
        $this->water=5;
    }

    protected function addCoffeePowder($cup){
        $cup["coffeePowder"]=3;
        return $cup;
    }
}

abstract class Decorator implements ICoffeeFactory {
    function __construct(ICoffeeFactory $machine)
}

class SugarCoffee extends Decorator{
    public function produceCoffee() {
        $cup = $this->factory->produceCoffee();
        if ($cup['water'] > 0)
            $cup['water'] -= 1;

        $cup['spoon']  = TRUE;
        $cup['sugar'] += 1;
        return $cup;
    }
}

class MilkCoffee extends Decorator{
    protected function produceCoffee() {
        $cup = $this->factory->produceCoffee();
        $cup['milk'] = 5;
        return $cup;
    }
}

//Now we can "construct" the "inheritance" according to the coffee machine:

//...
$coffee=new SimpleCoffeeFactory();
if($coffeeMachine->wantSugar())
        $coffee=new SugarCoffee($coffee);
if($coffeeMachine->wantMilk())
        $coffee=new MilkCoffee($coffee);

//and get our cup with abstraction of behaviour:

$cupOfCoffee=$coffee->produceCoffee();
//...
share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer ! Mohamed, I see that you're a good engineer, and that you know what you're talking about. I'll try to do a response of the same quality. First off all, your code doesn't work as excepted. When the BazBehaviour is added, $obj forgot the BarBehaviour, which is not what I want. If the context said that Bar need to be used, it need to be even if “somethingElse()”, and that BazBehaviour need to be used too. –  Pierre Nov 13 '13 at 11:11
    
It depends on the getProp2Value() implementation but for exemple, I need that $obj->getProp2Value() can output something like “Set in standard, modified in Bar, modified in Baz” if useBar() and somethingElse(). If useBar() is false but somethingElse() is true: “Set in standard, modified in Baz”. It's maybe not easy to see that with an abstract fooBar example, I'll add a concrete one. After that, I'll comment what you said: “What I'm doing is not a good usage of decorator, I don't respect the encapsulation principle, I should use getter and setter”. –  Pierre Nov 13 '13 at 11:12
    
I will not debate on this subject, but imho, especially in php, getter and setter are evil (you can google that, a lot have been said one this subject). For me, if an object property can be public, protected or private, it make sense that we use it as expected: some properties need to be accessed in all the project, some just by children classes, and some have to be accessed just in the class. Anyway, it doesn't impact the matter. You said Decorator is not the good pattern, which one should I use? Or maybe which combination of pattern? –  Pierre Nov 13 '13 at 11:13
    
Your solution is not strictly a decorator, because a decorator need that behaviours can be added, and in your solution, it can just be changed, the chaining functionality is broken. –  Pierre Nov 13 '13 at 11:13
    
Thanks! I don't encourage you to use setters and getters in thisIn the solution I am not using the Decorator pattern, the pattern used in the code is a form of the Mediator pattern. –  Mohamed Alkaduhimi Nov 13 '13 at 15:16

Still a bit incomplete but it does basically everything:

  1. abstract Component class that everything extends.
  2. abstract Decorator class that modifies classes extending Component.

It's a lot of code so here's the pastebin link:

[Old] http://pastebin.com/mz4WKEzD

[New] http://pastebin.com/i7xpYuLe

Components

  1. Can extend one another
  2. Can modify / add / remove properties
  3. Can share properties with decorators

Decorators

  1. Can attatch functions to components
  2. Can modify / add / remove component properties

Example Input

$Sugar = 1;
$DoubleSugar = 1;

$Cofee = new SimpleCofee();
$Tea   = new SimpleTea();

$Cofee->Produce();
$Tea->Produce();

print "\n============\n\n";

if($Sugar)
{
    new SugarCube($Cofee);
    $Cofee->Produce();
    new SugarCube($Cofee);
    $Cofee->Produce();
}

if($DoubleSugar)
{
    new SugarCube($Tea);
    $Tea->Produce();
    new SugarCube($Tea);
    $Tea->Produce();
}

OutPut

Making coffee....
Adding Water: 150
Making cofee: array (
  'cofeee' => 25,
)
Making tea....
Adding Water: 150
Making tea: array (
  'tea' => 25,
)

