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I need two compare to strings to see if they are the same value, both strings are in Japanese. This check seems to fail and I assume it's some shortcoming of JavaScript and UTF-8. Should it be expected for this to succeed? And how can I make it work? Can JavaScript convert to strings like \x{57fc} to perform comparison on?

var foo = '郵便番号',
    bar = '郵便番号';

if(foo == bar){
    console.log('they are the same');
}

UPDATE

It appears this actually works just fine, the failure is a bigger issue with backbone validation. Thanks for the answers.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You forgot the quotes on your strings!

Run your current code with the browser console open, and you'll see a ReferenceError due to the missing quotes (the interpreter will think 郵便番号 is an identifier, not a string).

Wrap your strings in proper quotes, and it just works, JavaScript can handle UTF-8 just fine:

var foo = '郵便番号',
    bar = '郵便番号';

if(foo == bar){
    console.log('they are the same');
}

Regarding your second question, you can use '\u57fc', but usually you don't need to; it's the same as a literal '埼'.

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My code sample was wrong, I am wrapping these values in quotes. –  Patrick Robert Shea O'Connor Aug 8 '13 at 3:19
    
And it doesn't work for you? Code above worked for me in Chrome console. –  bfavaretto Aug 8 '13 at 3:24

Possible try (foo === bar), two equal signs and 3 equal signs have a slightly different function and can sometimes be a problem. Not sure it will work but it should. Also is the have you got the japanese characters enclosed in quotation marks?

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Your code seems to run just fine but have to add the quotes:

var foo =  "\u90F5\u4FBF\u756A\u53F7",
    bar = "郵便番号";

if(foo === bar){
    console.log('they are the same');
}

\x is used for regular expression but could not get it to work in JavaScript, the \u syntax works:

var foo =  /\u90F5\u4FBF\u756A\u53F7/,
    bar = "\u90F5便番号";

if(foo.test(bar)){
    console.log('they are the same');
}
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