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I've recently started using IQueryable inspired by http://www.codethinked.com/keep-your-iqueryable-in-check. So I've been used to doing this in my repos:

public IEnumerable<POCO> GetById(int id)
{
   using (var ctx = new DbContext())
   {
      var query = from ...;
      return query.ToList();
   }
}

Now I'm doing this instead:

public IPageable<POCO> GetById(int id)
{
   var ctx = new DbContext()
   var query = from ...;
   return new Pageable(query);
}

But I'm wondering if this is the best way to handle new DbContext(). Is it better to place DbContext as a class member

public class Repo
{
   private DbContext _ctx = new DbContext();
}

Or even injection it

public class Repo
{
   private DbContext _ctx;

   public Repo(DbContext ctx)
   {
      _ctx = ctx;
   }
}

What are the pros and cons to:

  1. a new DbContext in each method.
  2. a new DbContext per object (class member).
  3. injecting DbContext.

I'm using Ninject so I can use .InRequestScope(); (if that should effect the answer)

A couple other questions:

  • Should my repo implement IDisposable if DbContext is kept as a class member?
  • Is there an even better way to handle disposal of DbContext then the above?
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would always go with injecting the DBContext, with the InRequestScope. Gives all benefits of dependency injection.Ninject would also dispose the DBContext on the end of the cycle as DBContext implements IDisposable. See this thread

If you use DI, your other two questions become irrelevant.

share|improve this answer

Entity Framework loves caching. If you are constantly changing your application and reloading it in your browser, you'll probably notice that the first time you reload it, it takes a couple of seconds to load, but after that, pages are almost instantaneous. This is because MVC and EF are caching common queries that are repeatedly used, making your app faster to use after that initial load time.

Because of this, it is not of huge concern where you create your DBContext. Yes, creating anything takes time. However, EF will recognize these queries and will load them quickly, even if you have just created a new instance of your context.

On a side note, if your application doesn't have a large amount of queries, the use of Using blocks around your DbContext would be considered ideal (as this handles the dispose for you), but again, the runtime and memory use results would be negligible.

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