============

Making coffee....
Adding sugar: 1
Adding Water: 140
Making cofee: array (
  'cofeee' => 25,
  'Spoon' => 1,
)
Making coffee....
Adding sugar: 1
Adding sugar: 1
Adding Water: 120
Making cofee: array (
  'cofeee' => 25,
  'Spoon' => 1,
)
Making tea....
Adding sugar: 2
Adding Water: 130
Making tea: array (
  'tea' => 25,
  'Spoon' => 1,
)
Making tea....
Adding sugar: 2
Adding sugar: 2
Adding Water: 90
Making tea: array (
  'tea' => 25,
  'Spoon' => 1,
)

UPDATE

That was crazy but now children can overload parent functions. On top of that you can now use array interface $this['var'] to access shared properties. Hashes will be added automatically and transparently.

The only downside is that parents have to allow functions to be overloaded.

NEW Output

Making Cofee....
Adding Water: 150
Making Cofee: array (
  'cofeee' => 25,
)
Making Tea....
Adding Water: 150
Making Tea: array (
  'tea' => 25,
)

============

Making Cofee....
Adding sugar: 1
Adding Water: 140
Making Cofee: array (
  'cofeee' => 25,
  'Spoon' => 1,
)
Making Cofee....
Adding sugar: 1
Adding sugar: 1
Adding Water: 120
Making Cofee: array (
  'cofeee' => 25,
  'Spoon' => 1,
)

I have take over Produce!
But I'm a nice guy so I'll call my parent

Making Tea....
Adding sugar: 2
Adding Water: 130
Making Tea: array (
  'tea' => 25,
  'Spoon' => 1,
)

I have take over Produce!
But I'm a nice guy so I'll call my parent

Making Tea....
Adding sugar: 2
Adding sugar: 2
Adding Water: 90
Making Tea: array (
  'tea' => 25,
  'Spoon' => 1,
)

============

DoubleSugarCube::SuperChain(array (
  0 => 'test',
))
SugarCube::SuperChain(array (
  0 => 'DoubleSugarCube',
))
SimpleTea::SuperChain(array (
  0 => 'SugarCube',
))
SimpleCofee::SuperChain(array (
  0 => 'SimpleTea',
))

UPDATE

This is my final draft. I can't keep changing my solution bit by bit. If there is something wrong state it all in a list.

Removed callparent and put all functionality of it into parent::function

  1. Children have access to parents properties.
  2. Children can overload parent functions.
  3. Overloading will start at base class all the way up till abstract class Decorator class. Afterwards the properties / methods are obtained from parent passed to constructor.
  4. You said you liked your method of property sharing. So I haven't bothered to answer that.

I hope you'll accept the answer now. If not then I look forward to yours. I hope when you sort everything out you will share it with the rest of us.

Cheers

share|improve this answer
    
I have to say... Wow! mAsT3RpEE, you arrive here, 17h before the end of the bounty, and you understood a good part of the problem, and give a smart solution on the first answer. For that, +1. But... (Yes there is a "but", and not only one) I prefer my solution for sharing properties (your solution work I guess, but for me the hash way is not really beautiful). A child cannot replace his parent methods, and just call his direct parent ones without calling other chained-decorators ones. –  Pierre Nov 19 '13 at 0:13
    
You use ->parent (and I guess, if you want to solve the problem "A child cannot replace his parent methods", ->this) which I wanted to avoid. More generally, your code is not clean and you'll need a lot of Xtra code in the decorators. But if you can improve that, you'll win the +50. But I'm not satisfied, you are just the one who have done the bests efforts. –  Pierre Nov 19 '13 at 0:23
    
If you don't have time to improve all, just focus on the methods (the properties is not mandatory), and if you can fiund a solution for $this->parent and $this->this (replaced with parent:: and $this), your answer will be the accepted one. –  Pierre Nov 19 '13 at 0:45
    
@Pierre About the $hash? This is important. The hash makes it impossible for a child class to access the parents properties. Either it must rehash the parent class or use the data hash value. I put it there specifically for my own reason. –  mAsT3RpEE Nov 19 '13 at 6:26
    
