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The default for white-space field separators, such as tab when using FS = "\t", in AWK is either one or many. Therefore, if you want to read in a tab separated file with null values in some columns (other than the last), it skips over them. For example:

1 "\t" 2 "\t" "" "\t" 4 "\t" 5

$3 would refer to 4, not the null "" even though there are clearly two tabs.

What should I do so that I can specify the field separator to be one tab only, so that $4 would refer to 4 and not 5?

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wrt the statement that The default for white-space field separators, such as tab when using FS = "\t", in AWK is either one or many. - that is not true. In awk, the ONLY "special case" field separator is a single space character, which is the default - when that is used then fields are separated by contiguous chains of any white space. For all other field separators, whatever RE you tell awk to use is exactly what it does use. –  Ed Morton Aug 8 '13 at 2:28

1 Answer 1

 echo '1 "\t" 2 "\t" "" "\t" 4 "\t" 5' | awk -F"\t" '{print "$3="$3 , "$4="$4}'

output

$3=" "" " $4=" 4 " 

So you can remove the dbl-quotes in your original string, and get

echo '1\t2\t\t4\t5' | awk -F"\t" '{print "$3="$3 , "$4="$4}'

output2

$3= $4=4

You're right, the default FS is white space, with the caveat that space and tab char next to each other, would qualify as 1 FS instance. So to use just "\t" as your FS, you can do as above as a cmd-line argument, or you can include an explict reset on FS, usually done in a BEGIN block, like

echo '1 "\t" 2 "\t" "" "\t" 4 "\t" 5' | awk 'BEGIN{FS="\t"}{print "$3="$3 , "$4="$4}'

IHTH

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