@Pierre I will make the hashing automatic. so you can use $this['coffee'] instead of $this[$hash.'coffee']. Also note. Children can only override parent properties if they are defined. Otherwise only a local copy of the property is added (this also done on purpose). If you want decorators to share properties you will have to pass the decorator instead of the parent class. –  mAsT3RpEE Nov 19 '13 at 6:36

there is a solution to fit the coffeemachine problem

abstract class Coffee { 
    protected $cup = array();
    public function getCup() {
        return $this->cup;
    } 
}   
class SimpleCoffee extends Coffee {
    public function __construct() {
        $this->cup['coffeePowder'] = 1;
        $this->cup['water']        = 20;
        $this->cup['spoon']        = FALSE;
    }
}

abstract class Decorator extends Coffee { 
    private $_handler = null;

    public function __construct($handler) {
        $this->_handler = $handler;
        $this->cup      = $handler->cup;
    }
}

class SugarCoffee extends Decorator {
    public function __construct($handler) {
        parent::__construct($handler);
        $this->cup['water'] -= 1;
        $this->cup['sugar']  = 1;
        $this->cup['spoon']  = TRUE;
    }
}
class MilkCoffee extends Decorator{
    public function __construct($handler) {
        parent::__construct($handler);
        $this->cup['water'] -= 5;
        $this->cup['milk']    = 5;
    }
}

$wantSugar = TRUE;
$wantMilk  = TRUE;

$coffee = new SimpleCoffee();
if($wantSugar)
    $coffee = new SugarCoffee($coffee);
if($wantMilk)
    $coffee = new MilkCoffee($coffee);

$cupOfCoffee = $coffee->getCup();

var_dump($cupOfCoffee);

and there is another real world example, I hope it can help you:

abstract class MessageBoardHandler {
    public function __construct(){}
    abstract public function filter($msg);
}
class MessageBoard extends MessageBoardHandler {
    public function filter($msg) {
        return "added in messageBoard|".$msg;
    }
}
class MessageBoardDecorator extends MessageBoardHandler {
    private $_handler = null;
    public function __construct($handler) {
        parent::__construct(); 
        $this->_handler = $handler;
    }
    public function filter($msg) {
        return $this->_handler->filter($msg);
    } 
}
class HtmlFilter extends MessageBoardDecorator {
    public function __construct($handler) {
        parent::__construct($handler);
    } 
    public function filter($msg) {
        return "added in html filter|".parent::filter($msg);
    }   
}   
class SensitiveFilter extends MessageBoardDecorator {
    public function __construct($handler) {
        parent::__construct($handler);
    }   
    public function filter($msg) {
        return "added in sensitive filter|".parent::filter($msg);
    }   
}
$html      = TRUE;
$sencitive = TRUE;
$obj = new MessageBoard();
if($html) {
    $obj = new SensitiveFilter($obj);
}
if($sencitive) {
    $obj = new HtmlFilter($obj);
}
echo $obj->filter("message");
share|improve this answer
    
Because it breaks the decorator-chaining. It's ok for the first of the chain (the one I called "Foo"), which will be always instanciated, but for the others (Bar, Baz, etc), the chain of inheritance have to be programaticaly defined, according to the context. If you hardcode like that (is it really what you meant?): class Baz extends Bar{... it becomes a classical "static" inheritance. Anyway, thank you for answering, if you want to edit or to add a new answer, it will be welcome. –  Pierre Nov 12 '13 at 17:00
    
I updated the sourcecode. I don't know if it is what you want. –  Fu Xu Nov 12 '13 at 17:45
    
Yes! It's more something like that. But you said that the decorator-chaining is not broken, and it is. The abstraction of behaviour is something I want, but not only. I want that according to the context, the object can be always a component, sometimes a Foo, sometimes a Bar (what you've done) and sometimes a Foo AND a Bar (with Bar "extends" Foo, what you have not done). I enjoy your efforts, continue. –  Pierre Nov 13 '13 at 9:28
    
oh. I know. so you do not need a abstract class Component. but an instance of Component before it is turned to be an instance of a sub class of Component ? –  Fu Xu Nov 15 '13 at 3:08
    
Yes you're right, it's a way to do that, the one I chosed, the classical way to do that, the decorator pattern way. With this pattern, Component is abstract because you can define abstract functions (not implemented) that must be defined in sub class. But it's not mandatory in my example (because there is always a foo instance), and I think you've well understood what I want to do. The goal is only to do a kind of dynamic inheritance. Have you seen my "real world example" (the cofee machine), in the question? It can maybe help you to understand what I want. You could read Mohamed response too. –  Pierre Nov 15 '13 at 9:39

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